Summer Courses 2021

Course Search

Below is a preliminary list of courses that will be offered in Summer 2021. Class meeting patterns are subject to change until registration opens on April 7th, 2021. If you have any questions regarding the Summer Online course offerings, please email summeronline@nd.edu.

For information on financial aid, please visit summersession.nd.edu/tuition-financial-aid.

Please note:

  • Graduate students can utilize their Summer Tuition Scholarships towards Summer Online courses.
  • Faculty and staff may use their educational benefits towards Summer Online courses for themselves and their dependents. More information can be found on the Ask HR site.

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Edward Hums

ACCT 24101 | Accountancy I
Edward Hums

An introduction to financial accounting and the accounting profession, with an emphasis on the decision-usefulness of accounting information. The course stresses the relation of accounting to economic activity, organizing information for decision-making, the resource acquisition decision, the uses of cash and noncash resources, the accounting for selling and manufacturing activities, and the information needs of multiple owners, lenders and equity holders. A prerequisite of all accountancy and finance courses. Course cannot be taken Pass/Fail.

  • Accountancy
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1373
  • 40 of 45 enrolled
  • MTW 07:30 PM-09:10 PM 05/31 - 07/09
  • BA02,OLF,ZODO,

Edward Hums

ACCT 24201 | Accountancy II
Edward Hums

A continuation of the introduction to accounting, with an emphasis on the use of accounting information and analysis for management decision and control. The purpose of the course is the learning of accounting techniques such as budget preparation, cost-volume-profit analysis, variable costing, contribution margins, relevant costing, performance evaluation of business units, transfer pricing and responsibility accounting for the planning, decision making and management control inside an organization. To complete a general knowledge of accounting and its usefulness in financial reporting and control the course also includes an introduction to auditing, attestation, corporate governance and the impact of Sarbanes Oxley Act on business organizations, plus an introduction to US taxation for individuals and corporations Course cannot be taken Pass/Fail.

  • Accountancy
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1374
  • 18 of 35 enrolled
  • MTW 05:00 PM-06:40 PM 05/31 - 07/09
  • BA02,OLF,ZODO,

Michael Meyer

ACCT 60000 | Financial Accounting
Michael Meyer

All business majors and decision-makers both within an enterprise and external to the enterprise need to have a basic understanding of accounting information. This course deals with the accounting process used to measure and report economic events. It assumes that students have covered the basic material in the MBA accounting workshop. It begins with an overview of how financial statements are constructed and later the emphasis shifts to interpreting and analyzing the financial statements. The course focuses on alternative ways of reporting economic activity and on the different uses that investors, managers, and regulatory agencies may have for financial statement data.

  • Accountancy
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 1603
  • 55 of 60 enrolled
  • MTWRF 09:00 AM-11:45 AM 06/14 - 06/25
  • ,

James O'Brien

ACCT 60111 | Federal Taxation
James O'Brien

The purpose of the course is to provide a broad introduction to taxation. The course is designed to prepare students for the Taxes and Business Strategy Course. Major topics to be covered in this first tax course include: types of taxes, tax rates, taxes and present values, tax planning, income from business operations, individuals (basics), investment planning, nontaxable transactions and tax considerations for property acquisitions.

  • Accountancy
  • 1.5 credits    CRN 1341
  • 4 of 15 enrolled
  • MTWRF 09:00 AM-12:00 PM 07/26 - 07/30
  • ACCT,OLF,

Keith Urtel

ACCT 60112 | Intermediate Accounting I
Keith Urtel

This course is the first of a two course sequence that cover intermediate level financial reporting topics. Topics covered across the two courses include: economic and institutional setting for financial reporting, accrual accounting and income determination, role of financial information in valuation, role of financial information in contracting, receivables, inventories, long-lived assets, financial instruments as liabilities, leases, pensions and post-retirement benefits, income tax reporting, and owners' equity.

  • Accountancy
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 1338
  • 9 of 15 enrolled
  • MWFS 04:00 PM-05:30 PM 06/21 - 07/03
  • OLF,

Keith Urtel

ACCT 60122 | Intermediate Accounting II
Keith Urtel

This course is the second of a two course sequence that cover intermediate level financial reporting topics. Topics covered across the two courses include: economic and institutional setting for financial reporting, accrual accounting and income determination, role of financial information in valuation, role of financial information in contracting, receivables, inventories, long-lived assets, financial instruments as liabilities, leases, pensions and post-retirement benefits, income tax reporting, and owners' equity.

  • Accountancy
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 1337
  • 9 of 15 enrolled
  • MWF 04:00 PM-05:30 PM 07/05 - 07/09 |MWS 04:00 PM-05:30 PM 07/12 - 07/17 |MWF 04:00 PM-05:30 PM 07/19 - 07/23 |MWS 04:00 PM-05:30 PM 07/26 - 07/31
  • ,

Kenneth Milani

ACCT 60232 | Strategic Cost Management
Kenneth Milani

This course builds on and reinforces concepts from the introductory accounting courses with applications in accounting and strategic cost management settings. The course is designed to help students become discriminating producers and users of strategic cost accounting information for decision-making. The course demonstrates how cost management analysts can add value to their organizations by providing recommendations to improve profitability of products, services, customers, and value streams. The course also focuses on measuring causes or drivers of costs, and making recommendations about capacity, quality, and time.

  • Accountancy
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 1339
  • 10 of 15 enrolled
  • MTRF 08:00 AM-10:45 AM 06/21 - 06/25 |S 08:00 AM-09:15 AM 06/26 - 06/26 |M 09:30 AM-10:45 AM 06/28 - 06/28 |WRF 08:00 AM-10:45 AM 06/30 - 07/02 |MTW 08:00 AM-10:45 AM 07/05 - 07/07 |R 08:00 AM-09:15 AM 07/08 - 07/08 |F 09:30 AM-10:45 AM 07/09 - 07/09
  • OLF,

James O'Brien

ACCT 60411 | Federal Taxation - Immersion
James O'Brien

The purpose of the course is to provide a broad introduction to taxation. The course is designed to prepare students for the Taxes and Business Strategy Course. Major topics to be covered in this first tax course include: types of taxes, tax rates, taxes and present values, tax planning, income from business operations, individuals (basics), investment planning, nontaxable transactions and tax considerations for property acquisitions.

  • Accountancy
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 1336
  • 11 of 15 enrolled
  • MTWRF 01:00 PM-05:00 PM 06/07 - 06/18
  • OLF,

Keith Urtel

ACCT 60512 | Audit & Assurance Service
Keith Urtel

This course provides a conceptual framework of the principles, standards, and procedures underlying financial audits. Topics covered include: generally accepted auditing standards, materiality and audit risk thresholds, issuance of the audit report, the audit process and documentation, internal control in a financial statement audit, analytical procedures, and auditor's legal liability, including the auditor's responsibility for fraud.

  • Accountancy
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 1340
  • 12 of 15 enrolled
  • MWF 02:30 PM-03:45 PM 07/12 - 07/16 |TWF 02:30 PM-03:45 PM 07/20 - 07/23 |MWF 02:30 PM-03:45 PM 07/26 - 07/30
  • ,

Zachary Miksis

ACMS 14145 | Stats for Business I
Zachary Miksis

A conceptual introduction to the science of data for students of business. Descriptive statistics: graphical methods, measures of central tendency, spread, and association. Basic probability theory and probability models for random variables. Introduction to statistical inference: confidence intervals and hypothesis tests. Many examples will be based on real, current business and economics datasets. Calculations will be illustrated in Microsoft Excel.

  • Applied & Comp Math and Stats
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1570
  • 23 of 28 enrolled
  • MTWR 12:30 PM-02:00 PM 06/14 - 07/23
  • BA01,OLF,ZOBJ,ZODO, MATH,WKQR

Alan Huebner

ACMS 24215 | R Programming
Alan Huebner

In this course, you will learn the foundational skills necessary in R that will enable you to acquire and manipulate data, complete exploratory data analysis (EDA), and create visualizations to communicate your findings. <p> Note: this course is delivered fully online. The course design combines required live weekly meetings online with self-scheduled lectures, problems, assignments, and interactive learning materials. To participate, students will need to have a computer with webcam, reliable internet connection, and a quiet place to participate in live sessions. <P> Students with other prerequisite courses or equivalent background preparation may enroll by permission of the instructor or permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies, Professor Alan Huebner (Alan.Huebner.10@nd.edu).

  • Applied & Comp Math and Stats
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 1413
  • 5 of 20 enrolled
  • T 07:00 PM-09:00 PM 05/31 - 07/15
  • OLF,ZODO,

John Dillon

ACMS 24216 | Python Programming
John Dillon

In this course, you will learn the foundational skills necessary in Python that will enable you to acquire and manipulate data, model data for the purposes of scientific analysis, and create visualizations to communicate your findings. The course will introduce you to efficient scientific computing using NumPy. You will learn how to apply the pandas library to perform a variety of data manipulation tasks, including selecting, subsetting, combining, grouping, and aggregating data. You will also learn how to generate and customize visualizations with matplotlib. The course will give you the basic ideas and intuition behind modern data analysis methods and their applications, with a strong focus on a course project and weekly assignments. <p> Note: this course is delivered fully online. The course design combines required live weekly meetings online with self-scheduled lectures, problems, assignments, and interactive learning materials. To participate, students will need to have a computer with webcam, reliable internet connection, and a quiet place to participate in live sessions. <P> Students with other prerequisite courses or equivalent background preparation may enroll by permission of the instructor or permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies, Professor Alan Huebner (Alan.Huebner.10@nd.edu).

  • Applied & Comp Math and Stats
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 1610
  • 4 of 17 enrolled
  • R 07:00 PM-09:00 PM 05/31 - 07/15
  • OLF,ZODO,

Alan Huebner

ACMS 34617 | SQL For Data Science
Alan Huebner

This course will teach students how to use Structured Query Language (SQL) to access and manipulate data stored in databases. Students will learn fundamental commands for filtering records, selecting variables, and merging data tables. These skills will be applied in the context of solving statistical problems in which students are presented with a research question, use SQL to obtain the appropriate data set, and then use the data to create an appropriate visualization and/or conduct a statistical inference to answer the question.

  • Applied & Comp Math and Stats
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1615
  • 1 of 30 enrolled
  • R 07:00 PM-08:50 PM 05/31 - 07/23
  • OLF,ZODO,ZTST,

Victoria Woodard

ACMS 54850 | Intermediate Probability
Victoria Woodard

This course introduces the theory of probability with emphasis on applications. Topics include discrete and continuous random variables, conditional probability and independent events, generating functions, laws of large numbers, the central limit theorem, Markov chains, Martingales, Brownian motion, and stochastic processes. This course is intended for Master students to be taken online and is not a qualified course for ACMS Ph D written exam. ACMS students in the PhD program should take ACMS 60850 instead. Note: This course is delivered fully online with a combination of synchronous live weekly meetings and asynchronous material. To participate, students will need to have a computer with webcam, reliable internet connection, and a quiet place to participate in live sessions.

  • Applied & Comp Math and Stats
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1597
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • M 07:30 PM-09:00 PM 05/31 - 07/16
  • OLF,ZODO,

Alan Huebner

ACMS 64051 | R Programming
Alan Huebner

In this course, you will learn the foundational skills necessary in R that will enable you to acquire and manipulate data, complete exploratory data analysis (EDA), and create visualizations to communicate your findings. <p> Note: this course is delivered fully online. The course design combines required live weekly meetings online with self-scheduled lectures, problems, assignments, and interactive learning materials. To participate, students will need to have a computer with webcam, reliable internet connection, and a quiet place to participate in live sessions. <P> Students with other prerequisite courses or equivalent background preparation may enroll by permission of the instructor or permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies, Professor Alan Huebner (Alan.Huebner.10@nd.edu).

  • Applied & Comp Math and Stats
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 1414
  • 12 of 15 enrolled
  • T 07:00 PM-09:00 PM 05/31 - 07/15
  • OLF,ZODO,

John Dillon

ACMS 64052 | Python Programming
John Dillon

In this course, you will learn the foundational skills necessary in Python that will enable you to acquire and manipulate data, model data for the purposes of scientific analysis, and create visualizations to communicate your findings. The course will introduce you to efficient scientific computing using NumPy. You will learn how to apply the pandas library to perform a variety of data manipulation tasks, including selecting, subsetting, combining, grouping, and aggregating data. You will also learn how to generate and customize visualizations with matplotlib. The course will give you the basic ideas and intuition behind modern data analysis methods and their applications, with a strong focus on a course project and weekly assignments.

  • Applied & Comp Math and Stats
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 1611
  • 16 of 18 enrolled
  • R 07:00 PM-09:00 PM 05/31 - 07/15
  • OLF,ZODO,

Alan Huebner

ACMS 64617 | SQL For Data Science
Alan Huebner

This course will teach students how to use Structured Query Language (SQL) to access and manipulate data stored in databases. Students will learn fundamental commands for filtering records, selecting variables, and merging data tables. These skills will be applied in the context of solving statistical problems in which students are presented with a research question, use SQL to obtain the appropriate data set, and then use the data to create an appropriate visualization and/or conduct a statistical inference to answer the question.

  • Applied & Comp Math and Stats
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1652
  • 6 of 10 enrolled
  • R 07:00 PM-08:50 PM 05/31 - 07/23
  • OLF,

Victoria Woodard

ACMS 64849 | Intermediate Probability
Victoria Woodard

This course introduces the theory of probability with emphasis on applications. Topics include discrete and continuous random variables, conditional probability and independent events, generating functions, laws of large numbers, the central limit theorem, Markov chains, Martingales, Brownian motion, and stochastic processes. This course is intended for Master students to be taken online and is not a qualified course for ACMS Ph D written exam. ACMS students in the PhD program should take ACMS 60850 instead. Note: This course is delivered fully online with a combination of synchronous live weekly meetings and asynchronous material. To participate, students will need to have a computer with webcam, reliable internet connection, and a quiet place to participate in live sessions.

  • Applied & Comp Math and Stats
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1598
  • 13 of 20 enrolled
  • M 07:30 PM-09:00 PM 05/31 - 07/16
  • OLF,ZODO,

Steven Buechler

ACMS 67672 | Special Studies
Steven Buechler

This course is for students who have completed all the requirements for the degree and are ready to graduate.

  • Applied & Comp Math and Stats
  • 0.06.0 credits    CRN 1978
  • 1 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Steven Buechler

ACMS 67695 | Directed Master's Project
Steven Buechler

Directed independent work on a project to be counted towards the master's degree in Applied and Computational Mathematics and Statistics.

  • Applied & Comp Math and Stats
  • 1.06.0 credits    CRN 1936
  • 1 of 1 enrolled
  • ,

Maureen Collins

ACMS 67890 | Independent Summer Research
Maureen Collins

This course is for graduate students receiving a summer stipend and conducting independent research. Registering for this course will ensure proper classification for tax purposes. Only those students both actively engaged in research and receiving a stipend are eligible for this course.

