Summer Courses 2024

Course Search

On this page you will find the tentative list of Summer Online courses for 2024. Class meeting patterns are subject to change until registration opens on March 20th, 2024. If you have any questions regarding the Summer Online course offerings, please email summeronline@nd.edu.

For information on financial aid, please visit summersession.nd.edu/tuition-financial-aid.

Please note:

  • Graduate students can utilize their Summer Tuition Scholarships towards Summer Online courses.
  • Faculty and staff may use their educational benefits towards Summer Online courses for themselves and their dependents. More information can be found on the Ask HR site.

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Edward Hums

ACCT 20100 | Foundations of Accountancy
Edward Hums

An introduction to financial accounting and the accounting profession, with an emphasis on the decision-usefulness of accounting information. The course stresses the relation of accounting to economic activity, organizing information for decision-making, the resource acquisition decision, the uses of cash and noncash resources, the accounting for selling and manufacturing activities, and the information needs of multiple owners, lenders and equity holders. A prerequisite of all accountancy and finance courses. Course cannot be taken Pass/Fail.

  • Accountancy
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1597
  • 49 of 50 enrolled
  • MTWR 05:30 PM-07:20 PM 06/03 - 07/11
  • BA02,BCOR,OLF,ZIMB,

Edward Hums

ACCT 20200 | Acct Analysis Plan and Control
Edward Hums

An introduction to the use of accounting information and analysis for management decisions and control of an organization. The purpose of the course is to learn techniques necessary to understand an organization's costs to allow for the preparation and analysis of an organization's budget. Further, the course provides techniques to analyze cost-volume-profit relationships and the use of a company's contribution margin to evaluate sales volumes, set appropriate selling prices, and determine appropriate sales mixes necessary to achieve desired profit levels. The course uses cost analysis to understand managerial decisions such as whether to outsource, eliminate or add a business segment, and accept special orders. The course also introduces US taxation by examining different entity types and various taxes that impact individuals and corporations. Course cannot be taken Pass/Fail.

  • Accountancy
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1598
  • 27 of 50 enrolled
  • MTWR 08:00 PM-09:50 PM 06/03 - 07/11
  • BA02,BBRD,OLF,ZIMB,

Keith Urtel

ACCT 30120 | Acct Measurement&Disclosure II
Keith Urtel

Accounting Measurement & Disclosure II continues the examination of how financial reporting provides decision-useful information to help cultivate a prosperous society. By focusing on the interrelationships among the financial statements and note disclosures, the course significantly enhances the student's ability to analyze financial reports. The course explains the economic and accounting issues related to income taxes, leasing arrangements, share-based compensation, retirement plans, debt securities, passive and active equity investments, foreign currency transactions, business segments, and earnings per share. In addition, the course makes extensive use of cases tied to real companies and explores recent developments in regulation and business. The course is designed to strengthen the technical, communication, and critical thinking skills required to succeed in accounting-related careers. Course cannot be taken Pass/Fail.

  • Accountancy
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2137
  • 1 of 2 enrolled
  • TBA 06/03 - 07/26
  • BAMC,OLF,

Jeffrey Burks

ACCT 30280 | Data Analytics in Accounting
Jeffrey Burks

This course applies data analytics to settings within accounting, using statistics as the primary method and Microsoft Excel as the primary tool along with other add-ins and programs. The aim of the course is to enhance a student's ability to think systematically about data, structure it into a usable and interpretable form, create decision models, and weigh probability, risk, trade offs, and the limitations of data.

  • Accountancy
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2170
  • 2 of 2 enrolled
  • TBA 06/03 - 07/26
  • BAMC,OLF,

Keith Urtel

ACCT 40510 | Audit and Assurance Services
Keith Urtel

The study of an independent accountant's auditing and assurance services. Topics include risk assessment, internal controls, audit testing and evidence, assessment of materiality, auditor's reporting, and independence and ethics. Course cannot be taken Pass/Fail.

  • Accountancy
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2171
  • 2 of 2 enrolled
  • TBA 06/03 - 07/26
  • BAMC,OLF,

James O'Brien

ACCT 40710 | Bus Law: Property & Neg. Instr
James O'Brien

This course (ACCT 40710) involves the application of the following legal topics to business situations: organization structures and entity selection; secured transactions, mortgages, and creditor rights; commercial paper and negotiable instruments, including promissory notes; real estate including an analysis of various fee interests and personal property; and a general overview of estate and trust law. The course is highly recommended for students planning to sit for the CPA exam, as well as students planning to go to law school. Additionally, the course is beneficial for future business owners and managers and the course fulfills one of the class requirements for the Real Estate Minor. This course cannot be taken Pass/Fail.

  • Accountancy
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2138
  • 8 of 30 enrolled
  • MTWRF 07:00 PM-09:00 PM 06/24 - 07/19
  • MREL,OLF,

Roger Woodard

ACMS 20215 | R Programming
Roger Woodard

In this course, you will learn the foundational skills necessary in R that will enable you to acquire and manipulate data, complete exploratory data analysis (EDA), and create visualizations to communicate your findings. Note: this course is delivered fully online. The course design combines required live weekly meetings online with self-scheduled lectures, problems, assignments, and interactive learning materials. To participate, students will need to have a computer with webcam, reliable internet connection, and a quiet place to participate in live sessions

  • Applied & Comp Math and Stats
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 1592
  • 3 of 15 enrolled
  • R 07:00 PM-09:00 PM 06/17 - 07/26
  • OLF,ZIMB,

Victoria Woodard

ACMS 20216 | Python Programming
Victoria Woodard

In this course, you will learn the foundational skills necessary in Python that will enable you to acquire and manipulate data, model data for the purposes of scientific analysis, and create visualizations to communicate your findings. The course will introduce you to efficient scientific computing using NumPy. You will learn how to apply the pandas library to perform a variety of data manipulation tasks, including selecting, subsetting, combining, grouping, and aggregating data. You will also learn how to generate and customize visualizations with matplotlib. The course will give you the basic ideas and intuition behind modern data analysis methods and their applications, with a strong focus on a course project and weekly assignments. Note: this course is delivered fully online. The course design combines required live weekly meetings online with self-scheduled lectures, problems, assignments, and interactive learning materials. To participate, students will need to have a computer with webcam, reliable internet connection, and a quiet place to participate in live sessions.

  • Applied & Comp Math and Stats
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 1594
  • 6 of 9 enrolled
  • TBA 06/10 - 06/16 |W 07:00 PM-09:00 PM 06/17 - 07/26
  • OLF,ZIMB,

Christopher Frederick

ACMS 30617 | SQL For Data Science
Christopher Frederick

This course will teach students how to use Structured Query Language (SQL) to access and manipulate data stored in databases. Students will learn fundamental commands for filtering records, selecting variables, and merging data tables. Students will also create and modify relational database schemas to store structured data. Students will apply these skills in the context of solving a research question, using SQL to obtain the appropriate data set, and then using Python and Jupyter Notebooks to create an appropriate visualization and conduct further analysis in Python.

  • Applied & Comp Math and Stats
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1596
  • 6 of 30 enrolled
  • T 07:00 PM-08:50 PM 06/17 - 07/26
  • OLF,

Roger Woodard

ACMS 60051 | R Programming
Roger Woodard

In this course, you will learn the foundational skills necessary in R that will enable you to acquire and manipulate data, complete exploratory data analysis (EDA), and create visualizations to communicate your findings. Note: this course is delivered fully online. The course design combines required live weekly meetings online with self-scheduled lectures, problems, assignments, and interactive learning materials. To participate, students will need to have a computer with webcam, reliable internet connection, and a quiet place to participate in live sessions

  • Applied & Comp Math and Stats
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 1593
  • 10 of 15 enrolled
  • R 07:00 PM-09:00 PM 06/17 - 07/26
  • OLF,ZIMB,

Victoria Woodard

ACMS 60052 | Python Programming
Victoria Woodard

In this course, you will learn the foundational skills necessary in Python that will enable you to acquire and manipulate data, model data for the purposes of scientific analysis, and create visualizations to communicate your findings. The course will introduce you to efficient scientific computing using NumPy. You will learn how to apply the pandas library to perform a variety of data manipulation tasks, including selecting, subsetting, combining, grouping, and aggregating data. You will also learn how to generate and customize visualizations with matplotlib. The course will give you the basic ideas and intuition behind modern data analysis methods and their applications, with a strong focus on a course project and weekly assignments. Note: this course is delivered fully online. The course design combines required live weekly meetings online with self-scheduled lectures, problems, assignments, and interactive learning materials. To participate, students will need to have a computer with webcam, reliable internet connection, and a quiet place to participate in live sessions.

  • Applied & Comp Math and Stats
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 1595
  • 13 of 23 enrolled
  • TBA 06/10 - 06/16 |W 07:00 PM-09:00 PM 06/17 - 07/26
  • OLF,ZIMB,

Christopher Frederick

ACMS 60617 | SQL For Data Science
Christopher Frederick

This course will teach students how to use Structured Query Language (SQL) to access and manipulate data stored in databases. Students will learn fundamental commands for filtering records, selecting variables, and merging data tables. Students will also create and modify relational database schemas to store structured data. Students will apply these skills in the context of solving a research question, using SQL to obtain the appropriate data set, and then using Python and Jupyter Notebooks to create an appropriate visualization and conduct further analysis in Python.

  • Applied & Comp Math and Stats
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1635
  • 6 of 15 enrolled
  • T 07:00 PM-08:50 PM 06/17 - 07/26
  • OLF,

Peter Cajka

AMST 30165 | The Vietnam War&Amer Catholics
Peter Cajka

How did the most divisive war in American History shape the nation's biggest church community? This course explores Catholics as both supporters and detractors of the Vietnam War. American Catholics wished to see America defeat Communism but, importantly, the power of faith motivated many to criticize the state's escalation of the conflict. Students will explore the tensions and transformations of this important moment in American life. Lectures and classroom discussions will address decolonization, the global and national nature of American Catholicism, the power of the liberal state, conscientious objection, the "Spirit of the Sixties," sacramental protests, the rise of human rights, geopolitics, and the Cold War. Course readings will include the latest scholarship, but also primary sources like poems, films, songs, letters, prayers, newspaper articles, and art. Students will have access to the rich materials of Catholic peace activists found in the University of Notre Dame Archives.

  • American Studies
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1977
  • 3 of 7 enrolled
  • MW 07:00 PM-09:00 PM 06/03 - 07/26
  • AMS2,ANME,OLF, WKCD,WKHI

Peter Cajka

AMST 30165 | The Vietnam War&Amer Catholics
Peter Cajka

How did the most divisive war in American History shape the nation's biggest church community? This course explores Catholics as both supporters and detractors of the Vietnam War. American Catholics wished to see America defeat Communism but, importantly, the power of faith motivated many to criticize the state's escalation of the conflict. Students will explore the tensions and transformations of this important moment in American life. Lectures and classroom discussions will address decolonization, the global and national nature of American Catholicism, the power of the liberal state, conscientious objection, the "Spirit of the Sixties," sacramental protests, the rise of human rights, geopolitics, and the Cold War. Course readings will include the latest scholarship, but also primary sources like poems, films, songs, letters, prayers, newspaper articles, and art. Students will have access to the rich materials of Catholic peace activists found in the University of Notre Dame Archives.