  • Applied & Comp Math and Stats
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1830
  • 36 of 430 enrolled
  • ,

Jonathan Hauenstein

ACMS 88900 | Research & Dissertation
Jonathan Hauenstein

Research and dissertation for resident graduate students.

  • Applied & Comp Math and Stats
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1825
  • 0 of 1 enrolled
  • ,

Zhiliang Xu

ACMS 88900 | Research & Dissertation
Zhiliang Xu

Research and dissertation for resident graduate students.

  • Applied & Comp Math and Stats
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1922
  • 2 of 9 enrolled
  • ,

Stefano Castruccio

ACMS 88900 | Research & Dissertation
Stefano Castruccio

Research and dissertation for resident graduate students.

  • Applied & Comp Math and Stats
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1962
  • 2 of 9 enrolled
  • ,

Lizhen Lin

ACMS 88900 | Research & Dissertation
Lizhen Lin

Research and dissertation for resident graduate students.

  • Applied & Comp Math and Stats
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 2022
  • 2 of 9 enrolled
  • ,

Bei Hu

ACMS 88900 | Research & Dissertation
Bei Hu

Research and dissertation for resident graduate students.

  • Applied & Comp Math and Stats
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 2032
  • 1 of 9 enrolled
  • ,

Daniele Schiavazzi

ACMS 88900 | Research & Dissertation
Daniele Schiavazzi

Research and dissertation for resident graduate students.

  • Applied & Comp Math and Stats
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 2033
  • 1 of 9 enrolled
  • ,

Yongtao Zhang

ACMS 88900 | Research & Dissertation
Yongtao Zhang

Research and dissertation for resident graduate students.

  • Applied & Comp Math and Stats
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 2034
  • 1 of 9 enrolled
  • ,

Zhiliang Xu

ACMS 98900 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch
Zhiliang Xu

Required of nonresident graduate students who are completing their dissertations in absentia and who wish to retain their degree status.

  • Applied & Comp Math and Stats
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1833
  • 1 of 9 enrolled
  • ,

Jun Li

ACMS 98900 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch
Jun Li

Required of nonresident graduate students who are completing their dissertations in absentia and who wish to retain their degree status.

  • Applied & Comp Math and Stats
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1957
  • 2 of 9 enrolled
  • ,

Daniele Schiavazzi

ACMS 98900 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch
Daniele Schiavazzi

Required of nonresident graduate students who are completing their dissertations in absentia and who wish to retain their degree status.

  • Applied & Comp Math and Stats
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 2023
  • 1 of 9 enrolled
  • ,

Chiara Sbordoni

AL 24107 | All Roads Lead to Rome
Chiara Sbordoni

Is it possible to understand the immense phenomenon of Rome in a semester of site visits, historical studies, literary readings, film viewings and lectures? Of course not. Nevertheless, students in this course will start to understand Rome by experiencing the complexity of its urban network; by studying the ruins of antiquity and the splendors of Renaissance, Baroque and 18th Century Rome; by tracing the epic adventure that reunited Italy and led to the establishment of Rome as its capital after twenty centuries (so that today, Rome is at the heart of two states: the Italian Republic and of Vatican); by revisiting the tragedies of modern times, including fascism and the civil war; and by learning about the Rome of postwar and contemporary Italy.

  • Arts and Letters (Non-dept.)
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1700
  • 7 of 9 enrolled
  • TR 10:00 AM-11:30 AM 05/31 - 07/23
  • IBCL,MESE,OLF,ZCSC,ZODO, FNAR,HIST,LIT,WKAR,WKHI,WKLI

Victor Lewis

AL 40701 | Phnx Inst:Tocqueville'sJourney
Victor Lewis

Alexis de Tocqueville?s Democracy in America (2 volumes, 1835, 1840) has been described as the greatest book ever written on democracy and the greatest book ever written on America. In it, Tocqueville perceives nearly all of the important issues related to modern liberal democracies and contextualizes them in his interpretation of the American experience. The book was written to convince Europeans that democracy was inevitable and to prepare them for it, so that the transition might be peaceful, moderate and just. Among the issues treated are the rule of law, the relationship between church and state, the activities of civil associations and local government, and the importance of culture and institutions in political life. This course will take Tocqueville?s book as its text in order to develop Tocquevillian themes related to politics and society today.

  • Arts and Letters (Non-dept.)
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1928
  • 21 of 27 enrolled
  • MTWRF 10:45 AM-12:30 PM 06/28 - 07/23
  • ,

Clinton Brand

AL 40702 | Phnx Inst:Medieval Cosmology
Clinton Brand

What do ancient myth-making and medieval cosmology have to do with modern science fiction and stories of space travel and alien civilizations? Well, quite a lot, if you are to appreciate the Space Trilogy of C. S. Lewis. Though not as well known or widely read as his popular Chronicles of Narnia, or the fantasy fiction of his friend J. R. R. Tolkien?s Lord of the Rings, Lewis?s Space Trilogy ranks as one of the most probing accomplishments of twentieth-century speculative and mythopoeic fiction with antecedents in the world-making imaginations of Dante and Milton. These three novels (Out of the Silent Planet, Perelandra, and That Hideous Strength) also offer an intriguing survey of the range and variety of Lewis?s intellectual vitality as a writer, story teller, literary critic, moral philosopher, and Christian apologist. In this class, we will explore Lewis?s Space Trilogy in relation to his study of the integrated worldview of the Middle Ages and Renaissance, as outlined in The Discarded Image: An Introduction to Medieval and Renaissance Literature, as well as in the context of his pioneering work of moral and educational philosophy, The Abolition of Man. Then we will voyage to Mars in the narrative of Out of the Silent Planet, before another space flight to Venus in Perelandra. Finally, we come back to Earth in That Hideous Strength for Lewis?s dystopian tale of a world beset by scientific materialism and resurgent gnosticism and a novel that offers a searching critique of social engineering and the quest for human perfectibility. Along the way, we will discuss a number of philosophical problems and theological mysteries, including the relationships between language and reality, metaphysics and ethics, fall and redemption, nature and grace, incarnation and atonement, flesh and spirit, sin and charity, morality and politics, science and imagination, among others. The Space Trilogy will take us from the ?outer space? of modern science fiction to the ?Deep Heaven? of classical and medieval cosmology and then to ?this pendent world,? the Earth, as the scene for a drama of academic intrigue and eschatological warfare.

  • Arts and Letters (Non-dept.)
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1929
  • 22 of 35 enrolled
  • MTWRF 02:15 PM-04:00 PM 06/28 - 07/23
  • ,

Collin Meissner

AL 45999 | Summer Internship
Collin Meissner

Credit toward graduation for up to two internships is available for College of Arts and Letters students upon approval by a dean in the Office for Undergraduate Studies. Students are required to provide a goals and objectives statement and to obtain a letter of offer for the internship in advance of beginning the internship, to keep a daily journal over the course of the internship, to have a letter of evaluation provided upon completion of duties, and to write a reflection paper.

  • Arts and Letters (Non-dept.)
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1516
  • 3 of 3 enrolled
  • ZINT,

Nicholas Russo

AL 45999 | Summer Internship
Nicholas Russo

Credit toward graduation for up to two internships is available for College of Arts and Letters students upon approval by a dean in the Office for Undergraduate Studies. Students are required to provide a goals and objectives statement and to obtain a letter of offer for the internship in advance of beginning the internship, to keep a daily journal over the course of the internship, to have a letter of evaluation provided upon completion of duties, and to write a reflection paper.

  • Arts and Letters (Non-dept.)
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1517
  • 2 of 3 enrolled
  • ZINT,

Joseph Stanfiel

AL 45999 | Summer Internship
Joseph Stanfiel

Credit toward graduation for up to two internships is available for College of Arts and Letters students upon approval by a dean in the Office for Undergraduate Studies. Students are required to provide a goals and objectives statement and to obtain a letter of offer for the internship in advance of beginning the internship, to keep a daily journal over the course of the internship, to have a letter of evaluation provided upon completion of duties, and to write a reflection paper.

  • Arts and Letters (Non-dept.)
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1518
  • 8 of 8 enrolled
  • ZINT,

Maureen Dawson

AL 45999 | Summer Internship
Maureen Dawson

Credit toward graduation for up to two internships is available for College of Arts and Letters students upon approval by a dean in the Office for Undergraduate Studies. Students are required to provide a goals and objectives statement and to obtain a letter of offer for the internship in advance of beginning the internship, to keep a daily journal over the course of the internship, to have a letter of evaluation provided upon completion of duties, and to write a reflection paper.

  • Arts and Letters (Non-dept.)
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1519
  • 0 of 3 enrolled
  • ZINT,

Darlene Hampton

AL 45999 | Summer Internship
Darlene Hampton

Credit toward graduation for up to two internships is available for College of Arts and Letters students upon approval by a dean in the Office for Undergraduate Studies. Students are required to provide a goals and objectives statement and to obtain a letter of offer for the internship in advance of beginning the internship, to keep a daily journal over the course of the internship, to have a letter of evaluation provided upon completion of duties, and to write a reflection paper.

  • Arts and Letters (Non-dept.)
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1520
  • 3 of 3 enrolled
  • ZINT,

Mary O'Callaghan

AL 45999 | Summer Internship
Mary O'Callaghan

Credit toward graduation for up to two internships is available for College of Arts and Letters students upon approval by a dean in the Office for Undergraduate Studies. Students are required to provide a goals and objectives statement and to obtain a letter of offer for the internship in advance of beginning the internship, to keep a daily journal over the course of the internship, to have a letter of evaluation provided upon completion of duties, and to write a reflection paper.

  • Arts and Letters (Non-dept.)
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1521
  • 1 of 3 enrolled
  • ZINT,

John Goodwine

AME 38491 | Undergraduate Research
John Goodwine

A research project for Aero or ME juniors at the undergraduate level under the supervision of a faculty member.

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 1.03.0 credits    CRN 2009
  • 0 of 1 enrolled
  • ,

John Goodwine, Michael Kitz, Todd Taylor

AME 40498 | Spc.Stud.Int'l Collab.Indus P
John Goodwine, Michael Kitz, Todd Taylor

In this course students will work in teams comprised of students from Notre Dame and universities in countries other than in the United States. The teams will complete projects provided by multinational companies working in industries related to aerospace or mechanical engineering. Periodic reporting requirements, design reviews and final project presentations consistent with industrial practice are required both to the academic supervisor as well as the industrial sponsor of the project.

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 1.06.0 credits    CRN 1051
  • 5 of 7 enrolled
  • MET,

John Goodwine

AME 47560 | Independent UG Design Project
John Goodwine

A design project at the undergraduate level under the supervision of a faculty member.

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 1.04.0 credits    CRN 1061
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

John Goodwine

AME 48491 | Undergraduate Research
John Goodwine

A research project at the undergraduate level under the supervision of a faculty member.

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 1.06.0 credits    CRN 1062
  • 2 of 15 enrolled
  • ZUG1,

John Goodwine

AME 67099 | Special Studies
John Goodwine

Individual or small group study under the direction of a faculty member in a graduate subject not currently covered by any University course. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1063
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Ryan McClarren

AME 67890 | Independent Summer Research
Ryan McClarren

This course is for graduate students receiving a summer stipend and conducting independent research. Registering for this course will ensure proper classification for tax purposes. Only those students both actively engaged in research and receiving a stipend are eligible for this course.

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1064
  • 76 of 150 enrolled
  • ,

Kenneth Christensen

AME 68691 | Thesis Research
Kenneth Christensen

This course is reserved for the six-credit-hour thesis requirement of the research master's degree. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1023
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Thomas Corke

AME 68691 | Thesis Research
Thomas Corke

This course is reserved for the six-credit-hour thesis requirement of the research master's degree. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1067
  • 1 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

David Go

AME 68691 | Thesis Research
David Go

This course is reserved for the six-credit-hour thesis requirement of the research master's degree. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1068
  • 2 of 8 enrolled
  • ,

John Goodwine

AME 68691 | Thesis Research
John Goodwine

This course is reserved for the six-credit-hour thesis requirement of the research master's degree. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1069
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Eric Jumper

AME 68691 | Thesis Research
Eric Jumper

This course is reserved for the six-credit-hour thesis requirement of the research master's degree. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1070
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Tengfei Luo

AME 68691 | Thesis Research
Tengfei Luo

This course is reserved for the six-credit-hour thesis requirement of the research master's degree. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1071
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Karel Matous

AME 68691 | Thesis Research
Karel Matous

This course is reserved for the six-credit-hour thesis requirement of the research master's degree. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1072
  • 1 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Scott Morris

AME 68691 | Thesis Research
Scott Morris

This course is reserved for the six-credit-hour thesis requirement of the research master's degree. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1073
  • 2 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Glen Niebur

AME 68691 | Thesis Research
Glen Niebur

This course is reserved for the six-credit-hour thesis requirement of the research master's degree. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1074
  • 1 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Timothy Ovaert

AME 68691 | Thesis Research
Timothy Ovaert

This course is reserved for the six-credit-hour thesis requirement of the research master's degree. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1075
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Joseph Powers

AME 68691 | Thesis Research
Joseph Powers

This course is reserved for the six-credit-hour thesis requirement of the research master's degree. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1076
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Ryan Roeder

AME 68691 | Thesis Research
Ryan Roeder

This course is reserved for the six-credit-hour thesis requirement of the research master's degree. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1077
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

James Schmiedeler

AME 68691 | Thesis Research
James Schmiedeler

This course is reserved for the six-credit-hour thesis requirement of the research master's degree. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1078
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Flint Thomas

AME 68691 | Thesis Research
Flint Thomas

This course is reserved for the six-credit-hour thesis requirement of the research master's degree. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1079
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Meng Wang

AME 68691 | Thesis Research
Meng Wang

This course is reserved for the six-credit-hour thesis requirement of the research master's degree. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1080
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Nicholas Zabaras

AME 68691 | Thesis Research
Nicholas Zabaras

This course is reserved for the six-credit-hour thesis requirement of the research master's degree. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1081
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Stanislav Gordeyev

AME 68691 | Thesis Research
Stanislav Gordeyev

This course is reserved for the six-credit-hour thesis requirement of the research master's degree. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1082
  • 2 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Thomas Juliano

AME 68691 | Thesis Research
Thomas Juliano

This course is reserved for the six-credit-hour thesis requirement of the research master's degree. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1083
  • 1 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Edward Kinzel

AME 68691 | Thesis Research
Edward Kinzel

This course is reserved for the six-credit-hour thesis requirement of the research master's degree. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1084
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Ryan McClarren

AME 68691 | Thesis Research
Ryan McClarren

This course is reserved for the six-credit-hour thesis requirement of the research master's degree. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1085
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Svetlana Neretina

AME 68691 | Thesis Research
Svetlana Neretina

This course is reserved for the six-credit-hour thesis requirement of the research master's degree. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1086
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Hirotaka Sakaue

AME 68691 | Thesis Research
Hirotaka Sakaue

This course is reserved for the six-credit-hour thesis requirement of the research master's degree. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1087
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Michael Stanisic

AME 68691 | Thesis Research
Michael Stanisic

This course is reserved for the six-credit-hour thesis requirement of the research master's degree. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1088
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Yanliang Zhang

AME 68691 | Thesis Research
Yanliang Zhang

This course is reserved for the six-credit-hour thesis requirement of the research master's degree. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1089
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Pinar Zorlutuna

AME 68691 | Thesis Research
Pinar Zorlutuna

This course is reserved for the six-credit-hour thesis requirement of the research master's degree. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1090
  • 1 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Donny Hanjaya Putra

AME 68691 | Thesis Research
Donny Hanjaya Putra

This course is reserved for the six-credit-hour thesis requirement of the research master's degree. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1091
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Maria Holland

AME 68691 | Thesis Research
Maria Holland

This course is reserved for the six-credit-hour thesis requirement of the research master's degree. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1092
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Jonathan MacArt

AME 68691 | Thesis Research
Jonathan MacArt

This course is reserved for the six-credit-hour thesis requirement of the research master's degree. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1093
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Mark Plecnik

AME 68691 | Thesis Research
Mark Plecnik

This course is reserved for the six-credit-hour thesis requirement of the research master's degree. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1094
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Jian-Xun Wang

AME 68691 | Thesis Research
Jian-Xun Wang

This course is reserved for the six-credit-hour thesis requirement of the research master's degree. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1095
  • 1 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Patrick Wensing

AME 68691 | Thesis Research
Patrick Wensing

This course is reserved for the six-credit-hour thesis requirement of the research master's degree. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1096
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Sangpil Yoon

AME 68691 | Thesis Research
Sangpil Yoon

This course is reserved for the six-credit-hour thesis requirement of the research master's degree. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1097
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Matthew Zahr

AME 68691 | Thesis Research
Matthew Zahr

This course is reserved for the six-credit-hour thesis requirement of the research master's degree. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1098
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Matthew Rosenberger

AME 68691 | Thesis Research
Matthew Rosenberger

This course is reserved for the six-credit-hour thesis requirement of the research master's degree. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1909
  • 1 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Kenneth Christensen

AME 68697 | Nonresident Thesis Research
Kenneth Christensen

For master's degree students. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1024
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Thomas Corke

AME 68697 | Nonresident Thesis Research
Thomas Corke

For master's degree students. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1099
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

David Go

AME 68697 | Nonresident Thesis Research
David Go

For master's degree students. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1100
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

John Goodwine

AME 68697 | Nonresident Thesis Research
John Goodwine

For master's degree students. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1101
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Eric Jumper

AME 68697 | Nonresident Thesis Research
Eric Jumper

For master's degree students. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1102
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Tengfei Luo

AME 68697 | Nonresident Thesis Research
Tengfei Luo

For master's degree students. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1103
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Karel Matous

AME 68697 | Nonresident Thesis Research
Karel Matous

For master's degree students. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1104
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Scott Morris

AME 68697 | Nonresident Thesis Research
Scott Morris

For master's degree students. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1105
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Glen Niebur

AME 68697 | Nonresident Thesis Research
Glen Niebur

For master's degree students. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1106
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Timothy Ovaert

AME 68697 | Nonresident Thesis Research
Timothy Ovaert

For master's degree students. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1107
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Joseph Powers

AME 68697 | Nonresident Thesis Research
Joseph Powers

For master's degree students. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1108
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Ryan Roeder

AME 68697 | Nonresident Thesis Research
Ryan Roeder

For master's degree students. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1109
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

James Schmiedeler

AME 68697 | Nonresident Thesis Research
James Schmiedeler

For master's degree students. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1110
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Flint Thomas

AME 68697 | Nonresident Thesis Research
Flint Thomas

For master's degree students. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1111
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Meng Wang

AME 68697 | Nonresident Thesis Research
Meng Wang

For master's degree students. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1112
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Nicholas Zabaras

AME 68697 | Nonresident Thesis Research
Nicholas Zabaras

For master's degree students. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1113
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Stanislav Gordeyev

AME 68697 | Nonresident Thesis Research
Stanislav Gordeyev

For master's degree students. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1114
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Thomas Juliano

AME 68697 | Nonresident Thesis Research
Thomas Juliano

For master's degree students. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1115
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Edward Kinzel

AME 68697 | Nonresident Thesis Research
Edward Kinzel

For master's degree students. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1116
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Ryan McClarren

AME 68697 | Nonresident Thesis Research
Ryan McClarren

For master's degree students. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1117
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Svetlana Neretina

AME 68697 | Nonresident Thesis Research
Svetlana Neretina

For master's degree students. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1118
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Hirotaka Sakaue

AME 68697 | Nonresident Thesis Research
Hirotaka Sakaue

For master's degree students. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1119
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Michael Stanisic

AME 68697 | Nonresident Thesis Research
Michael Stanisic

For master's degree students. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1120
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Yanliang Zhang

AME 68697 | Nonresident Thesis Research
Yanliang Zhang

For master's degree students. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1121
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Pinar Zorlutuna

AME 68697 | Nonresident Thesis Research
Pinar Zorlutuna

For master's degree students. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1122
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Donny Hanjaya Putra

AME 68697 | Nonresident Thesis Research
Donny Hanjaya Putra

For master's degree students. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1123
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Maria Holland

AME 68697 | Nonresident Thesis Research
Maria Holland

For master's degree students. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1124
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Jonathan MacArt

AME 68697 | Nonresident Thesis Research
Jonathan MacArt

For master's degree students. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1125
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Mark Plecnik

AME 68697 | Nonresident Thesis Research
Mark Plecnik

For master's degree students. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1126
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Jian-Xun Wang

AME 68697 | Nonresident Thesis Research
Jian-Xun Wang

For master's degree students. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1127
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Patrick Wensing

AME 68697 | Nonresident Thesis Research
Patrick Wensing

For master's degree students. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1128
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Sangpil Yoon

AME 68697 | Nonresident Thesis Research
Sangpil Yoon

For master's degree students. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1129
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Matthew Zahr

AME 68697 | Nonresident Thesis Research
Matthew Zahr

For master's degree students. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1130
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Matthew Rosenberger

AME 68697 | Nonresident Thesis Research
Matthew Rosenberger

For master's degree students. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1910
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Kenneth Christensen

AME 98991 | Dissertation Research
Kenneth Christensen

Required for candidates for the advanced degree in the research program. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1065
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Thomas Corke

AME 98991 | Dissertation Research
Thomas Corke

Required for candidates for the advanced degree in the research program. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1131
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

David Go

AME 98991 | Dissertation Research
David Go

Required for candidates for the advanced degree in the research program. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1132
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

John Goodwine

AME 98991 | Dissertation Research
John Goodwine

Required for candidates for the advanced degree in the research program. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1133
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Eric Jumper

AME 98991 | Dissertation Research
Eric Jumper

Required for candidates for the advanced degree in the research program. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1134
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Tengfei Luo

AME 98991 | Dissertation Research
Tengfei Luo

Required for candidates for the advanced degree in the research program. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1135
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Karel Matous

AME 98991 | Dissertation Research
Karel Matous

Required for candidates for the advanced degree in the research program. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1136
  • 1 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Scott Morris

AME 98991 | Dissertation Research
Scott Morris

Required for candidates for the advanced degree in the research program. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1137
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Glen Niebur

AME 98991 | Dissertation Research
Glen Niebur

Required for candidates for the advanced degree in the research program. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1138
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Timothy Ovaert

AME 98991 | Dissertation Research
Timothy Ovaert

Required for candidates for the advanced degree in the research program. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1139
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Joseph Powers

AME 98991 | Dissertation Research
Joseph Powers

Required for candidates for the advanced degree in the research program. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1140
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Ryan Roeder

AME 98991 | Dissertation Research
Ryan Roeder

Required for candidates for the advanced degree in the research program. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1141
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

James Schmiedeler

AME 98991 | Dissertation Research
James Schmiedeler

Required for candidates for the advanced degree in the research program. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1142
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Flint Thomas

AME 98991 | Dissertation Research
Flint Thomas

Required for candidates for the advanced degree in the research program. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1143
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Meng Wang

AME 98991 | Dissertation Research
Meng Wang

Required for candidates for the advanced degree in the research program. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1144
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Nicholas Zabaras

AME 98991 | Dissertation Research
Nicholas Zabaras

Required for candidates for the advanced degree in the research program. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1145
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Stanislav Gordeyev

AME 98991 | Dissertation Research
Stanislav Gordeyev

Required for candidates for the advanced degree in the research program. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1146
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Thomas Juliano

AME 98991 | Dissertation Research
Thomas Juliano

Required for candidates for the advanced degree in the research program. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1147
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Edward Kinzel

AME 98991 | Dissertation Research
Edward Kinzel

Required for candidates for the advanced degree in the research program. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1148
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Ryan McClarren

AME 98991 | Dissertation Research
Ryan McClarren

Required for candidates for the advanced degree in the research program. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1149
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Svetlana Neretina

AME 98991 | Dissertation Research
Svetlana Neretina

Required for candidates for the advanced degree in the research program. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1150
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Hirotaka Sakaue

AME 98991 | Dissertation Research
Hirotaka Sakaue

Required for candidates for the advanced degree in the research program. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1151
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Michael Stanisic

AME 98991 | Dissertation Research
Michael Stanisic

Required for candidates for the advanced degree in the research program. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1152
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Yanliang Zhang

AME 98991 | Dissertation Research
Yanliang Zhang

Required for candidates for the advanced degree in the research program. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1153
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Pinar Zorlutuna

AME 98991 | Dissertation Research
Pinar Zorlutuna

Required for candidates for the advanced degree in the research program. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1154
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Donny Hanjaya Putra

AME 98991 | Dissertation Research
Donny Hanjaya Putra

Required for candidates for the advanced degree in the research program. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1155
  • 3 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Maria Holland

AME 98991 | Dissertation Research
Maria Holland

Required for candidates for the advanced degree in the research program. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1156
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Jonathan MacArt

AME 98991 | Dissertation Research
Jonathan MacArt

Required for candidates for the advanced degree in the research program. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1157
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Mark Plecnik

AME 98991 | Dissertation Research
Mark Plecnik

Required for candidates for the advanced degree in the research program. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1158
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Jian-Xun Wang

AME 98991 | Dissertation Research
Jian-Xun Wang

Required for candidates for the advanced degree in the research program. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1159
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Patrick Wensing

AME 98991 | Dissertation Research
Patrick Wensing

Required for candidates for the advanced degree in the research program. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1160
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Sangpil Yoon

AME 98991 | Dissertation Research
Sangpil Yoon

Required for candidates for the advanced degree in the research program. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1161
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Matthew Zahr

AME 98991 | Dissertation Research
Matthew Zahr

Required for candidates for the advanced degree in the research program. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1162
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Matthew Rosenberger

AME 98991 | Dissertation Research
Matthew Rosenberger

Required for candidates for the advanced degree in the research program. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1911
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Kenneth Christensen

AME 98998 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch
Kenneth Christensen

This course is reserved to provide the required continuing minimal registration of one credit hour per academic semester for nonresident graduate students who wish to retain their degree status. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1066
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Thomas Corke

AME 98998 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch
Thomas Corke

This course is reserved to provide the required continuing minimal registration of one credit hour per academic semester for nonresident graduate students who wish to retain their degree status. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1165
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

David Go

AME 98998 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch
David Go

This course is reserved to provide the required continuing minimal registration of one credit hour per academic semester for nonresident graduate students who wish to retain their degree status. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1166
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

John Goodwine

AME 98998 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch
John Goodwine

This course is reserved to provide the required continuing minimal registration of one credit hour per academic semester for nonresident graduate students who wish to retain their degree status. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1167
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Eric Jumper

AME 98998 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch
Eric Jumper

This course is reserved to provide the required continuing minimal registration of one credit hour per academic semester for nonresident graduate students who wish to retain their degree status. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1168
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Tengfei Luo

AME 98998 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch
Tengfei Luo

This course is reserved to provide the required continuing minimal registration of one credit hour per academic semester for nonresident graduate students who wish to retain their degree status. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1169
  • 1 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Karel Matous

AME 98998 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch
Karel Matous

This course is reserved to provide the required continuing minimal registration of one credit hour per academic semester for nonresident graduate students who wish to retain their degree status. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1170
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Scott Morris

AME 98998 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch
Scott Morris

This course is reserved to provide the required continuing minimal registration of one credit hour per academic semester for nonresident graduate students who wish to retain their degree status. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1171
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Glen Niebur

AME 98998 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch
Glen Niebur

This course is reserved to provide the required continuing minimal registration of one credit hour per academic semester for nonresident graduate students who wish to retain their degree status. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1172
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Timothy Ovaert

AME 98998 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch
Timothy Ovaert

This course is reserved to provide the required continuing minimal registration of one credit hour per academic semester for nonresident graduate students who wish to retain their degree status. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1173
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Joseph Powers

AME 98998 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch
Joseph Powers

This course is reserved to provide the required continuing minimal registration of one credit hour per academic semester for nonresident graduate students who wish to retain their degree status. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1174
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Ryan Roeder

AME 98998 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch
Ryan Roeder

This course is reserved to provide the required continuing minimal registration of one credit hour per academic semester for nonresident graduate students who wish to retain their degree status. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1175
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

James Schmiedeler

AME 98998 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch
James Schmiedeler

This course is reserved to provide the required continuing minimal registration of one credit hour per academic semester for nonresident graduate students who wish to retain their degree status. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1176
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Flint Thomas

AME 98998 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch
Flint Thomas

This course is reserved to provide the required continuing minimal registration of one credit hour per academic semester for nonresident graduate students who wish to retain their degree status. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1177
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Meng Wang

AME 98998 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch
Meng Wang

This course is reserved to provide the required continuing minimal registration of one credit hour per academic semester for nonresident graduate students who wish to retain their degree status. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1178
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Nicholas Zabaras

AME 98998 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch
Nicholas Zabaras

This course is reserved to provide the required continuing minimal registration of one credit hour per academic semester for nonresident graduate students who wish to retain their degree status. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1179
  • 1 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Stanislav Gordeyev

AME 98998 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch
Stanislav Gordeyev

This course is reserved to provide the required continuing minimal registration of one credit hour per academic semester for nonresident graduate students who wish to retain their degree status. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1180
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Thomas Juliano

AME 98998 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch
Thomas Juliano

This course is reserved to provide the required continuing minimal registration of one credit hour per academic semester for nonresident graduate students who wish to retain their degree status. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1181
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Edward Kinzel

AME 98998 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch
Edward Kinzel

This course is reserved to provide the required continuing minimal registration of one credit hour per academic semester for nonresident graduate students who wish to retain their degree status. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1182
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Ryan McClarren