  • American Studies
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2136
  • 10 of 12 enrolled
  • MW 07:00 PM-09:00 PM 06/03 - 07/26
  • AMS2,ANME,OLF, WKCD,WKHI

Sharon Yoon

ANTH 20303 | Global Korea
Sharon Yoon

What does it mean to be Korean? How are definitions of Korea and ?Koreanness? affected by recent waves of globalization and migration? This course investigates the social construction of race and nationhood within the context of South Korea. While many believe South Korea to be ethnically and racially homogeneous, the country has increasingly opened up its borders to foreign migration to offset the adverse impact of its rapidly aging society. More than one in ten marriages in South Korea involves a foreign-born person today, and growing numbers of racially mixed people consider themselves Korean. In addition, members of the Korean diaspora have started to ?return? to their country of origin in recent years, only to find that they are marginalized because of their culturally different backgrounds. This course introduces students to sociological theories of race, ethnicity, and nationhood by analyzing how South Koreans define self and Other. We will learn how racial and ethnic identities continue to evolve as the contexts of migration change. We will also learn why it is difficult for individuals of particular backgrounds to find a sense of belonging in the societies in which they live and work.

  • Anthropology
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2255
  • 1 of 2 enrolled
  • MW 08:00 PM-09:30 PM 06/03 - 07/26
  • OLF, WKSS

Peter Cajka

ANTH 30116 | The Vietnam War&Amer Catholics
Peter Cajka

How did the most divisive war in American History shape the nation's biggest church community? This course explores Catholics as both supporters and detractors of the Vietnam War. American Catholics wished to see America defeat Communism but, importantly, the power of faith motivated many to criticize the states escalation of the conflict. Students will explore the tensions and transformations of this important moment in American life. Lectures and classroom discussions will address decolonization, the global and national nature of American Catholicism, the power of the liberal state, conscientious objection, the Spirit of the Sixties, sacramental protests, the rise of human rights, geopolitics, and the Cold War. Course readings will include the latest scholarship, but also primary sources like poems, films, songs, letters, prayers, newspaper articles, and art. Students will have access to the rich materials of Catholic peace activists found in the University of Notre Dame Archives.

  • Anthropology
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1989
  • 0 of 2 enrolled
  • MW 07:00 PM-09:00 PM 06/03 - 07/26
  • ALSS,ANME,OLF, WKCD,WKHI

Kristopher Johnson

ARST 20401 | Photography I
Kristopher Johnson

BA Core Option/BFA Core. MATERIALS FEE. This course is an introduction to the theory and practice of still photography. It is designed for all students interested in developing their photographic skills and also serves as the entry-level sequence for the photo major in studio art. The course is based on the use of digital cameras. Adobe Lightroom software and professional quality inkjet printing. Creative assignments introduce students to various thematic approaches including documentary work and portraits. Presentations cover both historical and contemporary approaches to the medium. A digital SLR camera with manual controls is highly recommended; or students may check out departmental cameras to complete assignments. A portable hard drive compatible with the Apple OS platform is required for storing personal files.

  • Art Studio
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1587
  • 7 of 13 enrolled
  • MWR 04:00 PM-06:00 PM 06/03 - 07/26
  • 2DCO,CDDA,CDDF,OLF,WKAL, FNAR

Kristopher Johnson

ARST 60401 | Photography I
Kristopher Johnson

MATERIALS FEE. This course is an introduction to the theory and practice of still photography. It is designed for all students interested in developing their photographic skills and also serves as the entry-level sequence for the photo major in studio art. The course is based on the use of digital cameras. Adobe Lightroom software and professional quality inkjet printing. Creative assignments introduce students to various thematic approaches including documentary work and portraits. Presentations cover both historical and contemporary approaches to the medium. A digital SLR camera with manual controls is highly recommended; or students may check out departmental cameras to complete assignments. A portable hard drive compatible with the Apple OS platform is required for storing personal files.

  • Art Studio
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2299
  • 0 of 1 enrolled
  • MWR 04:00 PM-06:00 PM 06/03 - 07/26
  • OLF,WKAL, FNAR

Sharon Yoon

ASIA 20300 | Global Korea
Sharon Yoon

What does it mean to be Korean? How are definitions of Korea and ?Koreanness? affected by recent waves of globalization and migration? This course investigates the social construction of race and nationhood within the context of South Korea. While many believe South Korea to be ethnically and racially homogeneous, the country has increasingly opened up its borders to foreign migration to offset the adverse impact of its rapidly aging society. More than one in ten marriages in South Korea involves a foreign-born person today, and growing numbers of racially mixed people consider themselves Korean. In addition, members of the Korean diaspora have started to ?return? to their country of origin in recent years, only to find that they are marginalized because of their culturally different backgrounds. This course introduces students to sociological theories of race, ethnicity, and nationhood by analyzing how South Koreans define self and Other. We will learn how racial and ethnic identities continue to evolve as the contexts of migration change. We will also learn why it is difficult for individuals of particular backgrounds to find a sense of belonging in the societies in which they live and work.

  • Asian Studies
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2258
  • 2 of 6 enrolled
  • MW 08:00 PM-09:30 PM 06/03 - 07/26
  • ASSS,OLF, WKSS

Mitchell Olsen

BAEG 20110 | Foundations of Marketing
Mitchell Olsen

A study of markets, institutions, and the environment in which business firms operate with attention to the effect these facets, forces, and issues have on the firm's overall marketing strategy.

  • Business Administration - EG
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2224
  • 5 of 7 enrolled
  • MW 07:30 PM-09:00 PM 05/20 - 06/27
  • OLF,

James O'Brien

BALW 30100 | Business Law Concepts
James O'Brien

Whether you own or are employed by a business, you must understand your rights and obligations under the American legal system. This course touches on some of the most important aspects of the legal system as it affects business and employment, including the courts and legal proceedings, the law of contracts, agency, torts, and intellectual property. Students will develop an appreciation of how law affects business decision-making, of competing policy concerns underlying the law, and of ethical dimensions of legal issues and business situations.

  • Bus Admin - Business Law
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2139
  • 44 of 50 enrolled
  • MTWRF 10:00 AM-12:00 PM 05/27 - 06/21
  • BA02,BBRD,OLF,

Mitchell Olsen

BASC 20250 | Foundations of Marketing
Mitchell Olsen

A study of markets, institutions, and the environment in which business firms operate with attention to the effect these facets, forces, and issues have on the firm's overall marketing strategy.

  • Business Administration - SC
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2225
  • 1 of 5 enrolled
  • MW 07:30 PM-09:00 PM 05/20 - 06/27
  • OLF,

John Sikorski

BES 30795 | Why Business?
John Sikorski

What is the role of business in a just and humane society? Many of you are about to dedicate your lives to business, and the rest of you will work, in one way or another, with business. Yet many people believe that business is a morally suspicious activity, a suspicion evident in the common belief that business people need to "give back" to society. Is business an activity for which one must atone? Are people right to be suspicious of business? This course is designed to engage ideas from the Catholic tradition with perspectives drawn from moral philosophy, business, and economics. We will engage issues of faith and normativity both critically and constructively. Students will consider competing positions on faith and normative questions, will reflect on (or discover elements of) their own faith or non-faith, and will describe the extent to which they believe various claims are supported by faith or reason. This course responds to Pope John Paul II's Centesimus Annus (1991) and Pope Francis's Laudato Si (2015), which called on Catholic education to "safeguard the moral conditions for an authentic 'human ecology'" (Centesimus Annus, 38).

  • Business Ethics and Society
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1915
  • 15 of 30 enrolled
  • TR 06:00 PM-07:30 PM 06/03 - 07/14
  • MBCG,OLF, WKCD

Giles Duffield

BIOS 30344 | Vertebrate (Human) Physiology
Giles Duffield

Physiological functions and processes at the level of organs and organ systems, oriented primarily toward humans.

  • Biological Sciences
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2236
  • 13 of 25 enrolled
  • TR 10:00 AM-12:00 PM 06/03 - 07/26
  • CBMC,CHSE,CMNB,NSBH,OLF,

Nuno Moniz

CDT 10710 | History of A.I.
Nuno Moniz

How can we discuss the present and future of Artificial Intelligence if we don't understand its past and how we arrived at our current situation? As the pervasiveness of Artificial Intelligence (AI) in our lives and society reaches new levels, new and old questions arise, demonstrating the urgency in equipping present and future generations with tools to understand the evolution of AI better. For over 70 years, AI has provided us with an enthusiastic sequence of events beyond the continuous cycles of hype and disillusion. Understanding how these events unfolded is crucial to understanding and debating AI today and foreseeing its future applications and challenges. The "History of Artificial Intelligence" course has three main learning goals: 1) identify critical events that influenced the rise of AI and align them with the history of related scientific disciplines; 2) describe the various phases of AI's evolution and context and discuss their influence in present discussions; and, 3) reflect on AI's ethical/societal implications and critique current/possible applications.

  • Computing & Digtl Technologies
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2248
  • 14 of 15 enrolled
  • MT 10:00 AM-11:30 AM 06/10 - 07/19
  • OLF,ZIMB,

Jason Daniels

CDT 20101 | VCD 1: Fundamentals of Design
Jason Daniels

MATERIALS FEE. Fundamentals of Design is a gateway course for Visual Communication Design that introduces students to basic design elements like color, form, composition and typography. This course explores and helps develop an understanding of the delicate balance between these design elements and how they have been skillfully used over time to create some of the most persuasive images and enduring messages. The course is an exercise in deconstruction and reconstruction of visual images using design elements as tools. Through assignments, students will work digitally to explore color, form, composition, texture and typography; first individually and then in conjunction with other elements. Initial assignments will be short and will focus on the understanding of a singular element. As the course progresses, students will be expected to use experiences from these short assignments and use them as building block for more complex projects. Above all, the course builds a vigorous foundation that allows students to acquire visual skillsets that serve as a firm foundation for advanced level courses in Visual Communication Design.

  • Computing & Digtl Technologies
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1759
  • 1 of 1 enrolled
  • MW 06:00 PM-07:00 PM 06/03 - 07/26
  • OLF,WKAL, FNAR

Roger Woodard

CDT 20641 | R Programming
Roger Woodard

In this course, you will learn the foundational skills necessary in R that will enable you to acquire and manipulate data, complete exploratory data analysis (EDA), and create visualizations to communicate your findings. Note: this course is delivered fully online. The course design combines required live weekly meetings online with self-scheduled lectures, problems, assignments, and interactive learning materials. To participate, students will need to have a computer with webcam, reliable internet connection, and a quiet place to participate in live sessions. Students with other prerequisite courses or equivalent background preparation may enroll by permission of the instructor or permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies, Professor Alan Huebner (Alan.Huebner.10@nd.edu).

  • Computing & Digtl Technologies
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 1629
  • 2 of 5 enrolled
  • R 07:00 PM-09:00 PM 06/17 - 07/26
  • CDDF,CDTD,OLF,ZIMB,

Victoria Woodard

CDT 20642 | Python Programming
Victoria Woodard

In this course, you will learn the foundational skills necessary in Python that will enable you to acquire and manipulate data, model data for the purposes of scientific analysis, and create visualizations to communicate your findings. The course will introduce you to efficient scientific computing using NumPy. You will learn how to apply the pandas library to perform a variety of data manipulation tasks, including selecting, subsetting, combining, grouping, and aggregating data. You will also learn how to generate and customize visualizations with matplotlib. The course will give you the basic ideas and intuition behind modern data analysis methods and their applications, with a strong focus on a course project and weekly assignments. Note: this course is delivered fully online. The course design combines required live weekly meetings online with self-scheduled lectures, problems, assignments, and interactive learning materials. To participate, students will need to have a computer with webcam, reliable internet connection, and a quiet place to participate in live sessions. Students with other prerequisite courses or equivalent background preparation may enroll by permission of the instructor or permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies, Professor Alan Huebner (Alan.Huebner.10@nd.edu).