AME 98998 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch
Ryan McClarren

This course is reserved to provide the required continuing minimal registration of one credit hour per academic semester for nonresident graduate students who wish to retain their degree status. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1183
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Svetlana Neretina

AME 98998 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch
Svetlana Neretina

This course is reserved to provide the required continuing minimal registration of one credit hour per academic semester for nonresident graduate students who wish to retain their degree status. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1184
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Hirotaka Sakaue

AME 98998 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch
Hirotaka Sakaue

This course is reserved to provide the required continuing minimal registration of one credit hour per academic semester for nonresident graduate students who wish to retain their degree status. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1185
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

AME 98998 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch

This course is reserved to provide the required continuing minimal registration of one credit hour per academic semester for nonresident graduate students who wish to retain their degree status. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1186
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Yanliang Zhang

AME 98998 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch
Yanliang Zhang

This course is reserved to provide the required continuing minimal registration of one credit hour per academic semester for nonresident graduate students who wish to retain their degree status. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1187
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Pinar Zorlutuna

AME 98998 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch
Pinar Zorlutuna

This course is reserved to provide the required continuing minimal registration of one credit hour per academic semester for nonresident graduate students who wish to retain their degree status. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1188
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Donny Hanjaya Putra

AME 98998 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch
Donny Hanjaya Putra

This course is reserved to provide the required continuing minimal registration of one credit hour per academic semester for nonresident graduate students who wish to retain their degree status. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1189
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Maria Holland

AME 98998 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch
Maria Holland

This course is reserved to provide the required continuing minimal registration of one credit hour per academic semester for nonresident graduate students who wish to retain their degree status. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1190
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Jonathan MacArt

AME 98998 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch
Jonathan MacArt

This course is reserved to provide the required continuing minimal registration of one credit hour per academic semester for nonresident graduate students who wish to retain their degree status. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1191
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Mark Plecnik

AME 98998 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch
Mark Plecnik

This course is reserved to provide the required continuing minimal registration of one credit hour per academic semester for nonresident graduate students who wish to retain their degree status. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1192
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Jian-Xun Wang

AME 98998 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch
Jian-Xun Wang

This course is reserved to provide the required continuing minimal registration of one credit hour per academic semester for nonresident graduate students who wish to retain their degree status. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1193
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Patrick Wensing

AME 98998 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch
Patrick Wensing

This course is reserved to provide the required continuing minimal registration of one credit hour per academic semester for nonresident graduate students who wish to retain their degree status. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1194
  • 1 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Sangpil Yoon

AME 98998 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch
Sangpil Yoon

This course is reserved to provide the required continuing minimal registration of one credit hour per academic semester for nonresident graduate students who wish to retain their degree status. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1195
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Matthew Zahr

AME 98998 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch
Matthew Zahr

This course is reserved to provide the required continuing minimal registration of one credit hour per academic semester for nonresident graduate students who wish to retain their degree status. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1196
  • 1 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Matthew Rosenberger

AME 98998 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch
Matthew Rosenberger

This course is reserved to provide the required continuing minimal registration of one credit hour per academic semester for nonresident graduate students who wish to retain their degree status. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1912
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Vania Smith Allen

ANTH 10203 | Global Cultural Worlds
Vania Smith Allen

This class is designed to introduce anthropology as a lens to analyze the human condition and the diversity of human expression. We will also identify key topical themes and interests in cultural anthropology including an overview of its history and methods. Anthropology illuminates the myriad of cultural patterns and social systems throughout the world. Expressed through ethnography, anthropology reveals a vast variety of global cultural phenomena that reveal complex social patterns and the stunning vibrancy of ways we can live and view life. The course explores human action through multiple holistic lenses including culture concepts, kinship patterns, economic strategies, political practices, religious rituals, artistic performances, gender roles, ethnic identities, communicative languages, medical systems, patterns of violence, and the legacies of globalization.

  • Anthropology
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1266
  • 7 of 11 enrolled
  • TWR 10:30 AM-12:35 PM 06/14 - 07/23
  • ALSS,GLBC,ZFTY,ZFYS, SOSC,WKSS

Vania Smith Allen

ANTH 20203 | Global Cultural Worlds
Vania Smith Allen

This course introduces students to the field of social-cultural anthropology. Cultural anthropologists are primarily interested in exploring issues of human cultural diversity across cultures and through time. This course will explore key theoretical, topical, and ethical issues of interest to cultural anthropologists. We will examine diverse ways in which people around the globe have constructed social organizations (such as kinship, and political and economic systems) and cultural identities (such as gender, ethnicity, nationality, race, and class) and we will consider the impact of increasing globalization on such processes. Throughout the course we will consider how different anthropologists go about their work as they engage in research and as they represent others through the writing of ethnographies.

  • Anthropology
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1265
  • 1 of 9 enrolled
  • TWR 10:30 AM-12:35 PM 06/14 - 07/23
  • ALSS,GLBC,ZTST, SOSC,WKSS

Jeffrey Peterson

ANTH 24201 | Fundamentals of Bio Anth
Jeffrey Peterson

This course approaches human evolution from a theoretical point of view that combines both biological and cultural processes into a cohesive bio-cultural model. It begins by tracing the development of modern evolutionary theory and the place of evolutionary studies in anthropology, especially in the sub-field of bioanthropology. These concepts provide the framework for understanding the many lines of evidence that anthropologists use to explore and explain human evolution. These include studies of our primate relatives, through the intricacies of the fossil record, to archaeological evidence for the invention of material culture from the simplest stone tools to the complex cultural world that we live in today. Modern human variation can only be explained as the result of evolutionary forces acting on the complex interplay of biology and culture over millions of years. We continue to be affected by these forces, and this course not only provides information about where we came from, it also provides the scientific backgrounds to help us understand where we might be going as our species continues to evolve.

  • Anthropology
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1586
  • 9 of 15 enrolled
  • TWR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM 05/31 - 07/23
  • ALSS,NSBH,OLF,ZODO,ZTST,

ANTH 46100 | Dir Readings - Biological Anth

Intensive independent readings on a special problem area in biological anthropology about which the student will be expected to produce a detailed annotated bibliography and write a scholarly paper.

  • Anthropology
  • 1.03.0 credits    CRN 1232
  • 0 of 2 enrolled
  • ,

ANTH 46200 | Dir Readings - Medical Anth

Intensive independent readings on a special problem area in medical anthropology about which the student will be expected to produce a detailed annotated bibliography and write a scholarly paper.

  • Anthropology
  • 1.03.0 credits    CRN 1233
  • 0 of 2 enrolled
  • ,

ANTH 46300 | Dir Readings - Sociocultural

Intensive independent readings on a special problem area in sociocultural anthropology about which the student will be expected to produce a detailed annotated bibliography and write a scholarly paper.

  • Anthropology
  • 1.03.0 credits    CRN 1234
  • 0 of 2 enrolled
  • ,

ANTH 46400 | Dir Readings - Linguistic Anth

Intensive independent readings on a special problem area in linguistic anthropology about which the student will be expected to produce a detailed annotated bibliography and write a scholarly paper.

  • Anthropology
  • 1.03.0 credits    CRN 1235
  • 0 of 2 enrolled
  • ,

ANTH 46500 | Dir Readings - Archaeology

Intensive independent readings on a special problem area in archaeology about which the student will be expected to produce a detailed annotated bibliography and write a scholarly paper.

  • Anthropology
  • 1.03.0 credits    CRN 1236
  • 0 of 2 enrolled
  • ,

ANTH 46700 | Dir Readings in Anthropology

Intensive independent readings on a special problem area in anthropology about which the student will be expected to produce a detailed annotated bibliography, write a scholarly paper, or research report.

  • Anthropology
  • 1.03.0 credits    CRN 1237
  • 0 of 2 enrolled
  • ,

ANTH 48100 | Dir Research - Biological

Intensive independent research on a special problem area in biological anthropology, about which the student will be expected to produce a detailed annotated bibliography and write a scholarly paper.

  • Anthropology
  • 1.03.0 credits    CRN 1238
  • 0 of 2 enrolled
  • ZUG1,

ANTH 48110 | Dir Research - Bioarchaeology

Intensive independent research on a special problem area in biological anthropology and/or archaeology, about which the student will be expected to produce a detailed annotated bibliography and write a scholarly paper.

  • Anthropology
  • 1.03.0 credits    CRN 1239
  • 0 of 2 enrolled
  • ZUG1,

ANTH 48200 | Dir Research - Medical Anth

Intensive independent research on a special problem area in medical anthropology, about which the student will be expected to produce a detailed annotated bibliography and write a scholarly paper.

  • Anthropology
  • 1.03.0 credits    CRN 1240
  • 0 of 2 enrolled
  • ZUG1,

ANTH 48300 | Dir Research - Sociocultural

Intensive independent research on a special problem area in socio-cultural anthropology, about which the student will be expected to produce a detailed annotated bibliography and write a scholarly paper.

  • Anthropology
  • 1.03.0 credits    CRN 1241
  • 0 of 2 enrolled
  • ZUG1,

ANTH 48400 | Dir Research - Linguistic Anth

Intensive independent research on a special problem area in linguistic anthropology, about which the student will be expected to produce a detailed annotated bibliography and write a scholarly paper.

  • Anthropology
  • 1.03.0 credits    CRN 1242
  • 0 of 2 enrolled
  • ,

ANTH 48500 | Dir Research - Archaeology

Intensive independent research on a special problem area in archaeology, about which the student will be expected to produce a detailed annotated bibliography and write a scholarly paper.

  • Anthropology
  • 1.03.0 credits    CRN 1243
  • 0 of 2 enrolled
  • ZUG1,

ANTH 48700 | Dir Research in Anthropology

Intensive independent research on a special problem area in anthropology, about which the student will be expected to produce a detailed annotated bibliography, write a scholarly paper, or research report.

  • Anthropology
  • 1.03.0 credits    CRN 1244
  • 0 of 2 enrolled
  • ,

Catherine Bolten

ANTH 48711 | Independent Summer Research
Catherine Bolten

This course is for undergraduate students conducting zero-credit independent summer research.

  • Anthropology
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1954
  • 1 of 1 enrolled
  • ,

ANTH 66200 | Dir Readings - Medical Anth

Intensive independent readings on a special problem area in medical anthropology about which the student will be expected to produce a detailed annotated bibliography and write a scholarly paper.

  • Anthropology
  • 1.03.0 credits    CRN 1246
  • 0 of 2 enrolled
  • ,

ANTH 66300 | Dir Readings - Sociocultural

Intensive independent readings on a special problem area in sociocultural anthropology about which the student will be expected to produce a detailed annotated bibliography and write a scholarly paper.

  • Anthropology
  • 1.03.0 credits    CRN 1247
  • 0 of 2 enrolled
  • ,

Maureen Collins

ANTH 67111 | Independent Summer Research
Maureen Collins

This course is for graduate students receiving a summer stipend and conducting independent research. Registering for this course will ensure proper classification for tax purposes. Only those students both actively engaged in research and receiving a stipend are eligible for this course.

  • Anthropology
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1002
  • 21 of 25 enrolled
  • ,

Ettore Mazzola

ARCH 34224 | Rome Summer Intensive
Ettore Mazzola

Intensive Rome summer component of ARCH 30222.

  • Architecture
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 2027
  • 14 of 14 enrolled
  • ZORI,

Ettore Mazzola

ARCH 34224 | Rome Summer Intensive
Ettore Mazzola

Intensive Rome summer component of ARCH 30222.

  • Architecture
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 2028
  • 14 of 14 enrolled
  • ZORI,

Selena Anders

ARCH 34224 | Rome Summer Intensive
Selena Anders

Intensive Rome summer component of ARCH 30222.

  • Architecture
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 2029
  • 14 of 14 enrolled
  • ZORI,

Selena Anders

ARCH 34224 | Rome Summer Intensive
Selena Anders

Intensive Rome summer component of ARCH 30222.

  • Architecture
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 2030
  • 14 of 14 enrolled
  • ZORI,

David Mayernik

ARCH 34225 | Rome Summer Intensive
David Mayernik

Intensive Rome summer component of ARCH 31022.

  • Architecture
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 2043
  • 14 of 14 enrolled
  • ZORI,

David Mayernik

ARCH 34225 | Rome Summer Intensive
David Mayernik

Intensive Rome summer component of ARCH 31022.

  • Architecture
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 2044
  • 13 of 13 enrolled
  • ZORI,

Richard Piccolo, Pamela Graham

ARCH 34225 | Rome Summer Intensive
Richard Piccolo, Pamela Graham

Intensive Rome summer component of ARCH 31022.

  • Architecture
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 2045
  • 14 of 14 enrolled
  • ZORI,

Richard Piccolo, Pamela Graham

ARCH 34225 | Rome Summer Intensive
Richard Piccolo, Pamela Graham

Intensive Rome summer component of ARCH 31022.

  • Architecture
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 2046
  • 15 of 15 enrolled
  • ZORI,

Samantha Salden Teach

ARCH 45999 | Professional Internship
Samantha Salden Teach

Internship credit in the School of Architecture for full time summer employment (40 hours per week minimum) for a minimum of eight weeks. Students must have a firm job offer before being given permission to enroll. In addition to the successful completion of employment, students must submit weekly reflections to the instructor on a series of questions relating the employment experience to the academic program.

  • Architecture
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1395
  • 3 of 5 enrolled
  • ZINT,

Ettore Mazzola

ARCH 54211 | Independent Studies, Design
Ettore Mazzola

Independent studies on a design topic agreed upon by the student, instructor, and Assistant Deans.

  • Architecture
  • 3.06.0 credits    CRN 2052
  • 1 of 1 enrolled
  • OLF,ZODO,

Samantha Salden Teach

ARCH 61011 | Intro to Arch Representation
Samantha Salden Teach

Instruction in the techniques of traditional architectural drawing and presentation. Required of all incoming graduate students, except by special arrangement.

  • Architecture
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1394
  • 0 of 15 enrolled
  • MTWRF 09:00 AM-05:00 PM 06/14 - 07/23
  • ,

Jonathan Weatherill, Steven Semes

ARCH 74313 | Italian Arch and Urb Supp
Jonathan Weatherill, Steven Semes

A required supplementary course to the Italian Architectural and Urban Theory course, typically offered on site in Rome, Italy.

  • Architecture
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1698
  • 7 of 7 enrolled
  • ZORI,

Lois Oliver

ARHI 34417 | Art, Covid-19 & BLM
Lois Oliver

2020 has been an exceptional year. In March 2020 the UK was placed in lockdown to tackle the Covid-19 pandemic, the population was asked to stay at home, and museums and galleries had to close their doors. On 25 May the killing of George Floyd brought renewed attention to the Black Lives Matter movement. In the UK, protestors in Bristol toppled a nineteenth-century statue of seventeenth-century slave trader, Edward Colston, prompting calls for a wider review of the figures represented in public statues across the UK. Around the globe, fundamental questions about how we live, our social and economic structures, and how our past and present are visualised and commemorated, have been thrown into sharp focus. In this course students will explore how UK-based artists and art institutions have been navigating this extraordinary time. Art can open our eyes to the experiences of others, enabling us to see what they have seen or what they have conjured in their imagination; such fundamental human communication is vital at times of crisis. We will consider the economic impact of Covid-19 on the UK arts scene and the UK government measures introduced to mitigate those effects. We will investigate how artists and institutions have found new ways of engaging audiences during lockdown, amid an upsurge in demand for online content. We will explore how auction houses and commercial galleries have adapted their business model during the pandemic. We will also examine how museums are rethinking the interpretation of their collections to present more inclusive and diverse stories. The events of 2020 have emphasised our global interconnectedness: can art foster a new interconnected global perspective?

  • Art History
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1728
  • 9 of 15 enrolled
  • TR 04:00 PM-06:00 PM 05/31 - 07/23
  • OLF,ZODO, FNAR,WKAR,WRIT

Thomas Cornell

ARST 20602 | Wood Sculpture
Thomas Cornell

Open to all students. MATERIALS FEE. This course uses wood as a primary medium. Emphasis is placed on individual concept and design. Students learn the use of hand and power tools as well as techniques of joining, laminating, fabricating, and carving.

  • Art Studio
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1648
  • 10 of 15 enrolled
  • MTWR 10:30 AM-12:05 PM 06/14 - 07/23
  • 3DCO,ZUG3, FNAR,WKAR

Sara Fahling

ARST 24402 | Photography I
Sara Fahling

BA Core Option/BFA Core. MATERIALS FEE. This course is an introduction to the theory and practice of still photography. It is designed for all students interested in developing their photographic skills and also serves as the entry-level sequence for the photo major in studio art. The course is based on the use of digital cameras. Adobe Lightroom software and professional quality inkjet printing. Creative assignments introduce students to various thematic approaches including documentary work and portraits. Presentations cover both historical and contemporary approaches to the medium. A digital SLR camera with manual controls is highly recommended. Or, students may check out departmental cameras to complete assignments. A portable hard drive compatible with the Apple OS platform is required for storing personal files.

  • Art Studio
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1547
  • 13 of 15 enrolled
  • MWR 01:15 PM-03:15 PM 05/31 - 07/23
  • OLF,ZODO, FNAR,WKAR

Troy Aiken

ARST 30101 | Multilevel Ceramics
Troy Aiken

In this multi-level class, you will become involved with the creative process of art through the medium of clay. Beginning and advanced techniques will be explored as you learn to produce pottery and sculptural forms in a variety of methods including hand building and wheel throwing. A basic understanding of clay and glaze composition along with firing methods will also be addressed. The goal of this course is for you to become familiar with the elements of art and the principles of design, to use these consciously in an attempt to refine your aesthetic sensibilities, and further your understanding of art. The major benefit in taking our summer course lies in the intensive nature of its structure. Meeting four days in a row each week for seven weeks affords a momentum and focus not easily realized in regular semesters. Tools, clay & glazes are included in the lab fee.

  • Art Studio
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1495
  • 9 of 10 enrolled
  • TWR 03:30 PM-05:35 PM 06/14 - 07/23
  • 3DCO,ZUG3,

Troy Aiken

ARST 60101 | Multilevel Ceramics
Troy Aiken

In this multi-level class, you will become involved with the creative process of art through the medium of clay. Beginning and advanced techniques will be explored as you learn to produce pottery and sculptural forms in a variety of methods including hand building and wheel throwing. A basic understanding of clay and glaze composition along with firing methods will also be addressed. The goal of this course is for you to become familiar with the elements of art and the principles of design, to use these consciously in an attempt to refine your aesthetic sensibilities, and further your understanding of art. The major benefit in taking our summer course lies in the intensive nature of its structure. Meeting four days in a row each week for seven weeks affords a momentum and focus not easily realized in regular semesters. Tools, clay & glazes are included in the lab fee.

  • Art Studio
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1829
  • 2 of 2 enrolled
  • TWR 03:30 PM-05:35 PM 06/14 - 07/23
  • ,

Vania Smith Allen

ASIA 20203 | Global Cultural Worlds
Vania Smith Allen

This course introduces students to the field of social-cultural anthropology. Cultural anthropologists are primarily interested in exploring issues of human cultural diversity across cultures and through time. This course will explore key theoretical, topical, and ethical issues of interest to cultural anthropologists. We will examine diverse ways in which people around the globe have constructed social organizations (such as kinship, and political and economic systems) and cultural identities (such as gender, ethnicity, nationality, race, and class) and we will consider the impact of increasing globalization on such processes. Throughout the course we will consider how different anthropologists go about their work as they engage in research and as they represent others through the writing of ethnographies.

  • Asian Studies
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1267
  • 0 of 2 enrolled
  • TWR 10:30 AM-12:35 PM 06/14 - 07/23
  • ASSS, SOSC,WKSS

James O'Brien

BALW 24150 | Bus Law Contracts & Agency
James O'Brien

Students taking this course will gain an understanding of the American legal system and learn fundamental rules of law, particularly of torts, contracts, sales, and agency. Students will develop an appreciation of how law affects business decision-making, of competing policy concerns underlying the law, and of ethical dimensions of legal issues and business situations. Required for all BA students. Course cannot be taken Pass/Fail.

  • Bus Admin - Business Law
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1329
  • 28 of 45 enrolled
  • MTWR 10:00 AM-11:15 AM 05/31 - 07/23
  • BA02,OLF,ZODO,ZTST,

Gina Shropshire

BAUG 37000 | Internship Special Studies
Gina Shropshire

Students pursue an individual study during their summer internship which relates directly to their major area of study, designed with and supervised by a member of the faculty, leading to the production of oral and written reports reflecting deeper theoretical and empirical understanding. The proposed course of study is not part of a standard curriculum for students in the Mendoza College of Business and cannot duplicate or substitute for an existing or regularly offered course. Students interested in pursuing this study must seek out a Mendoza College of Business faculty member affiliated with the subject matter who will then develop a specific timetable for consultations and submission or presentation of student work and will evaluate the final agreed upon deliverable(s) to determine successful completion of the course and assignment of a grade.

  • Business Administration - UG
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1389
  • 56 of 100 enrolled
  • ZINT,

Gina Shropshire

BAUG 37000 | Internship Special Studies
Gina Shropshire

Students pursue an individual study during their summer internship which relates directly to their major area of study, designed with and supervised by a member of the faculty, leading to the production of oral and written reports reflecting deeper theoretical and empirical understanding. The proposed course of study is not part of a standard curriculum for students in the Mendoza College of Business and cannot duplicate or substitute for an existing or regularly offered course. Students interested in pursuing this study must seek out a Mendoza College of Business faculty member affiliated with the subject matter who will then develop a specific timetable for consultations and submission or presentation of student work and will evaluate the final agreed upon deliverable(s) to determine successful completion of the course and assignment of a grade.

  • Business Administration - UG
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 2037
  • 1 of 1 enrolled
  • ZINT,

Joseph O'Tousa

BIOS 14110 | Biology and Society
Joseph O'Tousa

Increased understanding of biological processes has fueled the development of new biotechnology. The course covers topics of current relevance, including the use of antibiotics, the development of genetically modified foods, genetic testing capabilities, stem cell technologies, cancer causes and treatments. Each topic is developed through reading assignments, instructor presentations, review of news media, and in class group interactions. A heightened awareness of the topic, and opposing viewpoints, will be developed through student debates and other in-class activities. Grading is based on class participation, online quizzes, assignments, and a final exam. <p> Note: this course is delivered fully online. The course design combines required live weekly meetings online with self-scheduled lectures, problems, assignments, and interactive learning materials. To participate, students will need to have a computer with webcam, reliable internet connection, and a quiet place to participate in live sessions.

  • Biological Sciences
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1280
  • 11 of 20 enrolled
  • TR 06:00 PM-07:30 PM 05/31 - 07/23
  • OLF,ZODO, NASC,WKST

David Hyde

BIOS 24251 | Classical/Molec Gntcs
David Hyde

This course deals with two major areas. The first area is classical genetics: Mendelian principles, chromosome mechanics, linkage and recombination, and chromosomal mutations. The second area is molecular genetics: DNA replication, RNA transcription, protein translation, recombinant DNA techniques, the nature of the gene and regulation of gene expression. However, these areas are not mutually exclusive and often the same concept is applied at different times in the course. The integration of topics at different points throughout the course will help to reinforce the material for the student and demonstrate how our understanding of genetics has been built over time. Pre-requisites: Students are required to have completed a year-long Introductory Biology sequence prior to taking this genetics course. <b>BIOS or BCHM majors may only take this course when they receive permission from their Director of Undergraduate Studies. All majors must speak with their DUS: for BIOS, David Veselik (dveselik@nd.edu) / for BCHM, Dee Anne Goodenogh-Lashua (dgoodeno@nd.edu). <p> Note: this course is delivered fully online. The course design combines required live weekly meetings online with self-scheduled lectures, problems, assignments, and interactive learning materials. To participate, students will need to have a computer with webcam, reliable internet connection, and a quiet place to participate in live sessions.

  • Biological Sciences
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1983
  • 7 of 20 enrolled
  • MR 07:00 PM-09:00 PM 05/24 - 07/23
  • CHSE,OLF,ZODO,

Jeffrey Peterson

BIOS 24401 | Fundamentals of Bio Anth
Jeffrey Peterson

This course approaches human evolution from a theoretical point of view that combines both biological and cultural processes into a cohesive bio-cultural model. It begins by tracing the development of modern evolutionary theory and the place of evolutionary studies in anthropology, especially in the sub-field of bioanthropology. These concepts provide the framework for understanding the many lines of evidence that anthropologists use to explore and explain human evolution. These include studies of our primate relatives, through the intricacies of the fossil record, to archaeological evidence for the invention of material culture from the simplest stone tools to the complex cultural world that we live in today. Modern human variation can only be explained as the result of evolutionary forces acting on the complex interplay of biology and culture over millions of years. We continue to be affected by these forces, and this course not only provides information about where we came from, it also provides the scientific backgrounds to help us understand where we might be going as our species continues to evolve.

  • Biological Sciences
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1599
  • 7 of 8 enrolled
  • TWR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM 05/31 - 07/23
  • ALSS,NSBH,OLF,ZODO,

Anjuli Datta

BIOS 34241 | Cell Biology
Anjuli Datta

Designed primarily for preprofessional students. Structural and functional aspects of the biology of cells are addressed.

  • Biological Sciences
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1614
  • 24 of 24 enrolled
  • TWR 05:00 PM-06:30 PM 05/31 - 07/23
  • OLF,ZODO,

Zachary Schafer

BIOS 34425 | Tumor Cell Biology
Zachary Schafer

This course is designed for undergraduate students interested in the biology of cancer. It will focus on understanding how normal cells become tumor cells and the specific molecular and cellular properties of tumor cells that are important for cancer progression. The course will also introduce the student to the field of cancer research through the critical examination of primary literature

  • Biological Sciences
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1823
  • 6 of 20 enrolled
  • MTR 10:30 AM-12:30 PM 05/31 - 07/23
  • OLF,ZODO,

Michael Cramer, Chelse Prather, Nathan Swenson, Stuart Jones

BIOS 35502 | Pract in Envmtl Field Bio East
Michael Cramer, Chelse Prather, Nathan Swenson, Stuart Jones

Course modules include vertebrate ecology, invertebrate ecology, aquatic ecology and forest ecology with each providing background information, field research exercises, and group research projects designed by the class. Five or more weeks are spent by each student designing and conducting their own field research project under direction of faculty or graduate students.

  • Biological Sciences
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1715
  • 26 of 27 enrolled
  • CHSE,

David Flagel

BIOS 35503 | Pract in Envmntl Field Bi West
David Flagel

This course is designed to give the student advanced practical laboratory experience in ecological studies in the grasslands and mountains of western Montana on the Flathead Indian Reservation. The ten week learning experience consists of one week modules on grassland/wildlife ecology, montane ecology, and human ecology focusing on ancestral Native American lifeways, and each student conducts an independent research project over the remaining weeks

  • Biological Sciences
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1716
  • 5 of 8 enrolled
  • ,

Elizabeth Archie

BIOS 48499 | Undergraduate Research
Elizabeth Archie

Research in collaboration with members of the faculty. Evaluation of performance will be accomplished through regular discussions with the faculty member in charge of the course. Enrollment must be completed before the end of the first week each semester. Students may not register for more than three credits per semester; only two credits per semester may be counted as BIOS elective credits by majors. Offered all semesters.

  • Biological Sciences
  • 0.010.0 credits    CRN 1967
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Jeanne Romero-Severson

BIOS 48499 | Undergraduate Research
Jeanne Romero-Severson

Research in collaboration with members of the faculty. Evaluation of performance will be accomplished through regular discussions with the faculty member in charge of the course. Enrollment must be completed before the end of the first week each semester. Students may not register for more than three credits per semester; only two credits per semester may be counted as BIOS elective credits by majors. Offered all semesters.

  • Biological Sciences
  • 0.010.0 credits    CRN 1968
  • 1 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Hope Hollocher

BIOS 48499 | Undergraduate Research
Hope Hollocher

Research in collaboration with members of the faculty. Evaluation of performance will be accomplished through regular discussions with the faculty member in charge of the course. Enrollment must be completed before the end of the first week each semester. Students may not register for more than three credits per semester; only two credits per semester may be counted as BIOS elective credits by majors. Offered all semesters.

  • Biological Sciences
  • 0.010.0 credits    CRN 2004
  • 1 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Kristin Lewis

BIOS 48499 | Undergraduate Research
Kristin Lewis

Research in collaboration with members of the faculty. Evaluation of performance will be accomplished through regular discussions with the faculty member in charge of the course. Enrollment must be completed before the end of the first week each semester. Students may not register for more than three credits per semester; only two credits per semester may be counted as BIOS elective credits by majors. Offered all semesters.

  • Biological Sciences
  • 0.010.0 credits    CRN 2036
  • 1 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Xin Lu

BIOS 48499 | Undergraduate Research
Xin Lu

Research in collaboration with members of the faculty. Evaluation of performance will be accomplished through regular discussions with the faculty member in charge of the course. Enrollment must be completed before the end of the first week each semester. Students may not register for more than three credits per semester; only two credits per semester may be counted as BIOS elective credits by majors. Offered all semesters.

  • Biological Sciences
  • 0.010.0 credits    CRN 2051
  • 2 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Mary McDowell

BIOS 48499 | Undergraduate Research
Mary McDowell

Research in collaboration with members of the faculty. Evaluation of performance will be accomplished through regular discussions with the faculty member in charge of the course. Enrollment must be completed before the end of the first week each semester. Students may not register for more than three credits per semester; only two credits per semester may be counted as BIOS elective credits by majors. Offered all semesters.