  • Computing & Digtl Technologies
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 1630
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • TBA 06/10 - 06/16 |W 07:00 PM-09:00 PM 06/17 - 07/26
  • CDDF,CDTD,OLF,ZIMB,

Jason Daniels

CDT 21102 | VCD Software Tutorial
Jason Daniels

This one-credit course will focus on Adobe Creative Suite software. The class will meet one evening per week throughout the course of the semester. Programs and topics to be covered will be Adobe Photoshop, InDesign, Adobe Illustrator, proper file preparation, and font access and usage.

  • Computing & Digtl Technologies
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1758
  • 1 of 1 enrolled
  • R 06:00 PM-07:00 PM 06/03 - 07/26
  • OLF,

Christopher Frederick

CDT 30643 | SQL For Data Science
Christopher Frederick

This course will teach students how to use Structured Query Language (SQL) to access and manipulate data stored in databases. Students will learn fundamental commands for filtering records, selecting variables, and merging data tables. Students will also create and modify relational database schemas to store structured data. Students will apply these skills in the context of solving a research question, using SQL to obtain the appropriate data set, and then using Python and Jupyter Notebooks to create an appropriate visualization and conduct further analysis in Python.

  • Computing & Digtl Technologies
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1631
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • T 07:00 PM-08:50 PM 06/17 - 07/26
  • CDDF,CDTD,OLF,ZIMB,

Kristopher Johnson

CDT 31420 | Photography I
Kristopher Johnson

BA Core Option/BFA Core. MATERIALS FEE. This course is an introduction to the theory and practice of still photography. It is designed for all students interested in developing their photographic skills and also serves as the entry-level sequence for the photo major in studio art. The course is based on the use of digital cameras. Adobe Lightroom software and professional quality inkjet printing. Creative assignments introduce students to various thematic approaches including documentary work and portraits. Presentations cover both historical and contemporary approaches to the medium. A digital SLR camera with manual controls is highly recommended; or students may check out departmental cameras to complete assignments. A portable hard drive compatible with the Apple OS platform is required for storing personal files.

  • Computing & Digtl Technologies
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1760
  • 0 of 2 enrolled
  • MWR 04:00 PM-06:00 PM 06/03 - 07/26
  • CDDA,CDDF,OLF,WKAL, FNAR

Nuno Moniz

CDT 60710 | History of A.I.
Nuno Moniz

How can we discuss the present and future of Artificial Intelligence if we don't understand its past and how we arrived at our current situation? As the pervasiveness of Artificial Intelligence (AI) in our lives and society reaches new levels, new and old questions arise, demonstrating the urgency in equipping present and future generations with tools to understand the evolution of AI better. For over 70 years, AI has provided us with an enthusiastic sequence of events beyond the continuous cycles of hype and disillusion. Understanding how these events unfolded is crucial to understanding and debating AI today and foreseeing its future applications and challenges. The "History of Artificial Intelligence" course has three main learning goals: 1) identify critical events that influenced the rise of AI and align them with the history of related scientific disciplines; 2) describe the various phases of AI's evolution and context and discuss their influence in present discussions; and, 3) reflect on AI's ethical/societal implications and critique current/possible applications.

  • Computing & Digtl Technologies
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2237
  • 1 of 10 enrolled
  • MT 10:00 AM-11:30 AM 06/10 - 07/19
  • OLF,ZIMB,

Peter Bui

CSE 30872 | Programming Challenges
Peter Bui

This course encourages the development of practical programming and problem solving skills through extensive practice and guided learning. The bulk of the class revolves around solving "brain-teaser" and puzzle-type problems that often appear in programming contests, online challenges, and job interviews. Topics covered in this course include: performing I/O, processing strings, using data structures, performing searching and sorting, utilizing recursion, manipulating graphs, and applying advanced algorithmic techniques such as dynamic programming. Additionally, basic software engineering practices such as debugging, testing, and source code management will be utilized throughout the course.

  • Computer Science and Engr.
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1974
  • 25 of 30 enrolled
  • MW 07:30 PM-09:00 PM 06/03 - 07/26
  • OLF,ZIMB,

Valentina Kuskova

CSE 40647 | Data Science
Valentina Kuskova

Data mining and machine learning techniques have been widely used in many domains. The focus of this course will primarily be on fundamental concepts and methods in data science, with relevant inclusions and references from probability, statistics, pattern recognition, databases, and information theory. The course will give students an opportunity to implement and experiment with some of the concepts (e.g., classification, clustering, frequent pattern mining), and also apply them to the real-world data sets.

  • Computer Science and Engr.
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1909
  • 6 of 16 enrolled
  • TR 07:00 PM-09:00 PM 06/03 - 07/26
  • OLF,

Michael Wicks

CSE 40693 | Modern Web Development
Michael Wicks

This course will focus on topics of modern web app development such as: MVC vs Component-based app architecture, RESTful API development, database schema design, interfacing with third-party APIs and more. In addition, many common JavaScript paradigms will be covered including asynchronous programming patterns, object-oriented JavaScript with classes, and unit testing. Discussions of engineering trade-offs will be complemented by projects in which students will develop their own web apps. These techniques are used by companies such as Groupon, Airbnb, Netflix, Medium and PayPal which have all adopted a full stack JavaScript approach, and are very useful to those interested in smaller tech startups as well.

  • Computer Science and Engr.
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1647
  • 11 of 17 enrolled
  • TR 05:00 PM-06:30 PM 06/03 - 07/26
  • OLF,

Valentina Kuskova

CSE 60647 | Data Science
Valentina Kuskova

Data mining and machine learning techniques have been widely used in many domains. The focus of this course will primarily be on fundamental concepts and methods in data science, with relevant inclusions and references from probability, statistics, pattern recognition, databases, and information theory. The course will give students an opportunity to implement and experiment with some of the concepts (e.g., classification, clustering, frequent pattern mining), and also apply them to the real-world data sets.

  • Computer Science and Engr.
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2038
  • 8 of 10 enrolled
  • TR 07:00 PM-09:00 PM 06/03 - 07/26
  • OLF,

Michael Wicks

CSE 60693 | Modern Web Development
Michael Wicks

This course will focus on topics of modern web app development such as: MVC vs Component-based app architecture,RESTful API development, database schema design, interfacing with third-party APIs and more. In addition, manycommon JavaScript paradigms will be covered including asynchronous programming patterns, object-oriented JavaScript with classes, and unit testing. Discussions of engineering trade-offs will be complemented by projects in which students will develop their own web apps. These techniques are used by companies such as Groupon, Airbnb, Netflix, Medium and PayPal which have all adopted a full stack JavaScript approach, and are very useful to those interested in smaller tech startups as well.

  • Computer Science and Engr.
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1757
  • 8 of 19 enrolled
  • TR 05:00 PM-06:30 PM 06/03 - 07/26
  • OLF,

Jason Daniels

DESN 20101 | VCD 1: Fundamentals of Design
Jason Daniels

MATERIALS FEE. Fundamentals of Design is a gateway course for Visual Communication Design that introduces students to design elements like color, form, composition, hierarchy, scale, rhythm, typography, and visual metaphor as a form of knowledge production, documentation, and communication. Historic and contemporary cultural literacy in design is emphasized. Print and screen-based projects will familiarize students with the process of problem discovery, creation, setting, and solving. Presentations, critiques, reading assignments, and class discussions allow the student to develop a vocabulary and a critical framework for speaking about design. We will investigate the use of visual metaphors in order to transmit meaning and value.

  • Design
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1624
  • 5 of 9 enrolled
  • MW 06:00 PM-07:00 PM 06/03 - 07/26
  • 2DCO,OLF,WKAL,ZIMB, FNAR

Jason Daniels

DESN 21102 | VCD Software Tutorial
Jason Daniels

This one-credit course will focus on Adobe Creative Suite software. The class will meet once per week throughout the course of the semester. Programs and topics to be covered will be Adobe Photoshop, InDesign, Adobe Illustrator, proper file preparation, and font access and usage.

  • Design
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1625
  • 5 of 9 enrolled
  • R 06:00 PM-07:00 PM 06/03 - 07/26
  • OLF,

Jason Daniels

DESN 60101 | VCD 1: Fundamentals of Design
Jason Daniels

MATERIALS FEE. Fundamentals of Design is a gateway course for Visual Communication Design that introduces students to basic design elements like color, form, composition and typography. This course explores and helps develop an understanding of the delicate balance between these design elements and how they have been skillfully used over time to create some of the most persuasive images and enduring messages. The course is an exercise in deconstruction and reconstruction of visual images using design elements as tools. Through assignments, students will work digitally to explore color, form, composition, texture and typography; first individually and then in conjunction with other elements. Initial assignments will be short and will focus on the understanding of a singular element. As the course progresses, students will be expected to use experiences from these short assignments and use them as building block for more complex projects. Above all, the course builds a vigorous foundation that allows students to acquire visual skillsets that serve as a firm foundation for advanced level courses in Visual Communication Design.

  • Design
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2313
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • MW 06:00 PM-07:00 PM 06/03 - 07/26
  • OLF,WKAL, FNAR

Jason Daniels

DESN 61102 | VCD Software Tutorial
Jason Daniels

This zero-credit course will focus on Adobe Creative Suite software. The class will meet one evening per week throughout the course of the semester. Programs and topics to be covered will be Adobe Photoshop, InDesign, Adobe Illustrator, proper file preparation, and font access and usage.

  • Design
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 2315
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • R 06:00 PM-07:00 PM 06/03 - 07/26
  • OLF,

Carolyn Hardin

DS 60301 | Storytelling and Communication
Carolyn Hardin

In this course, students explore ethical frameworks, guidelines, and codes while considering how they integrate with the data science process. Existing research ethics standards provide a necessary but insufficient foundation for data science and data analytics, and so the goal of this course is to apply a critical lens to the standards in place and then learn how data scientists can further the mission of social good through ethical practices. Students will examine rapidly-changing technologies, conflicts, legal landscapes, and desires that emerge from new data practices.

  • Data Science
  • 1.5 credits    CRN 1677
  • 31 of 50 enrolled
  • TBA 05/20 - 06/17
  • OLF,ZIMB,

Matthew Sisk

DS 60305 | Ethics and Policy in DS
Matthew Sisk

Data-informed decision-making has created new opportunities, e.g. personalized marketing and recommendations, but also expands the set of possible risks, e.g. privacy, security, etc.; this is especially true for businesses collecting, storing, and analyzing human data. Organizations need to consider the "should we?" question with regard to data and analytics, and not just be concerned with "can we?". In this course, we will explore ethical frameworks, guidelines, codes, and checklists, and also consider how they apply to all phases of the data science process. Existing research ethics standards provide a necessary but insufficient foundation when doing data science and analytics. Together, we will wrestle with the rapidly-changing capabilities, conflicts, and desires that emerge from new data practices. Upon completion of the course, you will be able to identify and balance: what an organization wants to do from a business perspective, can do from technical and legal perspectives, and should do from an ethical perspective.

  • Data Science
  • 1.5 credits    CRN 1735
  • 31 of 50 enrolled
  • TBA 06/24 - 07/22
  • OLF,ZIMB,

Christopher Frederick

DS 60620 | Databases
Christopher Frederick

Calibrated to data science applications, this course focuses on effective techniques for storing, retrieving, and processing structured, semi-structured, and unstructured data in a big data environment. Students build on their experience with R and Python to access data from a variety of sources such as Relational Databases, SQL, NoSQL, and graph databases such as Neo4j. Students will work with big data using platforms such as Apache Spark and Databricks. The course also introduces students to the fundamental concepts of cybersecurity and privacy relevant to data science.