  • Biological Sciences
  • 0.010.0 credits    CRN 2053
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Maureen Collins

BIOS 67890 | Independent Summer Research
Maureen Collins

This course is for graduate students receiving a summer stipend and conducting independent research. Registering for this course will ensure proper classification for tax purposes. Only those students both actively engaged in research and receiving a stipend are eligible for this course.

  • Biological Sciences
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1841
  • 111 of 175 enrolled
  • ,

BPHY 67890 | Independent Summer Research

This course is for graduate students receiving a summer stipend and conducting independent research. Registering for this course will ensure proper classification for tax purposes. Only those students both actively engaged in research and receiving a stipend are eligible for this course.

  • Biophysics
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1842
  • 1 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

BPHY 96697 | Directed Readings

Readings and research not covered in the curriculum. which relate to the student's area of interest.

  • Biophysics
  • 1.09.0 credits    CRN 1843
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Troy Vogel

CBE 08999 | Research Experience HS
Troy Vogel

This is a zero-credit course for students engaged in independent research or working with a faculty member or a member of the University staff on a special project. Registration requires a brief description of the research or project to be pursued and the permission of the director of the Summer Session. No course work is required.

  • Chemical & Biomolecular Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1375
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Troy Vogel

CBE 28901 | Undergraduate Research
Troy Vogel

This is the course that freshmen and sophomore students should sign up for as their first experience in research. This is a one credit course, and involves a minimum commitment of 4-5 hours/wk. This course is S/U, may be taken more than once, but does not satisfy the Engineering/technical elective degree requirement.

  • Chemical & Biomolecular Engr.
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1376
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Victoria Goodrich, Troy Vogel

CBE 31358 | Chemical Engr Lab I
Victoria Goodrich, Troy Vogel

Chemical engineering laboratory courses are comprised of experiments that cover most of the major subject areas of chemical engineering. The rationale for combining all of the topics into two separate courses, as opposed to distributing them into the different lecture courses, is to provide a focused learning experience emphasizing experimental techniques to observe fundamental behavior, understanding of the phenomena in terms of the appropriate theory and experience at technical report writing. Formal and informal oral presentation skills are also an important part of the courses.

  • Chemical & Biomolecular Engr.
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1711
  • 8 of 15 enrolled
  • MWF 09:00 AM-12:30 PM 06/14 - 07/23
  • , WRIT

Troy Vogel

CBE 46497 | Directed Readings
Troy Vogel

Course requires the student to explore various readings chosen by the professor.

  • Chemical & Biomolecular Engr.
  • 1.03.0 credits    CRN 1982
  • 2 of 5 enrolled
  • ZUG2,

Troy Vogel

CBE 48901 | Undergraduate Research
Troy Vogel

This is the course that students should sign up for as their first experience in research. This is a one credit course, and involves a minimum commitment of 4-5 hours/wk. This course is S/U, may be taken more than once, but does not satisfy the Engineering/technical elective degree requirement.

  • Chemical & Biomolecular Engr.
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1377
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ZUG1,

Troy Vogel

CBE 48902 | Advanced UG Research
Troy Vogel

This is a three credit course on which students should expect to spend 12-15 hours per week. Successful completion of CBE 48901 or a summer (or academic year) research internship in the Department is a prerequisite for enrolling in CBE 48902. It can be counted as an Engineering/technical elective and students must produce a written report of their results at the end of the semester. This course is graded, and may be repeated.

  • Chemical & Biomolecular Engr.
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1378
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ZUG1,

Troy Vogel

CBE 48999 | Undergrad Research Experience
Troy Vogel

Registrar: This is a zero-credit course for students engaged in independent research or working with a faculty member of the University on a special project. No course work is required.

  • Chemical & Biomolecular Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1379
  • 10 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Maureen Collins

CBE 67890 | Independent Summer Research
Maureen Collins

This course is for graduate students receiving a summer stipend and conducting independent research. Registering for this course will ensure proper classification for tax purposes. Only those students both actively engaged in research and receiving a stipend are eligible for this course.

  • Chemical & Biomolecular Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1390
  • 104 of 430 enrolled
  • ,

Ruilan Guo

CBE 68901 | Research and Dissertation
Ruilan Guo

Research and dissertation for resident doctoral students.

  • Chemical & Biomolecular Engr.
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1704
  • 2 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

William Phillip

CBE 68990 | Non-resident Thesis Research
William Phillip

Required of nonresident graduate students who are completing their theses in absentia and who wish to retain their degree status.

  • Chemical & Biomolecular Engr.
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1977
  • 1 of 1 enrolled
  • ,

Tobias Flattery

CDT 24510 | Robot Ethics
Tobias Flattery

Robots or "autonomous systems" play an ever-increasing role in many areas, from weapons systems and driverless cars to health care and consumer services. As a result, it is ever more important to ask whether it makes any sense to speak of such systems' behaving ethically and how we can build into their programming what some call "ethics modules." After a brief technical introduction to the field, this course will approach these questions through contemporary philosophical literature on robot ethics and through popular media, including science fiction text and video. This is an online course with required, regular class sessions each week. Class meetings are online via Zoom webinar software (provided by the University). Note: this course is delivered fully online. The course design combines required live weekly meetings online with self-scheduled lectures, problems, assignments, and interactive learning materials. To participate, students will need to have a computer with webcam, reliable internet connection, and a quiet place to participate in live sessions.

  • Computing & Digtl Technologies
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1306
  • 5 of 5 enrolled
  • TR 06:00 PM-07:30 PM 05/31 - 07/23
  • CDCS,CDDF,OLF,ZODO, PHI2,WKSP

Alan Huebner

CDT 24641 | R Programming
Alan Huebner

In this course, you will learn the foundational skills necessary in R that will enable you to acquire and manipulate data, complete exploratory data analysis (EDA), and create visualizations to communicate your findings. <p> Note: this course is delivered fully online. The course design combines required live weekly meetings online with self-scheduled lectures, problems, assignments, and interactive learning materials. To participate, students will need to have a computer with webcam, reliable internet connection, and a quiet place to participate in live sessions. <P> Students with other prerequisite courses or equivalent background preparation may enroll by permission of the instructor or permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies, Professor Alan Huebner (Alan.Huebner.10@nd.edu).

  • Computing & Digtl Technologies
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 1415
  • 2 of 5 enrolled
  • T 07:00 PM-09:00 PM 05/31 - 07/15
  • CDDF,CDTD,OLF,ZODO,

John Dillon

CDT 24642 | Python Programming
John Dillon

In this course, you will learn the foundational skills necessary inPython that will enable you to acquire and manipulate data, model data for the purposes of scientific analysis, and create visualizations to communicate your findings. The course willintroduce you to efficient scientific computing using NumPy. You will learn how to apply the pandas library to perform a variety of data manipulation tasks, including selecting, subsetting, combining, grouping, and aggregating data. You will also learn how to generate and customize visualizations with matplotlib. The course will give you the basic ideas and intuition behind modern data analysis methods and their applications, with a strong focuson a course project and weekly assignments. <p> Note: this course is delivered fully online. The course design combines required live weekly meetings online with self-scheduled lectures, problems, assignments, and interactive learning materials. To participate, students will need to have a computer with webcam, reliable internet connection, and a quiet place to participate in live sessions. <P> Students with other prerequisite courses or equivalent background preparation may enroll by permission of the instructor or permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies, Professor Alan Huebner (Alan.Huebner.10@nd.edu).

  • Computing & Digtl Technologies
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 1612
  • 3 of 5 enrolled
  • R 07:00 PM-09:00 PM 05/31 - 07/15
  • CDDF,CDTD,OLF,ZODO,

Steven Krieg

CDT 44640 | Data Science
Steven Krieg

Data science can be viewed as the art and craft of extracting knowledge from large bodies of structured and unstructured data using methods from many disciplines, including (but not limited to) machine learning, databases, probability and statistics, information theory, and data visualization. This course will focus on the process of data science -- from data acquisition to analytics methods to deployment, and will walk the students through both the technical and use-case aspects in the process. It will place a larger emphasis on the machine learning component, with relevant inclusions and references from other disciplines. The course will give students an opportunity to implement and experiment with some of the concepts as part of a class project, in addition to the hands-on assignments using the Python programming language. Additionally, the course touches upon some of the advances in related topics such as big data and discuss the role of data mining in contemporary society. The course has been designed and developed by Nitesh Chawla, the Frank Freimann Professor of Computer Science and Engineering and Director of iCeNSA at the University of Notre Dame. <p> Note: this course is delivered fully online. The course design combines required live weekly meetings online with self-scheduled lectures, problems, assignments, and interactive learning materials. To participate, students will need to have a computer with webcam, reliable internet connection, and a quiet place to participate in live sessions. <p>Students enrolling in this course should have taken one or more courses or implemented one or more projects involving Python programming and one or more courses in probability or statistics. <p>Students enrolling in this course should have taken <b> <u> one or more</b> </u> courses or implemented <b> <u>one or more</b> </u> projects involving Python programming and <b> <u>one or more courses</b> </u> in probability or statistics.

  • Computing & Digtl Technologies
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1291
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • TR 07:00 PM-09:00 PM 05/31 - 07/23
  • CDDF,CDTD,OLF,ZODO,

Yahya Kurama

CE 47600 | Special Studies
Yahya Kurama

Individual or small group study under the direction of a faculty member in an undergraduate subject not concurrently covered by any University course.

  • Civil Engineering
  • 1.010.0 credits    CRN 1403
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Tracy Kijewski-Correa

CE 47600 | Special Studies
Tracy Kijewski-Correa

Individual or small group study under the direction of a faculty member in an undergraduate subject not concurrently covered by any University course.

  • Civil Engineering
  • 1.010.0 credits    CRN 1404
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Ahsan Kareem

CE 47600 | Special Studies
Ahsan Kareem

Individual or small group study under the direction of a faculty member in an undergraduate subject not concurrently covered by any University course.

  • Civil Engineering
  • 1.010.0 credits    CRN 1405
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Joannes Westerink

CE 47600 | Special Studies
Joannes Westerink

Individual or small group study under the direction of a faculty member in an undergraduate subject not concurrently covered by any University course.

  • Civil Engineering
  • 1.010.0 credits    CRN 1406
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Kapil Khandelwal

CE 48600 | Undergraduate Research
Kapil Khandelwal

A research project at the undergraduate level under the supervision of a faculty member.

  • Civil Engineering
  • 1.010.0 credits    CRN 1407
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ZUG1,

Andrew Kennedy

CE 48600 | Undergraduate Research
Andrew Kennedy

A research project at the undergraduate level under the supervision of a faculty member.

  • Civil Engineering
  • 1.010.0 credits    CRN 1418
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ZUG1,

Alexandros Taflanidis

CE 48600 | Undergraduate Research
Alexandros Taflanidis

A research project at the undergraduate level under the supervision of a faculty member.

  • Civil Engineering
  • 1.010.0 credits    CRN 1419
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ZUG1,

Diogo Bolster

CE 48600 | Undergraduate Research
Diogo Bolster

A research project at the undergraduate level under the supervision of a faculty member.

  • Civil Engineering
  • 1.010.0 credits    CRN 1420
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ZUG1,

Peter Burns

CE 48600 | Undergraduate Research
Peter Burns

A research project at the undergraduate level under the supervision of a faculty member.

  • Civil Engineering
  • 1.010.0 credits    CRN 1421
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ZUG1,

Harindra Fernando

CE 48600 | Undergraduate Research
Harindra Fernando

A research project at the undergraduate level under the supervision of a faculty member.

  • Civil Engineering
  • 1.010.0 credits    CRN 1422
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ZUG1,

Melissa Berke

CE 48600 | Undergraduate Research
Melissa Berke

A research project at the undergraduate level under the supervision of a faculty member.

  • Civil Engineering
  • 1.010.0 credits    CRN 1423
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ZUG1,

Jeremy Fein

CE 48600 | Undergraduate Research
Jeremy Fein

A research project at the undergraduate level under the supervision of a faculty member.

  • Civil Engineering
  • 1.010.0 credits    CRN 1424
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ZUG1,

Amy Hixon

CE 48600 | Undergraduate Research
Amy Hixon

A research project at the undergraduate level under the supervision of a faculty member.

  • Civil Engineering
  • 1.010.0 credits    CRN 1425
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ZUG1,

Clive Neal

CE 48600 | Undergraduate Research
Clive Neal

A research project at the undergraduate level under the supervision of a faculty member.

  • Civil Engineering
  • 1.010.0 credits    CRN 1426
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ZUG1,

Antonio Simonetti

CE 48600 | Undergraduate Research
Antonio Simonetti

A research project at the undergraduate level under the supervision of a faculty member.

  • Civil Engineering
  • 1.010.0 credits    CRN 1427
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ZUG1,

Ahsan Kareem

CE 48600 | Undergraduate Research
Ahsan Kareem

A research project at the undergraduate level under the supervision of a faculty member.

  • Civil Engineering
  • 1.010.0 credits    CRN 1428
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ZUG1,

Tracy Kijewski-Correa

CE 48600 | Undergraduate Research
Tracy Kijewski-Correa

A research project at the undergraduate level under the supervision of a faculty member.

  • Civil Engineering
  • 1.010.0 credits    CRN 1429
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ZUG1,

Yahya Kurama

CE 48600 | Undergraduate Research
Yahya Kurama

A research project at the undergraduate level under the supervision of a faculty member.

  • Civil Engineering
  • 1.010.0 credits    CRN 1430
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ZUG1,

Ashley Thrall

CE 48600 | Undergraduate Research
Ashley Thrall

A research project at the undergraduate level under the supervision of a faculty member.

  • Civil Engineering
  • 1.010.0 credits    CRN 1431
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ZUG1,

Kyle Doudrick

CE 48600 | Undergraduate Research
Kyle Doudrick

A research project at the undergraduate level under the supervision of a faculty member.

  • Civil Engineering
  • 1.010.0 credits    CRN 1432
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ZUG1,

Alan Hamlet

CE 48600 | Undergraduate Research
Alan Hamlet

A research project at the undergraduate level under the supervision of a faculty member.

  • Civil Engineering
  • 1.010.0 credits    CRN 1433
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ZUG1,

Robert Nerenberg

CE 48600 | Undergraduate Research
Robert Nerenberg

A research project at the undergraduate level under the supervision of a faculty member.

  • Civil Engineering
  • 1.010.0 credits    CRN 1434
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ZUG1,

David Richter

CE 48600 | Undergraduate Research
David Richter

A research project at the undergraduate level under the supervision of a faculty member.

  • Civil Engineering
  • 1.010.0 credits    CRN 1435
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ZUG1,

Joshua Shrout

CE 48600 | Undergraduate Research
Joshua Shrout

A research project at the undergraduate level under the supervision of a faculty member.