  • Data Science
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1734
  • 31 of 50 enrolled
  • TBA 05/23 - 07/25
  • OLF,ZIMB,

Eva Dziadula

ECON 10020 | Principles of Macroeconomics
Eva Dziadula

A continuation of introduction to economics with emphasis on the measurement of national economic performance, alternative explanations of short-run economic fluctuations and long-run economic growth, money and credit, fiscal and monetary policy.

  • Economics
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1632
  • 1 of 8 enrolled
  • MTR 08:00 PM-09:50 PM 06/10 - 07/26
  • OLF,ZFYS,ZIMB, WKSS

Eva Dziadula

ECON 20020 | Principles of Macroeconomics
Eva Dziadula

A continuation of introduction to economics with emphasis on the measurement of national economic perfomance, alternative explanations of short-run economic fluctuations and long-run economic growth, money and credit, fiscal and monetary policy.

  • Economics
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1633
  • 13 of 17 enrolled
  • MTR 08:00 PM-09:50 PM 06/10 - 07/26
  • OLF,ZFTY,ZIMB, WKSS

Forrest Spence

ECON 48100 | Senior Research Project
Forrest Spence

The Senior Research Project is a required course for all International Economics majors. Students will produce a high quality research paper combining their language and culture studies with economics. Students will learn about research methods and writing. Instructive feedback and guidance will be provided by the professor throughout the research and writing process.

  • Economics
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2293
  • 1 of 1 enrolled
  • TBA 06/10 - 07/19
  • ECWI,MPPE,OLF, WRIT

Elizabeth Roycroft, Kati Macaluso

EDU 67980 | Special Topics in Education
Elizabeth Roycroft, Kati Macaluso

This course provides an opportunity for students to explore issues and experiences in education with the approval of the Academic Director.

  • Education
  • 1.03.0 credits    CRN 1305
  • 2 of 15 enrolled
  • OLF,

Christine Bonfiglio, Abby Giroux, Monica Choquette

EDU 70200 | Foundation in Inclusive Ed
Christine Bonfiglio, Abby Giroux, Monica Choquette

An introduction to inclusive education is provided with a focus on understanding learner attributes, including academic, behavioral, social/emotional, and health issues. Historical, philosophical, and ethical perspectives serve as a foundation for understanding learner strengths and challenges. Evidence-based frameworks and inclusive practices that seek to address complex learning needs are emphasized.

  • Education
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1250
  • 23 of 35 enrolled
  • MWF 01:00 PM-04:00 PM 05/20 - 06/30
  • ACE4,OLF,

Christine Bonfiglio, Abby Giroux, Nacia Hatch

EDU 70202 | Collaboration, Community & Cul
Christine Bonfiglio, Abby Giroux, Nacia Hatch

Critical elements of professional collaboration and consultation within a multi-tiered system of support are addressed. Communication, roles/responsibilities, and culture of key stakeholders are a central focus. Teaming and problem-solving models are examined to address the needs of students who struggle in the classroom environment. Clinical experiences are required.

  • Education
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 1252
  • 15 of 35 enrolled
  • MTWRF 03:00 PM-04:00 PM 06/10 - 07/07
  • ACE4,OLF,

Amber Ray, Abby Giroux, Christine Bonfiglio, Erika Irlbeck

EDU 70205 | Assessment & Decisions
Amber Ray, Abby Giroux, Christine Bonfiglio, Erika Irlbeck

Through the lens of multi-tiered systems of support (MTSS), formal and informal academic assessments of learning issues are provided. Selecting and implementing appropriate diagnostic measures with data analysis is applied to make informed data-based instructional decisions. Collaborative team processes and eligibility decisions are overviewed.

  • Education
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 2253
  • 23 of 35 enrolled
  • MTWRF 03:00 PM-04:00 PM 07/01 - 07/26
  • OLF,ZIMB,

Bryan Santin

ENGL 20157 | Free Speech
Bryan Santin

This introductory course surveys the core texts, doctrines, ideas, and cultural controversies related to First Amendment protections for free expression. We will be especially interested in some large questions: what is expression? How have our ideas of freedom of expression evolved as we enter the digital age? What kind of expression should be permissible? What happens when the public forum is fully online? What is the relationship between free expression and democratic-self government? Is there a difference between individual, group, and government speech? How do we navigate alternative ways of thinking about free expression in a global media ecosystem? We will consider a selection of exemplary cases, controversies, and literary texts: among our topics will include the following: the transformation of speech in the age of digital media; libel, satire and parody; piracy, intellectual property and copyright; privacy and surveillance; hate speech and incitement; obscenity and pornography. We will investigate the topic by studying relevant case law, literary texts (including fiction, film and new media), political philosophy, and information policy? Disclaimer: you will encounter speech that is potentially offensive and discomforting in this course. Note: this course is delivered fully online. The course design combines required live weekly meetings online with self-scheduled lectures, problems, assignments, and interactive learning materials. To participate, students will need to have a computer with webcam, reliable internet connection, and a quiet place to participate in live sessions.

  • English
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1668
  • 19 of 28 enrolled
  • MW 07:30 PM-09:30 PM 06/17 - 07/26
  • OLF,WKAL, LIT

Nathaniel Myers

ENGL 30060 | Shakespeare and Film
Nathaniel Myers

This course explores the phenomenon of Shakespeare and film, concentrating on the ranges of meaning provoked by the conjunction. We shall be looking at examples of films of Shakespeare plays both early and recent, both in English and in other languages, and both ones that stick close to the conventionalized and historicized conceptualizations of Shakespeare and adaptations at varying degrees of distance toward the erasure of Shakespeare from the text. The transportation of different forms of Shakespearean textualities (printed, theatrical, filmic) and the confrontation with the specificities of film produce a cultural phenomenon whose cultural meanings - meanings as Shakespeare and meanings as film - will be the subject of our investigations. Students will be required to view screenings of films on a regular basis during the semester. Note: this course is delivered fully online. The course design combines required live weekly meetings online with self-scheduled lectures, problems, assignments, and interactive learning materials. To participate, students will need to have a computer with webcam, reliable internet connection, and a quiet place to participate in live sessions. Students who will be on the Main campus or residing in the Michiana region are not eligible to enroll in this course. Cannot have taken: FTT 40600 , FTT 44600, FTT 60600

  • English
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1827
  • 3 of 3 enrolled
  • MW 07:00 PM-08:30 PM 06/03 - 07/26
  • OLF,WKAL, FNAR

Bryan Santin

ENGL 40158 | Free Speech
Bryan Santin

This introductory course surveys the core texts, doctrines, ideas, and cultural controversies related to First Amendment protections for free expression. We will be especially interested in some large questions: what is expression? How have our ideas of freedom of expression evolved as we enter the digital age? What kind of expression should be permissible? What happens when the public forum is fully online? What is the relationship between free expression and democratic-self government? Is there a difference between individual, group, and government speech? How do we navigate alternative ways of thinking about free expression in a global media ecosystem? We will consider a selection of exemplary cases, controversies, and literary texts: among our topics will include the following: the transformation of speech in the age of digital media; libel, satire and parody; piracy, intellectual property and copyright; privacy and surveillance; hate speech and incitement; obscenity and pornography. We will investigate the topic by studying relevant case law, literary texts (including fiction, film and new media), political philosophy, and information policy? Disclaimer: you will encounter speech that is potentially offensive and discomforting in this course. Note: this course is delivered fully online. The course design combines required live weekly meetings online with self-scheduled lectures, problems, assignments, and interactive learning materials. To participate, students will need to have a computer with webcam, reliable internet connection, and a quiet place to participate in live sessions.

  • English
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1839
  • 1 of 2 enrolled
  • MW 07:30 PM-09:30 PM 06/17 - 07/26
  • OLF,

James Leady

FIN 20150 | Foundations of Finance
James Leady

This course is required for finance majors and a grade of "C" or higher is a prerequisite for continuing in the finance major. The course provides an in-depth and quantitative examination of the principles of financial decision-making. Students learn the concept of value maximization, mathematics of finance, valuation of financial securities, capital investment evaluation, the estimation of required rates of return, and the theory of capital structure. This course cannot be taken Pass/Fail.

  • Finance
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1879
  • 49 of 50 enrolled
  • MW 06:30 PM-08:30 PM 06/12 - 07/26
  • BA02,BCOR,OLF,ZIMB,

Kristen Collett-Schmitt

FIN 30210 | Managerial Economics
Kristen Collett-Schmitt

This course provides a coordination of economic theory and managerial practice. Topics covered include: consumer demand, production functions, cost behavior, output determination, and pricing within various market structures.

  • Finance
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1652
  • 28 of 50 enrolled
  • TR 08:00 PM-09:55 PM 06/03 - 07/15
  • BA03,OLF,ZIMB, WKSS

Nathaniel Myers

FTT 30600 | Shakespeare and Film
Nathaniel Myers

This course explores the phenomenon of Shakespeare and film, concentrating on the ranges of meaning provoked by the conjunction. We shall be looking at examples of films of Shakespeare plays both early and recent, both in English and in other languages, and both ones that stick close to the conventionalized and historicized conceptualizations of Shakespeare and adaptations at varying degrees of distance toward the erasure of Shakespeare from the text. The transportation of different forms of Shakespearean textualities (printed, theatrical, filmic) and the confrontation with the specificities of film produce a cultural phenomenon whose cultural meanings - meanings as Shakespeare and meanings as film - will be the subject of our investigations. Students will be required to view screenings of films on a regular basis during the semester. Note: this course is delivered fully online. The course design combines required live weekly meetings online with self-scheduled lectures, problems, assignments, and interactive learning materials. To participate, students will need to have a computer with webcam, reliable internet connection, and a quiet place to participate in live sessions. Students who will be on the Main campus or residing in the Michiana region are not eligible to enroll in this course. Cannot have taken: FTT 40600 , FTT 44600, FTT 60600

  • Film, Television, and Theatre
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1648
  • 17 of 25 enrolled
  • MW 07:00 PM-08:30 PM 06/03 - 07/26
  • MESE,OLF,WKAL, FNAR

Anre Venter, Theodore Mandell

FTT 30635 | Drunk on Film
Anre Venter, Theodore Mandell

Long Title: Drunk on Film: The Psychology of Storytelling with Alcohol and Its Effects on Alcohol Consumption. Alcohol Use Disorder is a chronic relapsing brain disease. But when presented on screen, it's entertainment. Why do we laugh, why do we cry, why do we emulate fictional characters whose drinking habits result in a life of debilitating addiction? From James Bond to Jonah Hill, the psychology and seduction of alcohol on film, television, and online will be analyzed. Furthermore, what is the relationship between the manner in which alcohol use/abuse is presented on screen and the manner in which alcohol is used and abused on, for example, college campuses? Surveying recent film history, we will examine how alcohol is used in story structure, as a character flaw or strength, and as a narrative device in the story arc of films across multiple film genres, (action/adventure, comedy, romance, etc). Why do characters drink, where do they drink, and how does the result of their "getting drunk" advance the narrative? We'll also look at non-fiction films that tackle issues of addiction, as a way of comparing character development in Hollywood films to the results of this same behavior in everyday life. Film materials will include weekly screenings outside of class, and academic articles relating to portrayal and analysis of alcohol use in film and television, including the business of marketing alcohol in print and television advertising. From the psychological perspective we will discuss the topic and process of social influence and how the presence of others influences our behavior. Questions of interest will include the following: what are the mechanisms by which group influence unfolds? How and why might we be persuaded? Does the manner, and if so how, in which alcohol use is portrayed in movies and the media reflect the processes and principles of social influence? Readings will include chapters on social influence, persuasion and academic articles evaluating the manner in which alcohol is portrayed and advertised and the effect this has on alcohol consumption. In addition, issues of addiction will be discussed - from understanding the basis of addiction to examining the efficacy of addiction treatment.

  • Film, Television, and Theatre
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1616
  • 16 of 30 enrolled
  • MTWR 04:30 PM-07:00 PM 06/17 - 07/11
  • OLF,ZIMB, WKIN

Robert Norton

GE 60501 | German Graduate Reading
Robert Norton

Intended as review for graduate students who wish to take the GRE in German. The final examination of the course, if passed, fulfills the requirements of the GRE. Open to undergraduate students by permission of the instructor.

  • German
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2129
  • 13 of 30 enrolled
  • MTWR 10:00 AM-11:40 AM 06/03 - 07/11
  • OLF,

Sharon Yoon

GLAF 20109 | Global Korea
Sharon Yoon

What does it mean to be Korean? How are definitions of Korea and ?Koreanness? affected by recent waves of globalization and migration? This course investigates the social construction of race and nationhood within the context of South Korea. While many believe South Korea to be ethnically and racially homogeneous, the country has increasingly opened up its borders to foreign migration to offset the adverse impact of its rapidly aging society. More than one in ten marriages in South Korea involves a foreign-born person today, and growing numbers of racially mixed people consider themselves Korean. In addition, members of the Korean diaspora have started to ?return? to their country of origin in recent years, only to find that they are marginalized because of their culturally different backgrounds. This course introduces students to sociological theories of race, ethnicity, and nationhood by analyzing how South Koreans define self and Other. We will learn how racial and ethnic identities continue to evolve as the contexts of migration change. We will also learn why it is difficult for individuals of particular backgrounds to find a sense of belonging in the societies in which they live and work.

  • Global Affairs
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2257
  • 2 of 8 enrolled
  • MW 08:00 PM-09:30 PM 06/03 - 07/26
  • GLEL,GLRF,OLF, WKSS

Matthew Capdevielle

GRED 68002 | Article Accelerator
Matthew Capdevielle

The summer session Article Accelerator is an 8-week course designed to help graduate students and postdocs make consistent progress toward revising an existing piece of writing, such as a conference paper, seminar paper, or dissertation chapter, into an article manuscript ready to be submitted to a journal. Students will be assigned reading from Wendy Laura Belcher's book Writing Your Journal Article in Twelve Weeks and meet weekly to discuss the reading, check in with peers on progress and productivity, and participate in drafting and peer-editing exercises designed to model good article-preparation practices alongside Belcher's recommendations.

  • Graduate Education
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 1619
  • 9 of 20 enrolled
  • TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM 06/03 - 07/26
  • OLF,

Pamela Butler

GSC 10001 | Introduction to Gender Studies
Pamela Butler

This course provides students with an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of gender studies. It also serves as an introduction to gender itself?gender as identity, as a social/cultural formation, as a mode of self-expression, and as a critical lens through which to better understand the world. We will explore how gender is experienced, produced, and performed at the intersection of culture, politics, and the body, always in conjunction with other factors of power and difference such as race, nation, sexuality, dis/ability, and socioeconomic class. We will ask how institutions like government, work, and family interact with gender in the U.S. and in local contexts around the world. We will think critically about how ideology (systems of ideas and knowledge) and representation (portrayals in media, political discourse, and everyday life) shape our understanding of gender. The study of gender reaches into, across, and beyond academic disciplines. This course will explore how research on gender is done both within the interdisciplinary field of gender/women/sexuality studies and across many other fields, taking up debates and conversations about gender from history, sociology, anthropology, biology, literature, philosophy, political science, geography, and other disciplines that engage gender as a subject of knowledge.

  • Gender Studies
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2249
  • 11 of 16 enrolled
  • MW 04:00 PM-05:30 PM 06/03 - 07/26
  • ALSS,OLF, WKSS

Daniel Hobbins

HIST 30267 | The Middle Ages on Film
Daniel Hobbins

This course will explore modern popular imaginings of the Middle Ages through film. We will view several feature-length films and numerous clips, interspersed with readings from and about the Middle Ages. Together we will discuss and analyze both the texts and films. The films will range from early silent films to Monty Python spoofs to recent blockbusters. I have divided the course into six segments: (1) the Crusades; (2) Eleanor of Aquitaine: wife and mother of kings; (3) Robin Hood; (4) King Arthur; (5) the Black Death; and (6) Joan of Arc Students will write short daily assignments, two short essays, and a final paper or take-home exam. There are two required textbooks and a course packet. The textbooks are Robert Brent Toplin, Reel History: In Defense of Hollywood (2002); and Daniel Hobbins (trans.), The Trial of Joan of Arc.

  • History
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1339
  • 11 of 16 enrolled
  • MR 07:30 PM-08:45 PM 06/03 - 07/26
  • HBEU,HCT2,HPRE,HTME,OLF, WKHI

James Lundberg

HIST 30671 | Lincoln, Slavery, Civil War
James Lundberg

This course asks how we should narrate and understand the great ordeal of Civil War and emancipation. Reading both primary and secondary sources, it considers the Civil War era and life of Abraham Lincoln in light of the rise of abolition and antislavery politics; attitudes toward race, slavery, and labor; the political and social meanings of war and emancipation; the political and social challenge of reconstructing the nation amidst the tangled legacies of racial slavery and a destructive war.

  • History
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2146
  • 12 of 20 enrolled
  • MR 05:15 PM-06:45 PM 06/03 - 07/26
  • HBNA,HCT5,HTRA,HTWS,OLF, WKHI

Peter Cajka

HIST 30762 | The Vietnam War&Amer Catholics
Peter Cajka

How did the most divisive war in American History shape the nation's biggest church community? This course explores Catholics as both supporters and detractors of the Vietnam War. American Catholics wished to see America defeat Communism but, importantly, the power of faith motivated many to criticize the state's escalation of the conflict. Students will explore the tensions and transformations of this important moment in American life. Lectures and classroom discussions will address decolonization, the global and national nature of American Catholicism, the power of the liberal state, conscientious objection, the "Spirit of the Sixties," sacramental protests, the rise of human rights, geopolitics, and the Cold War. Course readings will include the latest scholarship, but also primary sources like poems, films, songs, letters, prayers, newspaper articles, and art. Students will have access to the rich materials of Catholic peace activists found in the University of Notre Dame Archives

  • History
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1990
  • 2 of 4 enrolled
  • MW 07:00 PM-09:00 PM 06/03 - 07/26
  • OLF, WKCD,WKHI

Robert Lewandowski

ITAO 30100 | Foundations of Bus Analytics
Robert Lewandowski

Business Analytics allows us to make sense of what we see in the real world by using data and a systematic approach to solve real problems and make business decisions. This course provides the fundamental concepts and methods needed to understand the emerging role of business analytics in organizations. You will learn how to properly plan an analytics strategy, collect data, analyze the data and report findings through visualizations and storytelling. Having a strong understanding of concepts in this course will give you a strong foundation in all the areas that support analytics and will help you to better position yourself for success in the remainder of the Business Analytics major and beyond.

  • IT, Analytics and Operations
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2140
  • 18 of 20 enrolled
  • TR 07:00 PM-08:40 PM 06/03 - 07/26
  • BBRD,OLF,ZTST,

Sharon Yoon

KSGA 20300 | Global Korea
Sharon Yoon

What does it mean to be Korean? How are definitions of Korea and ?Koreanness? affected by recent waves of globalization and migration? This course investigates the social construction of race and nationhood within the context of South Korea. While many believe South Korea to be ethnically and racially homogeneous, the country has increasingly opened up its borders to foreign migration to offset the adverse impact of its rapidly aging society. More than one in ten marriages in South Korea involves a foreign-born person today, and growing numbers of racially mixed people consider themselves Korean. In addition, members of the Korean diaspora have started to ?return? to their country of origin in recent years, only to find that they are marginalized because of their culturally different backgrounds. This course introduces students to sociological theories of race, ethnicity, and nationhood by analyzing how South Koreans define self and Other. We will learn how racial and ethnic identities continue to evolve as the contexts of migration change. We will also learn why it is difficult for individuals of particular backgrounds to find a sense of belonging in the societies in which they live and work.

  • Keough School - Global Affairs
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2234
  • 2 of 10 enrolled
  • MW 08:00 PM-09:30 PM 06/03 - 07/26
  • GLBC,OLF, WKSS

Sharon Yoon

LLEA 20300 | Global Korea
Sharon Yoon

What does it mean to be Korean? How are definitions of Korea and ?Koreanness? affected by recent waves of globalization and migration? This course investigates the social construction of race and nationhood within the context of South Korea. While many believe South Korea to be ethnically and racially homogeneous, the country has increasingly opened up its borders to foreign migration to offset the adverse impact of its rapidly aging society. More than one in ten marriages in South Korea involves a foreign-born person today, and growing numbers of racially mixed people consider themselves Korean. In addition, members of the Korean diaspora have started to ?return? to their country of origin in recent years, only to find that they are marginalized because of their culturally different backgrounds. This course introduces students to sociological theories of race, ethnicity, and nationhood by analyzing how South Koreans define self and Other. We will learn how racial and ethnic identities continue to evolve as the contexts of migration change. We will also learn why it is difficult for individuals of particular backgrounds to find a sense of belonging in the societies in which they live and work.

  • East Asian Lang & Lit
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2256
  • 1 of 2 enrolled
  • MW 08:00 PM-09:30 PM 06/03 - 07/26
  • OLF, WKSS

Mitchell Olsen

MARK 20100 | Foundations of Marketing
Mitchell Olsen

A study of markets, institutions, and the environment in which business firms operate with attention to the effect these facets, forces, and issues have on the firm's overall marketing strategy.

  • Marketing
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2226
  • 23 of 30 enrolled
  • MW 07:30 PM-09:00 PM 05/20 - 06/27
  • BA02,BCOR,OLF,

Susan Kleiser

MARK 30100 | Consumer Orgzntnl Buyer Behav
Susan Kleiser

An investigation of the decision-making process of consumer and organizational buyers. The course considers the social, cultural, psychological, and economic dimensions of behavior as they apply to the acquisition of goods and services.

  • Marketing
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2206
  • 5 of 25 enrolled
  • TWR 05:00 PM-06:30 PM 06/17 - 07/26
  • BAMC,OLF,

Robert Essig

MARK 30650 | Contemporary Sales Management
Robert Essig

A study of the role of the salesperson and the function of sales management in creating close and productive buyer-seller relationships in the business-to-business domain. Emphases in the course are placed on trends affecting the sales person's role, the effects of the internal and external environment on the selling function, and the value of the salesperson to the firm and society.

  • Marketing
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2207
  • 6 of 50 enrolled
  • TR 07:00 PM-08:30 PM 06/03 - 07/26
  • BAMC,OLF,

Ethan Reed

MATH 10360 | Calculus B
Ethan Reed

This is the second course of the two-semester Calculus sequence for Life and Social science majors. Calculus B emphasizes the process of problem solving and application of calculus to the natural sciences, and requires students to think deeper about the concepts covered. Students will acquire basic skills needed for quantitative approach to scientific problems. The course introduces the mathematics needed to study change in a quantity. Topics include integration techniques, application of integrals to physics, geometry and ecology, solution of differential equations and their applications, and Taylor series. REQUIRED: A tablet and pencil is a necessary part of the course. Please make sure you have a device to be able to share written work. We encourage an iPad and Apple Pencil.