  • Civil Engineering
  • 1.010.0 credits    CRN 1436
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ZUG1,

Joannes Westerink

CE 48600 | Undergraduate Research
Joannes Westerink

A research project at the undergraduate level under the supervision of a faculty member.

  • Civil Engineering
  • 1.010.0 credits    CRN 1437
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ZUG1,

Ahsan Kareem

CE 67600 | Special Studies
Ahsan Kareem

Individual or small-group study under the direction of a faculty member in a graduate subject not concurrently covered by any University course.

  • Civil Engineering
  • 1.012.0 credits    CRN 1438
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Yahya Kurama

CE 67600 | Special Studies
Yahya Kurama

Individual or small-group study under the direction of a faculty member in a graduate subject not concurrently covered by any University course.

  • Civil Engineering
  • 1.012.0 credits    CRN 1439
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Joannes Westerink

CE 67600 | Special Studies
Joannes Westerink

Individual or small-group study under the direction of a faculty member in a graduate subject not concurrently covered by any University course.

  • Civil Engineering
  • 1.012.0 credits    CRN 1440
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Kevin Walsh

CE 67600 | Special Studies
Kevin Walsh

Individual or small-group study under the direction of a faculty member in a graduate subject not concurrently covered by any University course.

  • Civil Engineering
  • 1.012.0 credits    CRN 1441
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Maureen Collins

CE 67890 | Independent Summer Research
Maureen Collins

This course is for graduate students receiving a summer stipend and conducting independent research. Registering for this course will ensure proper classification for tax purposes. Only those students both actively engaged in research and receiving a stipend are eligible for this course.

  • Civil Engineering
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1442
  • 63 of 100 enrolled
  • ,

Joannes Westerink, Mollie Dash

CE 68600 | Thesis Direction
Joannes Westerink, Mollie Dash

Research to satisfy the six credit hours required for the research master's degree.

  • Civil Engineering
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1444
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Joannes Westerink

CE 68610 | Nonresident Thesis Research
Joannes Westerink

Required of nonresident graduate students who are completing their theses in absentia and who wish to retain their degree status.

  • Civil Engineering
  • 1.012.0 credits    CRN 1443
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Joannes Westerink, Mollie Dash

CE 78600 | Research and Dissertation
Joannes Westerink, Mollie Dash

Research and dissertation for resident doctoral students

  • Civil Engineering
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1445
  • 5 of 20 enrolled
  • ,

Joannes Westerink, Mollie Dash

CE 78610 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch
Joannes Westerink, Mollie Dash

Required of nonresident graduate students who are completing their dissertations in absentia and who wish to retain their degree status.

  • Civil Engineering
  • 1.012.0 credits    CRN 1446
  • 1 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Kevin Koh

CHEM 10172 | Organic Structure & Reactivity
Kevin Koh

This class, generally taught in the Spring, is the first semester of a two-semester organic chemistry sequence intended for students in biological sciences and pre-professional studies. It is accompanied by laboratory work and by a tutorial section. The course provides a solid foundation in organic structure and bonding, spectroscopy, and Lewis acid/base reactions. These concepts are then applied to understand substitution and elimination reactions with a focus on mechanism and factors governing selectivity. A section of this course, taught in the Fall semester, is intended for chemical engineering students.

  • Chemistry and Biochemistry
  • 4.0 credits    CRN 1736
  • 10 of 36 enrolled
  • MTWRF 10:20 AM-12:15 PM 05/25 - 06/25 |W 08:30 AM-10:00 AM 06/02 - 06/02 |R 08:30 AM-10:00 AM 06/10 - 06/10 |M 08:30 AM-10:00 AM 06/21 - 06/21 |F 08:30 AM-10:00 AM 06/25 - 06/25
  • ZTST, NASC,WKST

Kevin Koh

CHEM 11172 | Structure and Reactivity Lab
Kevin Koh

Experimental work to accompany CHEM 10172.

  • Chemistry and Biochemistry
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1737
  • 10 of 36 enrolled
  • MW 01:30 PM-05:00 PM 05/25 - 06/25
  • ,

Rachel Branco

CHEM 44405 | Neuropharmacology
Rachel Branco

This course will cover how exogenous drugs interact with the nervous system to produce immediate and long-term chemical, systems, and subjective effects. This will be an upper-level elective course for NSBH majors or other students who have an interest in Neuropharmacology.

  • Chemistry and Biochemistry
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1755
  • 10 of 20 enrolled
  • TWR 07:30 PM-09:00 PM 05/31 - 07/09
  • OLF,ZODO,

Kevin Koh

CHEM 50172 | Organic Structure & Reactivity
Kevin Koh

CHEM 50172 is a cross-list lecture that will accompany the existing CHEM 10172 (primary). The course description is the same for both CHEM 10172 and 50172; however, this cross-list offering does not include the co-requirement of the CHEM 11172 lab as 50172 is designed for students who have already taken CHEM 11172, or its equivalent.

  • Chemistry and Biochemistry
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1740
  • 7 of 10 enrolled
  • MTWRF 10:20 AM-12:15 PM 05/25 - 06/25 |W 08:30 AM-10:00 AM 06/02 - 06/02 |R 08:30 AM-10:00 AM 06/10 - 06/10 |M 08:30 AM-10:00 AM 06/21 - 06/21 |F 08:30 AM-10:00 AM 06/25 - 06/25
  • , NASC,WKST

Maureen Collins

CHEM 67890 | Independent Summer Research
Maureen Collins

This course is for graduate students receiving a summer stipend and conducting independent research. Registering for this course will ensure proper classification for tax purposes. Only those students both actively engaged in research and receiving a stipend are eligible for this course.

  • Chemistry and Biochemistry
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1735
  • 200 of 215 enrolled
  • ,

Gregory Hartland

CHEM 78599 | Thesis Direction
Gregory Hartland

Research and reading for master's students

  • Chemistry and Biochemistry
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1455
  • 1 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Gregory Hartland

CHEM 90697 | Directed Readings
Gregory Hartland

Reading and research on specialized topics that are immediately relevant to the student's interests and not routinely covered in the regular curriculum.

  • Chemistry and Biochemistry
  • 1.012.0 credits    CRN 1463
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • CHSE,

Gregory Hartland

CHEM 98698 | Research and Dissertation
Gregory Hartland

Research and dissertation for resident doctoral students.

  • Chemistry and Biochemistry
  • 0.015.0 credits    CRN 1456
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Gregory Hartland

CHEM 98699 | Visiting Student Research
Gregory Hartland

Research for visiting students.

  • Chemistry and Biochemistry
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1457
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Gregory Hartland

CHEM 98700 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch
Gregory Hartland

Required of nonresident graduate students who are completing their dissertations in absentia and who wish to retain their degree status.

  • Chemistry and Biochemistry
  • 0.09.0 credits    CRN 1458
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • CHSE,

Anthony Keen

CLAS 34210 | Roman Britain
Anthony Keen

This three credit class has been designed to allow students to investigate the impact of the Roman Empire on Britain from 55BC to 406AD, and how this influence is still prevalent today. Through the discussion of both archaeological and textual sources, an understanding of what life was like in Roman occupied Britannia will be obtained. We will engage with a number of related topics, which include the changes in daily life for Britons under Roman rule, the creation of new towns, the development of technology and the role of religion. A key part of this course will be a number of site visits to put into context what can be gleaned from the textual and visual source material taught in class. These experiences will also showcase how contemporary Britain engages with its past, and the variety of methods that are employed to aid the preservation of this period of history

  • Classics in Translation
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1847
  • 2 of 10 enrolled
  • TR 05:00 PM-07:00 PM 05/31 - 07/23
  • MESE,OLF,ZODO,ZOLA,ZOLS, HIST,WKHI

Maureen Collins

CLAS 67890 | Independent Summer Research
Maureen Collins

This course is for graduate students receiving a summer stipend and conducting independent research. Registering for this course will ensure proper classification for tax purposes. Only those students both actively engaged in research and receiving a stipend are eligible for this course.

  • Classics in Translation
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1005
  • 1 of 500 enrolled
  • ,

David Hernandez

CLAS 78598 | Summer Thesis Direction
David Hernandez

For students doing thesis work for a research master's degree.

  • Classics in Translation
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1006
  • 0 of 2 enrolled
  • ,

Juanita Cilliers

CLGR 10001 | Beginning Greek I
Juanita Cilliers

This two-semester sequence of courses introduces students to the language of the ancient Greeks for the first time. It emphasizes the fundamentals of ancient Greek grammar and vocabulary, and prepares students to read original Greek texts. An appreciation for ancient Greek culture is also fostered through secondary readings and class discussion.

  • Greek Language and Literature
  • 4.0 credits    CRN 1003
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • MTWRF 09:00 AM-12:00 PM 06/02 - 06/25
  • ZTST,

Ashley Walker

CLGR 10002 | Beginning Greek II
Ashley Walker

This two-semester sequence of courses introduces students to the language of the ancient Greeks for the first time. It emphasizes the fundamentals of ancient Greek grammar and vocabulary, and prepares students to read original Greek texts. An appreciation for ancient Greek culture is also fostered through secondary readings and class discussion.

  • Greek Language and Literature
  • 4.0 credits    CRN 1004
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • MTWRF 09:00 AM-11:30 AM 06/28 - 07/23
  • ZTST,

James White

CLGR 20103 | Intermediate Greek
James White

This second-year language course is designed for students who have taken one year of Beginning Greek or its equivalent. The course combines a review of grammar with careful reading of classical Greek authors including Lysias, Plato, and Homer. In addition to improving students' translating skills, this course introduces methods for studying Greek literature in its historical and cultural contexts, and it prepares students for more advanced work with a variety of ancient Greek literary genres. At the course's end students will be functioning independent readers of Greek.

  • Greek Language and Literature
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1007
  • 1 of 5 enrolled
  • MTWR 10:30 AM-01:00 PM 06/28 - 07/23
  • LANG,MESE,SCLN,ZTST,

Juanita Cilliers

CLGR 60001 | Beginning Greek I
Juanita Cilliers

This two-semester sequence of courses introduces graduate students to the language of the ancient Greeks for the first time. It emphasizes the fundamentals of ancient Greek grammar and vocabulary, and prepares students to read original Greek texts. An appreciation for ancient Greek culture is also fostered through secondary readings and class discussion. CLGR 60001 is offered each fall semester and CLGR 60002 is offered each spring semester. (Both courses are offered in the Summer term.)

  • Greek Language and Literature
  • 4.0 credits    CRN 1008
  • 2 of 5 enrolled
  • MTWRF 09:00 AM-12:00 PM 06/02 - 06/25
  • ,

Juanita Cilliers

CLGR 60001 | Beginning Greek I
Juanita Cilliers

This two-semester sequence of courses introduces graduate students to the language of the ancient Greeks for the first time. It emphasizes the fundamentals of ancient Greek grammar and vocabulary, and prepares students to read original Greek texts. An appreciation for ancient Greek culture is also fostered through secondary readings and class discussion. CLGR 60001 is offered each fall semester and CLGR 60002 is offered each spring semester. (Both courses are offered in the Summer term.)

  • Greek Language and Literature
  • 4.0 credits    CRN 1013
  • 1 of 9 enrolled
  • MTWRF 09:00 AM-12:00 PM 06/02 - 06/25
  • ZTST,

Ashley Walker

CLGR 60002 | Beginning Greek II
Ashley Walker

This two-semester sequence of courses introduces graduate students to the language of the ancient Greeks for the first time. It emphasizes the fundamentals of ancient Greek grammar and vocabulary, and prepares students to read original Greek texts. An appreciation for ancient Greek culture is also fostered through secondary readings and class discussion.

  • Greek Language and Literature
  • 4.0 credits    CRN 1009
  • 2 of 9 enrolled
  • MTWRF 09:00 AM-11:30 AM 06/28 - 07/23
  • ZTST,

Ashley Walker

CLGR 60002 | Beginning Greek II
Ashley Walker

This two-semester sequence of courses introduces graduate students to the language of the ancient Greeks for the first time. It emphasizes the fundamentals of ancient Greek grammar and vocabulary, and prepares students to read original Greek texts. An appreciation for ancient Greek culture is also fostered through secondary readings and class discussion.

  • Greek Language and Literature
  • 4.0 credits    CRN 1012
  • 2 of 5 enrolled
  • MTWRF 09:00 AM-11:30 AM 06/28 - 07/23
  • ZTST,

James White

CLGR 60103 | Intermediate Greek
James White

This second-year language course is designed for students who have taken one year of Beginning Greek or its equivalent. The course combines a review of grammar with careful reading of classical Greek authors including Lysias, Plato, and Homer. In addition to improving students' translating skills, this course introduces methods for studying Greek literature in its historical and cultural contexts, and it prepares students for more advanced work with a variety of ancient Greek literary genres. At the course's end students will be functioning independent readers of Greek.

  • Greek Language and Literature
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1010
  • 2 of 5 enrolled
  • MTWR 10:30 AM-01:00 PM 06/28 - 07/23
  • ZTST,

James White

CLGR 60103 | Intermediate Greek
James White

This second-year language course is designed for students who have taken one year of Beginning Greek or its equivalent. The course combines a review of grammar with careful reading of classical Greek authors including Lysias, Plato, and Homer. In addition to improving students' translating skills, this course introduces methods for studying Greek literature in its historical and cultural contexts, and it prepares students for more advanced work with a variety of ancient Greek literary genres. At the course's end students will be functioning independent readers of Greek.

  • Greek Language and Literature
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1011
  • 3 of 9 enrolled
  • MTWR 10:30 AM-01:00 PM 06/28 - 07/23
  • ZTST,

Benjamin Wiley

CLLA 10001 | Beginning Latin I
Benjamin Wiley

This Latin course initiates a two-semester sequence that introduces students to the language and culture of the ancient Romans. It emphasizes the fundamentals of Latin grammar and vocabulary, and prepares students to read original Latin texts. During the academic year, this course is taught as a hybrid course; a significant portion of the learning will be done by students working independently online. A deeper appreciation for English grammar and ancient Roman culture will be fostered through class discussion and attentive reading. This course is offered every semester.

  • Latin Language and Literature
  • 4.0 credits    CRN 1014
  • 1 of 3 enrolled
  • MTWRF 09:00 AM-12:00 PM 06/02 - 06/25
  • LALL,ZTST,

Lucy Grinnan

CLLA 10002 | Beginning Latin II
Lucy Grinnan

This two-semester sequence of courses introduces students to the language of the ancient Romans for the first time. It emphasizes the fundamentals of Latin grammar and vocabulary, and prepares students to read original Latin texts. An appreciation for ancient Roman culture is also fostered through secondary readings and class discussion.