  • Mathematics
  • 4.0 credits    CRN 1602
  • 19 of 35 enrolled
  • MW 10:00 AM-12:00 PM 06/03 - 07/26
  • OLF,ZFYS,ZIMB, WKQR

Katherine Novey, Ethan Reed

MATH 10360 | Calculus B
Katherine Novey, Ethan Reed

This is the second course of the two-semester Calculus sequence for Life and Social science majors. Calculus B emphasizes the process of problem solving and application of calculus to the natural sciences, and requires students to think deeper about the concepts covered. Students will acquire basic skills needed for quantitative approach to scientific problems. The course introduces the mathematics needed to study change in a quantity. Topics include integration techniques, application of integrals to physics, geometry and ecology, solution of differential equations and their applications, and Taylor series. REQUIRED: A tablet and pencil is a necessary part of the course. Please make sure you have a device to be able to share written work. We encourage an iPad and Apple Pencil.

  • Mathematics
  • 4.0 credits    CRN 1603
  • 27 of 40 enrolled
  • MW 07:00 PM-09:00 PM 06/03 - 07/26
  • OLF,ZFYS,ZIMB, WKQR

Yufei Zhang

MATH 10560 | Calculus II
Yufei Zhang

For students in science and engineering. Topics include sets, functions, limits, continuity, derivatives, integrals, and applications. Also covered are transcendental functions and their inverses, infinite sequences and series, parameterized curves in the plane, and polar coordinates. A tablet and pen are required for online sections.

  • Mathematics
  • 4.0 credits    CRN 1607
  • 13 of 30 enrolled
  • MW 10:00 AM-12:00 PM 06/03 - 07/26
  • OLF,ZFYS, WKQR

Katherine Ellman-Aspnes, Yufei Zhang

MATH 10560 | Calculus II
Katherine Ellman-Aspnes, Yufei Zhang

For students in science and engineering. Topics include sets, functions, limits, continuity, derivatives, integrals, and applications. Also covered are transcendental functions and their inverses, infinite sequences and series, parameterized curves in the plane, and polar coordinates. A tablet and pen are required for online sections.

  • Mathematics
  • 4.0 credits    CRN 1841
  • 11 of 30 enrolled
  • MW 07:00 PM-09:00 PM 06/03 - 07/26
  • OLF,ZFYS, WKQR

Annie Holden

MATH 20550 | Calculus III
Annie Holden

A comprehensive treatment of differential and integral calculus of several variables. Topics include space curves, surfaces, functions of several variables, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, line integrals, surface integrals, Stokes theorem, and applications. REQUIRED: A tablet and pencil is a necessary part of the course. Please make sure you have a device to be able to share written work. We encourage an iPad and Apple Pencil.

  • Mathematics
  • 3.5 credits    CRN 1600
  • 14 of 30 enrolled
  • MW 10:00 AM-12:00 PM 06/03 - 07/26
  • CHSE,NBSE,OLF,ZFTY,ZIMB, WKQR

Audriana Houtz, Annie Holden

MATH 20550 | Calculus III
Audriana Houtz, Annie Holden

A comprehensive treatment of differential and integral calculus of several variables. Topics include space curves, surfaces, functions of several variables, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, line integrals, surface integrals, Stokes theorem, and applications. REQUIRED: A tablet and pencil is a necessary part of the course. Please make sure you have a device to be able to share written work. We encourage an iPad and Apple Pencil.

  • Mathematics
  • 3.5 credits    CRN 1601
  • 10 of 30 enrolled
  • MW 07:00 PM-09:00 PM 06/03 - 07/26
  • CHSE,NBSE,OLF,ZFTY,ZIMB, WKQR

Emanuela Marangone

MATH 20580 | Intro Linear Alg and Diff Eqtn
Emanuela Marangone

An introduction to linear algebra and to first-and second-order differential equations. Topics include elementary matrices, LU factorization, QR factorization, the matrix of a linear transformation, change of basis, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, solving first-order differential equations and second-order linear differential equations, and initial value problems. This course is part of a two-course sequence that continues with Math 30650 (325). Credit is not given for both Math 20580 (228) and Math 20610 (221). REQUIRED: A tablet and pencil is a necessary part of the course. Please make sure you have a device to be able to share written work. We encourage an iPad and Apple Pencil.

  • Mathematics
  • 3.5 credits    CRN 1604
  • 10 of 20 enrolled
  • MW 10:00 AM-12:00 PM 06/03 - 07/26
  • CHSE,OLF,ZIMB, WKQR

Roger Murray, Emanuela Marangone

MATH 20580 | Intro Linear Alg and Diff Eqtn
Roger Murray, Emanuela Marangone

An introduction to linear algebra and to first-and second-order differential equations. Topics include elementary matrices, LU factorization, QR factorization, the matrix of a linear transformation, change of basis, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, solving first-order differential equations and second-order linear differential equations, and initial value problems. This course is part of a two-course sequence that continues with Math 30650 (325). Credit is not given for both Math 20580 (228) and Math 20610 (221). REQUIRED: A tablet and pencil is a necessary part of the course. Please make sure you have a device to be able to share written work. We encourage an iPad and Apple Pencil.

  • Mathematics
  • 3.5 credits    CRN 1764
  • 23 of 30 enrolled
  • MW 07:00 PM-09:00 PM 06/03 - 07/26
  • CHSE,OLF,ZIMB, WKQR

Emanuela Marangone

MATH 60580 | Intro Lin Alg and Diff Eqtn
Emanuela Marangone

An introduction to linear algebra and to first-and second-order differential equations. Topics include elementary matrices, LU factorization, QR factorization, the matrix of a linear transformation, change of basis, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, solving first-order differential equations and second-order linear differential equations, and initial value problems. This course is part of a two-course sequence that continues with Math 30650 (325). Credit is not given for both Math 20580 (228) and Math 20610 (221).

  • Mathematics
  • 3.5 credits    CRN 2089
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • MW 10:00 AM-12:00 PM 06/03 - 07/26
  • CHSE,OLF, WKQR

Mitchell Olsen

MDMK 20100 | Foundations of Marketing
Mitchell Olsen

A study of markets, institutions and the environment in which business firms operate with attention to the effect these facets, forces and issues have on the firm's overall marketing strategy. Open to students in the Digital Marketing Minos.

  • Digital Marketing (MDMK)
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2228
  • 2 of 8 enrolled
  • MW 07:30 PM-09:00 PM 05/20 - 06/27
  • OLF,

Susan Kleiser

MDMK 30100 | Consumer Orgzntnl Buyer Behav
Susan Kleiser

An investigation of the decision-making process of consumer and organizational buyers. The course considers the social, cultural, psychological, and economic dimensions of behavior as they apply to the acquisition of goods and services.

  • Digital Marketing (MDMK)
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2229
  • 1 of 25 enrolled
  • TWR 05:00 PM-06:30 PM 06/17 - 07/26
  • OLF,

Abigail Hemmen

MDSC 30815 | How to (Not) Lie with Stats
Abigail Hemmen

Are stay-at-home orders effective during a pandemic? Should parents allow kids to have screen time? What role did demographic shifts play in the 2020 elections? Does the infield shift work? Modern society constantly faces questions that require data, statistics, and other empirical evidence to answer well. But the proliferation of niche media outlets, the rise of fake news, and the increase in academic research retraction makes navigating potential answers to these questions difficult. This course is designed to give students tools to confront this challenge by developing their statistical and information literacy skills. It will demonstrate how data and statistical analyses are susceptible to a wide variety of known and implicit biases, which may ultimately lead consumers of information to make problematic choices. The course will consider this issue from the perspectives of consumers of research as well as researchers themselves. We will discuss effective strategies for reading and interpreting quantitative research while considering the incentives researchers face in producing it. Ultimately, students will complete the class better equipped to evaluate empirical claims made by news outlets, social media, instructors, and their peers. The goal is to encourage students to approach data-driven answers to important questions with appropriate tools rather than blind acceptance or excessive skepticism.

  • Data Science (MDSC)
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1795
  • 2 of 5 enrolled
  • MW 06:30 PM-08:30 PM 06/03 - 07/26
  • OLF,

Daniel Hobbins

MI 30284 | The Middle Ages on Film
Daniel Hobbins

This course will explore modern popular imaginings of the Middle Ages through film. We will view several feature-length films and numerous clips, interspersed with readings from and about the Middle Ages. Together we will discuss and analyze both the texts and films. The films will range from early silent films to Monty Python spoofs to recent blockbusters. I have divided the course into six segments: (1) the Crusades; (2) Eleanor of Aquitaine: wife and mother of kings; (3) Robin Hood; (4) King Arthur; (5) the Black Death; and (6) Joan of ArcStudents will write short daily assignments, two short essays, and a final paper or take-home exam. There are two required textbooks and a course packet. The textbooks are Robert Brent Toplin, Reel History: In Defense of Hollywood (2002); and Daniel Hobbins (trans.), The Trial of Joan of Arc.

  • Medieval Institute
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1345
  • 3 of 3 enrolled
  • MR 07:30 PM-08:45 PM 06/03 - 07/26
  • OLF, WKHI

James O'Brien

MSA 60111 | Federal Taxation
James O'Brien

The purpose of the course is to provide a broad introduction to taxation. The course is designed to prepare students for the Taxes and Business Strategy Course. Major topics to be covered in this first tax course include: types of taxes, tax rates, taxes and present values, tax planning, income from business operations, individuals (basics), investment planning, nontaxable transactions and tax considerations for property acquisitions.

  • Master of Science Accountancy
  • 1.5 credits    CRN 2190
  • 5 of 5 enrolled
  • MTWRF 08:00 AM-12:00 PM 07/22 - 07/26
  • OLF,

Keith Urtel

MSA 60112 | Intermediate Accounting I
Keith Urtel

This course is the first of a two course sequence that cover intermediate level financial reporting topics. Topics covered across the two courses include: economic and institutional setting for financial reporting, accrual accounting and income determination, role of financial information in valuation, role of financial information in contracting, receivables, inventories, long-lived assets, financial instruments as liabilities, leases, pensions and post-retirement benefits, income tax reporting, and owners' equity.

  • Master of Science Accountancy
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1657
  • 6 of 20 enrolled
  • R 06:00 PM-07:30 PM 06/13 - 06/13 |TWR 05:15 PM-06:45 PM 06/18 - 06/20 |MTWR 05:15 PM-06:45 PM 06/24 - 06/27
  • OLF,

Keith Urtel

MSA 60122 | Intermediate Accounting II
Keith Urtel

This course is the first of a two course sequence that cover intermediate level financial reporting topics. Topics covered across the two courses include: economic and institutional setting for financial reporting, accrual accounting and income determination, role of financial information in valuation, role of financial information in contracting, receivables, inventories, long-lived assets, financial instruments as liabilities, leases, pensions and post-retirement benefits, income tax reporting, and owners' equity.

  • Master of Science Accountancy
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1658
  • 11 of 20 enrolled
  • T 10:30 AM-12:00 PM 07/02 - 07/02 |S 03:00 PM-04:30 PM 07/06 - 07/06 |MTRF 03:00 PM-04:30 PM 07/08 - 07/12 |WRF 03:00 PM-04:30 PM 07/17 - 07/19 |TWR 03:00 PM-04:30 PM 07/23 - 07/25
  • OLF,

James O'Brien

MSA 60141 | Federal Taxation - Immersion
James O'Brien

The purpose of the course is to provide a broad introduction to taxation. The course is designed to prepare students for the Taxes and Business Strategy Course. Major topics to be covered in this first tax course include: types of taxes, tax rates, taxes and present values, tax planning, income from business operations, individuals (basics), investment planning, nontaxable transactions and tax considerations for property acquisitions.

  • Master of Science Accountancy
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1659
  • 12 of 20 enrolled
  • TBA 06/03 - 07/19 |MTWRF 08:00 AM-12:00 PM 07/15 - 07/19
  • OLF,

Keith Urtel

MSA 60151 | Audit & Assurance Service
Keith Urtel

This course provides a conceptual framework of the principles, standards, and procedures underlying financial audits. Topics covered include: generally accepted auditing standards, materiality and audit risk thresholds, issuance of the audit report, the audit process and documentation, internal control in a financial statement audit, analytical procedures, and auditor's legal liability, including the auditor's responsibility for fraud.

  • Master of Science Accountancy
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1660
  • 13 of 20 enrolled
  • TWR 03:00 PM-05:00 PM 06/11 - 06/26
  • OLF,

Joshua Seachris, Tobias Flattery

PHIL 20101 | Introduction to Philosophy
Joshua Seachris, Tobias Flattery

A general introduction to philosophy, which may cover introductory topics in either topically or historically, with a focus on introducing students to some of the perennial problems and texts of philosophy. Specific course content varies by semester and by instructor. See https://philosophy.nd.edu/courses/1st-courses-in-philosophy/ for further details of specific sections offered this semester.

  • Philosophy
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2219
  • 24 of 24 enrolled
  • TR 10:00 AM-12:00 PM 06/03 - 07/14
  • OLF,ZIMB, WKFP

Justin Christy

PHIL 20454 | Philosophy as a Way of Life
Justin Christy

How does philosophical reasoning interact with lived practice? What is the relationship between a philosopher's metaphysical views and their ethical commitments? Can philosophy help you live a better life? In this course, we will look at a range of ancient and contemporary positions on questions like these. We will seek to understand a number of historical approaches to the philosophical life not only through in-depth reading and discussion of texts from the philosophical traditions in question, but also by trying out each tradition's distinctive practices for ourselves. The specific topics and philosophical traditions covered are subject to change. For the most up-to-date information, see the course description at https://philosophy.nd.edu/courses/2nd-courses-in-philosophy/

  • Philosophy
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1626
  • 23 of 25 enrolled
  • MW 12:00 PM-02:00 PM 06/03 - 07/26
  • OLF, WKSP

Kay Malte Bischof

PHIL 20611 | Ethics & AI
Kay Malte Bischof

Not so long ago, an engineer at Google claimed that a chatbot called LaMDA has achieved consciousness. While it may be doubtful whether this chatbot actually achieved consciousness, the chorus of technologists who believe artificial intelligence models may not be far off from achieving consciousness is getting bolder. The most recent iteration of a chatbot called ChatGPT was able to pass exams from law and business schools. It took ChatGPT no less than 2 months to reach 100 million users. (For comparison, reaching 100 million users took the mobile phone 16 years, Facebook 4 years, and TikTok a year.) Truly, we are witnessing a revolution in time lapse that increasingly confuses the boundary between reality and science fiction. In this class, we shall embark on an adventure exploring the maybe not so fictional idea of an emerging consciousness in artificial intelligence and investigate the opportunity and risk potential of using AI for our society at large. Come to class and have a conversation with the future!

  • Philosophy
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2220
  • 24 of 24 enrolled
  • MR 02:00 PM-03:30 PM 06/03 - 07/26
  • OLF, WKSP

Patrick Gamez

PHIL 20632 | Robot Ethics
Patrick Gamez

Robots or "autonomous systems" play an ever-increasing role in many areas, from weapons systems and driverless cars to health care and consumer services. As a result, it is ever more important to ask whether it makes any sense to speak of such systems' behaving ethically and how we can build into their programming what some call "ethics modules." After a brief technical introduction to the field, this course will approach these questions through contemporary philosophical literature on robot ethics and through popular media, including science fiction text and video.

  • Philosophy
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2254
  • 18 of 24 enrolled
  • MR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM 06/03 - 07/26
  • OLF,ZIMB, WKSP

Lizao Wang

PHIL 20655 | Tech and Innovation Ethics
Lizao Wang

This course will closely consider the ethical responsibilities inherent in the process of technological innovation from the perspective of the innovator. Innovation is here broadly framed as ethical and social intervention in the life of users and society rather than merely technical invention. Topics covered include the nature of responsibility, values in design, the roles of regulation and of business models, and cases from social media, AI, and robotics.

  • Philosophy
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2221
  • 22 of 24 enrolled
  • MW 06:00 PM-07:30 PM 06/03 - 07/26
  • OLF, WKSP

Mark Bourgeois

PHIL 20655 | Tech and Innovation Ethics
Mark Bourgeois

This course will closely consider the ethical responsibilities inherent in the process of technological innovation from the perspective of the innovator. Innovation is here broadly framed as ethical and social intervention in the life of users and society rather than merely technical invention. Topics covered include the nature of responsibility, values in design, the roles of regulation and of business models, and cases from social media, AI, and robotics.

  • Philosophy
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2291
  • 10 of 24 enrolled
  • TR 05:30 PM-07:00 PM 06/03 - 07/26
  • OLF, WKSP

John LoSecco

PHYS 10240 | Elementary Cosmology
John LoSecco

An elective course for students planning to major in the arts and letters or business. It is designed to acquaint the non-mathematically inclined student with the most important discoveries in physics of the last few decades and how they have altered our perceptions of the origin and structure of the universe. This course examines such questions as: "Where did the universe come from?" "Why do scientists feel sure that it was born in a cosmic fireball called the Big Bang?" and "Where did the Big Bang itself come from?" This is a reading-intensive course based on popularizations of science written for the curious and intelligent layperson. The emphasis will be on class discussion of the readings. One book report and a term paper are required in addition to examinations. Science or Engineering students who are interested in a more rigorous treatment of the topics covered in this course should consider PHYS 30240 Introduction to Cosmology.

  • Physics
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1609
  • 15 of 25 enrolled
  • MTR 05:00 PM-06:15 PM 06/03 - 07/26
  • OLF,ZFYS, WKST

Abigail Hemmen

POLS 30815 | How to (Not) Lie with Stats
Abigail Hemmen

Are stay-at-home orders effective during a pandemic? Should parents allow kids to have screen time? What role did demographic shifts play in the 2020 elections? Does the infield shift work? Modern society constantly faces questions that require data, statistics, and other empirical evidence to answer well. But the proliferation of niche media outlets, the rise of fake news, and the increase in academic research retraction makes navigating potential answers to these questions difficult. This course is designed to give students tools to confront this challenge by developing their statistical and information literacy skills. It will demonstrate how data and statistical analyses are susceptible to a wide variety of known and implicit biases, which may ultimately lead consumers of information to make problematic choices. The course will consider this issue from the perspectives of consumers of research as well as researchers themselves. We will discuss effective strategies for reading and interpreting quantitative research while considering the incentives researchers face in producing it. Ultimately, students will complete the class better equipped to evaluate empirical claims made by news outlets, social media, instructors, and their peers. The goal is to encourage students to approach data-driven answers to important questions with appropriate tools rather than blind acceptance or excessive skepticism.

  • Political Science
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1645
  • 7 of 25 enrolled
  • MW 06:30 PM-08:30 PM 06/03 - 07/26
  • OLF,ZIMB,

Bradley Gibson

PSY 10000 | Introductory Psychology
Bradley Gibson

A broad coverage of the methods and findings that characterize scientific psychology, including a description of historical and recent developments in the areas of learning and motivation; perceptual, cognitive, and physiological processes; social, personality, and child development; and abnormal behavior and clinical treatment. Open to first-year students only.

  • Psychology
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1613
  • 10 of 20 enrolled
  • TWR 07:00 PM-09:05 PM 06/17 - 07/26
  • ALSS,OLF,ZFYS, WKSS

Bradley Gibson

PSY 20000 | Introductory Psychology
Bradley Gibson

A broad coverage of the methods and findings that characterize scientific psychology, including a description of historical and recent developments in the areas of learning and motivation; perceptual, cognitive, and physiological processes; social, personality, and child development; and abnormal behavior and clinical treatment. Open only to sophomores, juniors, and seniors.

  • Psychology
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2189
  • 24 of 25 enrolled
  • TWR 07:00 PM-09:05 PM 06/17 - 07/26
  • OLF, WKSS

Bradley Gibson

PSY 30100 | Statistics Behavioral Science
Bradley Gibson

An introduction to the analysis and evaluation of experimental data, with particular emphasis on measures of central tendency, variability, and covariability and their relationship to psychological theory and explanation.

  • Psychology
  • 4.0 credits    CRN 1255
  • 18 of 20 enrolled
  • MTWR 12:30 PM-02:40 PM 06/17 - 07/26
  • OLF, WKQR

Dawn Gondoli

PSY 30220 | Adolescent Development
Dawn Gondoli

The second decade of life is a crucial developmental transition that poses significant physical, psychological and social challenges to young people; and which have implications for later psychosocial outcomes. This course explores the portrait of adolescence that is revealed by contemporary developmental science. We will examine adolescence in cultural and historical context and survey recent empirical literatures on some core topics, including pubertal maturation, the cognitive and social-personality development of teenagers, the struggle for self and identity, the influence of family, peers and schools on development, adolescent risk behavior and positive youth development, among other topics

  • Psychology
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2114
  • 8 of 18 enrolled
  • TWR 11:00 AM-01:10 PM 06/17 - 07/26
  • ALSS,NSBH,OLF,PSDP,

Anre Venter, Theodore Mandell

PSY 30635 | Drunk on Film
Anre Venter, Theodore Mandell

Long Title: Drunk on Film: The Psychology of Storytelling with Alcohol and Its Effects on Alcohol Consumption. Alcohol Use Disorder is a chronic relapsing brain disease. But when presented on screen, it's entertainment. Why do we laugh, why do we cry, why do we emulate fictional characters whose drinking habits result in a life of debilitating addiction? From James Bond to Jonah Hill, the psychology and seduction of alcohol on film, television, and online will be analyzed. Furthermore, what is the relationship between the manner in which alcohol use/abuse is presented on screen and the manner in which alcohol is used and abused on, for example, college campuses? Surveying recent film history, we will examine how alcohol is used in story structure, as a character flaw or strength, and as a narrative device in the story arc of films across multiple film genres, (action/adventure, comedy, romance, etc). Why do characters drink, where do they drink, and how does the result of their "getting drunk" advance the narrative? We'll also look at non-fiction films that tackle issues of addiction, as a way of comparing character development in Hollywood films to the results of this same behavior in everyday life. Film materials will include weekly screenings outside of class, and academic articles relating to portrayal and analysis of alcohol use in film and television, including the business of marketing alcohol in print and television advertising. From the psychological perspective we will discuss the topic and process of social influence and how the presence of others influences our behavior. Questions of interest will include the following: what are the mechanisms by which group influence unfolds? How and why might we be persuaded? Does the manner, and if so how, in which alcohol use is portrayed in movies and the media reflect the processes and principles of social influence? Readings will include chapters on social influence, persuasion and academic articles evaluating the manner in which alcohol is portrayed and advertised and the effect this has on alcohol consumption. In addition, issues of addiction will be discussed - from understanding the basis of addiction to examining the efficacy of addiction treatment.

  • Psychology
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1615
  • 10 of 30 enrolled
  • MTWR 04:30 PM-07:00 PM 06/17 - 07/11
  • OLF,ZIMB, WKIN

Dawn Gondoli

PSY 43363 | Body Image
Dawn Gondoli

In this seminar, we will explore the biological, psychosocial (including peers and family), and cultural factors influencing body image. We will explore impacts of "fitspo" and body esteem messages, and examine alternative means of reducing risk of body dissatisfaction (e.g., self and identity; self-compassion; gratitude). Potential connections between body image and disordered eating will be examined, including analysis of "classical" and contemporary theoretical models. Both basic and applied (i.e., intervention) research will be incorporated, and a lifespan approach will be utilized, examining body image during childhood, adolescence and midlife.

  • Psychology
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1610
  • 18 of 20 enrolled
  • TWR 07:00 PM-09:05 PM 06/17 - 07/26
  • OLF,ZIMB,

Jason Wilt

REG 30999 | Registrar test course
Jason Wilt

Course set for testing purposes and group registration capture.

  • Registrar's Office
  • 0.03.0 credits    CRN 2260
  • 0 of 3 enrolled
  • TBA 07/01 - 07/05
  • OLF,

Azeb Haileselassie

ROFR 10101 | Beginning French I
Azeb Haileselassie

For students who have had no previous exposure to French. An introductory, first-year language sequence with equal focus on the four skills: speaking, listening, reading and writing. An appreciation for French culture is also encouraged through readings and discussions. This course is to be followed by ROFR 10102.

  • French
  • 4.0 credits    CRN 1886
  • 5 of 15 enrolled
  • TWR 06:15 PM-08:15 PM 06/18 - 07/25
  • OLF,

Anne Schaefer

ROFR 20202 | Intermediate French II
Anne Schaefer

A fourth-semester college language course. Includes review and expansion of basic grammatical structures, extensive practice in speaking and writing, and readings and discussions of a variety of literary and nonliterary text of appropriate difficulty. Students must have a Language Exam Score between 351 and 400 to enroll in this class.

  • French
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2209
  • 3 of 15 enrolled
  • TWR 12:15 PM-02:15 PM 06/18 - 07/25
  • ALLN,LANG,MESE,OLF,SCLN,ZFTY,

Azeb Haileselassie

ROFR 60101 | Beginning French I
Azeb Haileselassie

For students who have had no previous exposure to French. An introductory, first-year language sequence with equal focus on the four skills: speaking, listening, reading and writing. An appreciation for French culture is also encouraged through readings and discussions. This course is to be followed by ROFR 10102.

  • French
  • 1.04.0 credits    CRN 1883
  • 6 of 10 enrolled
  • TWR 06:15 PM-08:15 PM 06/18 - 07/25
  • OLF,

Anne Schaefer

ROFR 60202 | Intermediate French II
Anne Schaefer

A fourth-semester college language course. Includes review and expansion of basic grammatical structures, extensive practice in speaking and writing, and readings and discussions of a variety of literary and nonliterary text of appropriate difficulty. Students must have a Language Exam Score between 351 and 400 to enroll in this class.

  • French
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2213
  • 1 of 10 enrolled
  • TWR 12:15 PM-02:15 PM 06/18 - 07/25
  • OLF,

Alison Rice

ROFR 63050 | French Graduate Reading
Alison Rice

A course designed to prepare students for the Graduate Reading Examination. No prerequisites. Open to undergraduate students by permission of the chair.

  • French
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1876
  • 17 of 18 enrolled
  • TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM 06/04 - 07/11
  • OLF,ZIMB,

Claire Reising

ROFR 63050 | French Graduate Reading
Claire Reising

A course designed to prepare students for the Graduate Reading Examination. No prerequisites. Open to undergraduate students by permission of the chair.

  • French
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2309
  • 14 of 15 enrolled
  • TR 11:00 AM-12:30 PM 06/04 - 07/11
  • OLF,ZIMB,

Alessia Blad-Miller

ROIT 10101 | Beginning Italian I
Alessia Blad-Miller

This is an introductory, first-year language sequence with equal focus on the four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. An appreciation for Italian culture is also encouraged through readings and class discussion. The sequence 10101-10102 is to be followed by ROIT 20201 or ROIT 20215.

  • Italian
  • 4.0 credits    CRN 1880
  • 14 of 17 enrolled
  • TBA 06/03 - 06/28
  • OLF,ZIMB,

Patrick Vivirito

ROIT 10102 | Beginning Italian II
Patrick Vivirito

This is an introductory, first-year language sequence with equal focus on the four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. An appreciation for Italian culture is also encouraged through readings and class discussion. The sequence 10101-10102 is to be followed by ROIT 20201 or ROIT 20215.

  • Italian
  • 4.0 credits    CRN 1881
  • 10 of 14 enrolled
  • TWR 12:00 PM-02:00 PM 07/01 - 07/26
  • OLF,ZIMB,

Patrick Vivirito

ROIT 60102 | Beginning Italian II - online
Patrick Vivirito

This is the second course in the introductory, first-year Italian language sequence with equal focus on the four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. An appreciation for Italian culture is also encouraged through readings and class discussion. This is a computer-enhanced course, taught fully online during the second four-week summer session. Class meetings will take place on Zoom three times a week and the course also involves independent work by students, a portion of which will be performed online on the textbook Sentieri Vista Higher Learning Supersite. The sequence 10101-10102 is to be followed by ROIT 20201.

  • Italian
  • 4.0 credits    CRN 2080
  • 0 of 2 enrolled
  • TWR 12:00 PM-02:00 PM 07/01 - 07/26
  • OLF,

Alessia Blad-Miller

ROIT 62101 | Beginning Italian I - online
Alessia Blad-Miller

This is the first course in the introductory, first-year Italian language sequence with equal focus on the four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. An appreciation for Italian culture is also encouraged through readings and class discussion. This is a computer-enhanced course, taught fully online during the first four-week summer session. Class meetings will take place on Zoom two times a week on Tuesdays and Thursdays and the course also involves independent work by students, a portion of which will be performed online on the textbook Sentieri Vista Higher Learning Supersite. The sequence 10101-10102 is to be followed by ROIT 20201.

  • Italian
  • 4.0 credits    CRN 2091
  • 2 of 3 enrolled
  • TBA 06/03 - 06/28
  • OLF,

Kathleen Boyle

ROIT 63050 | Italian Graduate Reading
Kathleen Boyle

This one semester, intensive study of Italian grammar and syntax is intended for graduate students working in the humanities or sciences, who are interested in acquiring reading proficiency in Italian.

  • Italian
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1882
  • 8 of 16 enrolled
  • TR 03:30 PM-05:00 PM 06/03 - 07/12
  • OLF,ZIMB,

Maria Coloma

ROSP 20201 | Intermediate Spanish I
Maria Coloma

This is an intermediate second-year language sequence with equal focus on oral and writing skills. It includes a review of basic grammar and then transitions into more difficult features of Spanish. Students learn to discuss and write about Hispanic cultural topics, current events, and literary texts. Student must have a Language Exam Score between 341 and 393 to register for this class.

  • Spanish
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1019
  • 14 of 16 enrolled
  • MTWR 10:00 AM-11:15 AM 06/03 - 07/14
  • LANG,MESE,NVCA,OLF,SCLN,ZCSC,ZFTY,

Leonardo Francalanci

ROSP 20202 | Intermediate Spanish II
Leonardo Francalanci

This is an intermediate second-year language sequence with equal focus on oral and writing skills. It includes a review of basic grammar and then transitions into more difficult features of Spanish. Students learn to discuss and write about Hispanic cultural topics, current events, and literary texts. Students must have a Language Exam Score between 394 and 439 to enroll in this class.

  • Spanish
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1020
  • 18 of 18 enrolled
  • TWR 10:30 AM-12:45 PM 06/03 - 07/12
  • ALLN,LANG,MESE,OLF,SCLN,ZCSC,ZFTY,

Maria Coloma

ROSP 60201 | Intermediate Spanish I
Maria Coloma

This is an intermediate second-year language sequence with equal focus on oral and writing skills. It includes a review of basic grammar and then transitions into more difficult features of Spanish. Students learn to discuss and write about Hispanic cultural topics, current events, and literary texts.

  • Spanish
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1941
  • 0 of 1 enrolled
  • MTWR 10:00 AM-11:15 AM 06/03 - 07/14
  • OLF,

Leonardo Francalanci

ROSP 60202 | Intermediate Spanish II
Leonardo Francalanci

This is an intermediate second-year language sequence with equal focus on oral and writing skills. It includes a review of basic grammar and then transitions into more difficult features of Spanish. Students learn to discuss and write about Hispanic cultural topics, current events, and literary texts.

  • Spanish
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1021
  • 0 of 0 enrolled
  • TWR 10:30 AM-12:45 PM 06/03 - 07/12
  • OLF,

Gabriel Reynolds

THEO 20706 | Quran, Bible, Christn Theo
Gabriel Reynolds

The goal of this course is to introduce students to the ways in which Christian theologians have interpreted the scripture of Islam, the Quran, through the centuries, and to explore with them possible Christian theological responses to that scripture. To that end the course will involve a clear presentation of the Quran and Quranic Studies, the relationship of the Qur'an to the Bible, and the tradition of Christian theological reflection on non-Christian religions. This course fulfills the second ("development") requirement. No background in the Qur'an, Arabic, or Islam, is required or expected of students.

  • Theology
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1618
  • 35 of 36 enrolled
  • MWR 06:00 PM-07:30 PM 06/17 - 07/26
  • OLF, WKDT

Anthony Pagliarini

THEO 60181 | Theology of Revelation
Anthony Pagliarini

God Speaks to us through the Word in Scripture and Tradition. This course intends (1) to provide a deeper knowledge of the Word as He conveys Himself through these two "Streams" of Revelation and (2) to give students the skills necessary to lead others (and themselves) in the ongoing task of theology -- of, that is, faith seeking understanding. In particular, we will study (1) the relation of natural knowledge and divine revelation; (2) the "streams" of revelation that are Scripture and Tradition; (3) the relation between these two and the means of interpreting them; and (4) the salient content of this revelation as it is communicated in the Old Testament, the New Testament, and the first several centuries of the Catholic Tradition.

  • Theology
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2186
  • 46 of 46 enrolled
  • W 08:30 PM-09:45 PM 05/22 - 07/19
  • OLF,

Ryan Borello-Wise

THEO 60890 | God & Atheism
Ryan Borello-Wise

This course offers a historical and systematic introduction to the philosophy of atheism, as well as major responses emerging from the Christian theological tradition. While our primary focus will be on the modern and postmodern periods, covering the so-called ?masters of suspicion? (e.g., Karl Marx, Friedrich Nietzsche, Sigmund Freud), as well as more contemporary figures associated with the ?death of God? and other attendant movements (e.g. Thomas J.J. Altizer, Slavoj Zizek, Judith Butler), we will also cover important ancient, medieval, and early modern figures in the attempt to understand the development of the atheist project through and across Western history. In discussing theological responses, the program of our course will be less to simply counterpose theist and atheist philosophy, than to examine how the conversation between the two has variously informed and clarified both. We will be simultaneously attentive to the many theoretical and terminological issues arising from these debates, focusing on contested understandings of God, Trinity, Church, the Last Judgment, and so on.

  • Theology
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2184
  • 16 of 24 enrolled
  • R 08:30 PM-09:45 PM 06/03 - 07/26
  • OLF,

Course Attribute Codes