  • Latin Language and Literature
  • 4.0 credits    CRN 1015
  • 1 of 3 enrolled
  • MTWRF 09:30 AM-12:00 PM 06/28 - 07/23
  • ZTST,

Hildegund Muller

CLLA 34340 | Augustine: Life & Sermons
Hildegund Muller

Augustine of Hippo (354-430 CE) is generally recognized to be the greatest of the Latin Church Fathers and one of the foremost thinkers of the Western Church. Have you ever wanted to encounter his ideas in the Latin original, but have shied away from the complexity and sheer volume of his major works? Then this course is for you! We will approach Augustine's teachings the same way his congregation did: through reading his sermons in Latin and listening as he explains his thoughts on grace, the sacraments and priesthood, the Bible, and the history of salvation in the clear and accessible words of a preacher. The readings are suitable for students who have taken an Intermediate Latin course or anyone at an intermediate or advanced level, both first-time learners and students who want to refresh their Latin or take their first steps in Christian Latin. The course provides an introduction to Augustine's major ideas, as well as his life and the events of his bishopric, including his fight against pagan beliefs and those Christian groups he considered heretical. We will encounter Augustine as a thinker, a reader of the Bible, a shepherd of souls, and a mystic. In addition to the texts themselves, we will consider the historical, liturgical, and philosophical background and discuss the material context in which his sermons were delivered: the buildings and their furniture, the listeners and the cities they inhabited, the preacher, his rhetoric, and his body language.

  • Latin Language and Literature
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1663
  • 2 of 7 enrolled
  • MWR 04:00 PM-06:00 PM 06/14 - 07/23
  • ALLN,LANG,OLF,SCLN,ZODO,

Benjamin Wiley

CLLA 60001 | Beginning Latin I
Benjamin Wiley

This Latin course initiates a two-semester sequence that introduces students to the language and culture of the ancient Romans. It emphasizes the fundamentals of Latin grammar and vocabulary, and prepares students to read original Latin texts. During the academic year, this course is taught as a hybrid course; a significant portion of the learning will be done by students working independently online. A deeper appreciation for English grammar and ancient Roman culture will be fostered through class discussion and attentive reading. This course is offered every semester.

  • Latin Language and Literature
  • 4.0 credits    CRN 1017
  • 5 of 7 enrolled
  • MTWRF 09:00 AM-12:00 PM 06/02 - 06/25
  • LALL,ZTST,

Benjamin Wiley

CLLA 60001 | Beginning Latin I
Benjamin Wiley

This Latin course initiates a two-semester sequence that introduces students to the language and culture of the ancient Romans. It emphasizes the fundamentals of Latin grammar and vocabulary, and prepares students to read original Latin texts. During the academic year, this course is taught as a hybrid course; a significant portion of the learning will be done by students working independently online. A deeper appreciation for English grammar and ancient Roman culture will be fostered through class discussion and attentive reading. This course is offered every semester.

  • Latin Language and Literature
  • 4.0 credits    CRN 1018
  • 2 of 9 enrolled
  • MTWRF 09:00 AM-12:00 PM 06/02 - 06/25
  • LALL,ZTST,

Lucy Grinnan

CLLA 60002 | Beginning Latin II
Lucy Grinnan

This two-semester sequence of courses introduces students to the language of the ancient Romans for the first time. It emphasizes the fundamentals of Latin grammar and vocabulary, and prepares students to read original Latin texts. An appreciation for ancient Roman culture is also fostered through secondary readings and class discussion.

  • Latin Language and Literature
  • 4.0 credits    CRN 1019
  • 3 of 7 enrolled
  • MTWRF 09:30 AM-12:00 PM 06/28 - 07/23
  • ZTST,

Lucy Grinnan

CLLA 60002 | Beginning Latin II
Lucy Grinnan

This two-semester sequence of courses introduces students to the language of the ancient Romans for the first time. It emphasizes the fundamentals of Latin grammar and vocabulary, and prepares students to read original Latin texts. An appreciation for ancient Roman culture is also fostered through secondary readings and class discussion.

  • Latin Language and Literature
  • 4.0 credits    CRN 1020
  • 4 of 9 enrolled
  • MTWRF 09:30 AM-12:00 PM 06/28 - 07/23
  • ZTST,

Hildegund Muller

CLLA 64340 | Augustine: Life & Sermons
Hildegund Muller

Augustine of Hippo (354-430 CE) is generally recognized to be the greatest of the Latin Church Fathers and one of the foremost thinkers of the Western Church. Have you ever wanted to encounter his ideas in the Latin original, but have shied away from the complexity and sheer volume of his major works? Then this course is for you! We will approach Augustine's teachings the same way his congregation did: through reading his sermons in Latin and listening as he explains his thoughts on grace, the sacraments and priesthood, the Bible and the history of salvation in the clear and accessible words of a preacher. The readings are suitable for students who have taken an Intermediate Latin course or anyone at an intermediate or advanced level, both first-time learners and students who want to refresh their Latin or take their first steps in Christian Latin. The course provides an introduction to Augustine's major ideas, as well as his life and the events of his bishopric, including his fight against pagan beliefs and those Christian groups he considered heretical. We will encounter Augustine as a thinker, a reader of the Bible, a shepherd of souls, and a mystic. In addition to the texts themselves, we will consider the historical, liturgical and philosophical background and discuss the material context in which his sermons were delivered: the buildings and their furniture, the listeners and the cities they inhabited, the preacher, his rhetoric, and his body language.

  • Latin Language and Literature
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1703
  • 5 of 8 enrolled
  • MWR 04:00 PM-06:00 PM 06/14 - 07/23
  • OLF,

Katherine Walden

CSE 14101 | Elements of Computing I
Katherine Walden

Introduction to programming using the Python language. This course assumes no prior programming experience and emphasizes computational thinking, problem-solving, object-oriented programming, and programming literacy. Topics covered include basic syntax, data types, conditional execution, control flow structures, file I/O, and basic data manipulation. This includes basic programming constructs such as data, variables, functions, conditionals, loops, lists, files, sets, and dictionaries.

  • Computer Science and Engr.
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1283
  • 13 of 30 enrolled
  • MWR 05:00 PM-06:30 PM 05/31 - 07/23
  • OLF,ZODO,

Ramzi Bualuan

CSE 20232 | C/C++ Programming
Ramzi Bualuan

This course introduces students to computational thinking, and develops their ability to solve engineering problems in software. Students will learn structured programming, algorithm analysis and development, C syntax and semantics, logical and syntactical debugging, and software engineering fundamentals. Students will engage in practical, hands-on programming exercises both inside and outside of class.

  • Computer Science and Engr.
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1163
  • 2 of 20 enrolled
  • MTWRF 10:00 AM-11:15 AM 06/14 - 07/23
  • CETE,MET,

Shreya Kumar

CSE 34332 | Progr. Paradigms
Shreya Kumar

Programming language overview: imperative and functional languages; logic programming. Scripting languages and tools. Development environments. Multi-language interfacing. Case studies. Comprehensive programming practice using several languages. Must have taken Data Structures as a pre-req.

  • Computer Science and Engr.
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1285
  • 10 of 30 enrolled
  • MR 05:30 PM-07:30 PM 05/31 - 07/23
  • OLF,ZODO,

Peter Bui

CSE 34872 | Programming Challenges
Peter Bui

This course encourages the development of practical programming and problem solving skills through hands-on practice and guided learning. This class revolves around solving "brain-teaser" and puzzle-type problems that regularly appear in programming contests, online challenges, and job interviews. Topics covered in this course include: performing I/O, processing strings, utilizing data structures, searching and sorting, using recursion, manipulating graphs, and applying advanced algorithmic techniques such as dynamic programming.

  • Computer Science and Engr.
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1286
  • 20 of 35 enrolled
  • MW 07:30 PM-09:00 PM 05/31 - 07/23
  • OLF,ZODO,

Steven Krieg

CSE 44648 | Data Science
Steven Krieg

Data science can be viewed as the art and craft of extracting knowledge from large bodies of structured and unstructured data using methods from many disciplines, including (but not limited to) machine learning, databases, probability and statistics, information theory, and data visualization. This course will focus on the process of data science -- from data acquisition to analytics methods to deployment, and will walk the students through both the technical and use-case aspects in the process. It will place a larger emphasis on the machine learning component, with relevant inclusions and references from other disciplines. The course will give students an opportunity to implement and experiment with some of the concepts as part of a class project, in addition to the hands-on assignments using the Python programming language. Additionally, the course touches upon some of the advances in related topics such as big data and discuss the role of data mining in contemporary society. The course has been designed and developed by Nitesh Chawla, the Frank Freimann Professor of Computer Science and Engineering and Director of iCeNSA at the University of Notre Dame. <p> Note: this course is delivered fully online. The course design combines required live weekly meetings online with self-scheduled lectures, problems, assignments, and interactive learning materials. To participate, students will need to have a computer with webcam, reliable internet connection, and a quiet place to participate in live sessions. <p>Students enrolling in this course should have taken <b> <u> one or more</b> </u> courses or implemented <b> <u>one or more</b> </u> projects involving Python programming and <b> <u>one or more courses</b> </u> in probability or statistics.

  • Computer Science and Engr.
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1289
  • 6 of 15 enrolled
  • TR 07:00 PM-09:00 PM 05/31 - 07/23
  • OLF,ZODO,

Michael Wicks

CSE 44694 | Modern Web and App Dev
Michael Wicks

Today's student lives in an exciting time when one no longer requires a large team of engineers to launch a website or app. A single person with a great idea and grit can bring a product to market, raise awareness around an issue, begin selling online, and communicate visually at scale. This course will focus on topics of modern website and application development. We will begin by exploring static web site design and development utilizing contemporary design trends and modern technologies. We will then focus on creating dynamic web applications. During this course, students will take an idea for a web app and develop it into a working prototype. Students will then progressively add features to their applications while focusing on various engineering challenges that occur in production. They will become proficient in HTML, CSS, and JavaScript. These techniques are used by companies such as Airbnb, Netflix, Medium and PayPal which have all adopted a full stack JavaScript approach, and are very useful to those interested in smaller tech startups as well as tech giants such as Facebook and Google.

  • Computer Science and Engr.
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1287
  • 12 of 25 enrolled
  • TR 05:00 PM-06:30 PM 05/31 - 07/23
  • OLF,ZODO,

Kevin Bowyer

CSE 48901 | Undergraduate Research
Kevin Bowyer

A research project at the undergraduate level under the supervision of a CSE faculty member.

  • Computer Science and Engr.
  • 1.04.0 credits    CRN 1724
  • 1 of 10 enrolled
  • CPTE,

Christian Poellabauer

CSE 48901 | Undergraduate Research
Christian Poellabauer

A research project at the undergraduate level under the supervision of a CSE faculty member.

  • Computer Science and Engr.
  • 1.04.0 credits    CRN 1935
  • 1 of 5 enrolled
  • CPTE,

Meng Jiang

CSE 48901 | Undergraduate Research
Meng Jiang

A research project at the undergraduate level under the supervision of a CSE faculty member.

  • Computer Science and Engr.
  • 1.04.0 credits    CRN 1938
  • 3 of 5 enrolled
  • CPTE,

Chaoli Wang

CSE 48901 | Undergraduate Research
Chaoli Wang

A research project at the undergraduate level under the supervision of a CSE faculty member.

  • Computer Science and Engr.
  • 1.04.0 credits    CRN 2050
  • 1 of 5 enrolled
  • CPTE,

Ramzi Bualuan

CSE 60732 | C/C++ Programming
Ramzi Bualuan

Top-down analysis and structured programming. Basic analysis of algorithms, algorithm development, implementation and debugging and testing of programs will also be emphasized. Students will write several programs in the C++ language to learn the concepts taught and to acquire experience in solving problems using the UNIX operating system.

  • Computer Science and Engr.
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1164
  • 8 of 20 enrolled
  • MTWRF 10:00 AM-11:15 AM 06/14 - 07/23
  • ,

Steven Krieg

CSE 64648 | Data Science
Steven Krieg

Data science can be viewed as the art and craft of extracting knowledge from large bodies of structured and unstructured data using methods from many disciplines, including (but not limited to) machine learning, databases, probability and statistics, information theory, and data visualization. This course will focus on the process of data science -- from data acquisition to analytics methods to deployment, and will walk the students through both the technical and use-case aspects in the process. It will place a larger emphasis on the machine learning component, with relevant inclusions and references from other disciplines. The course will give students an opportunity to implement and experiment with some of the concepts as part of a class project, in addition to the hands-on assignments using the Python programming language. Additionally, the course touches upon some of the advances in related topics such as big data and discuss the role of data mining in contemporary society. The course has been designed and developed by Nitesh Chawla, the Frank Freimann Professor of Computer Science and Engineering and Director of iCeNSA at the University of Notre Dame. <p> Note: this course is delivered fully online. The course design combines required live weekly meetings online with self-scheduled lectures, problems, assignments, and interactive learning materials. To participate, students will need to have a computer with webcam, reliable internet connection, and a quiet place to participate in live sessions. <p>Students enrolling in this course should have taken <b> <u> one or more</b> </u> courses or implemented <b> <u>one or more</b> </u> projects involving Python programming and <b> <u>one or more courses</b> </u> in probability or statistics.

  • Computer Science and Engr.
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1290
  • 2 of 5 enrolled
  • TR 07:00 PM-09:00 PM 05/31 - 07/23
  • OLF,ZODO,

Michael Wicks

CSE 64694 | Modern Web and App Dev
Michael Wicks

Today's student lives in an exciting time when one no longer requires a large team of engineers to launch a website or app. A single person with a great idea and grit can bring a product to market, raise awareness around an issue, begin selling online, and communicate visually at scale.This course will focus on topics of modern website and application development. We will begin by exploring static web site design and development utilizing contemporary design trends and modern technologies. We will then focus on creating dynamic web applications.During this course, students will take an idea for a web app and develop it into a working prototype. Students will then progressively add features to their applications while focusing on various engineering challenges that occur in production. They will become proficient in HTML, CSS, and JavaScript. These techniques are used by companies such as Airbnb, Netflix, Medium and PayPal which have all adopted a full stack JavaScript approach, and are very useful to those interested in smaller tech startups as well as tech giants such as Facebook and Google.

  • Computer Science and Engr.
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2006
  • 4 of 10 enrolled
  • TR 05:00 PM-06:30 PM 06/14 - 07/23
  • OLF,ZODO,

Maureen Collins

CSE 67890 | Independent Summer Research
Maureen Collins

This course is for graduate students receiving a summer stipend and conducting independent research. Registering for this course will ensure proper classification for tax purposes. Only those students both actively engaged in research and receiving a stipend are eligible for this course.

  • Computer Science and Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1741
  • 93 of 120 enrolled
  • ,

CSE 68901 | Thesis Direction

Research to satisfy the six credit hours required for the master's degree.

  • Computer Science and Engr.
  • 0.09.0 credits    CRN 1725
  • 3 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Jaroslaw Nabrzyski

CSE 68901 | Thesis Direction
Jaroslaw Nabrzyski

Research to satisfy the six credit hours required for the master's degree.

  • Computer Science and Engr.
  • 0.09.0 credits    CRN 2049
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

CSE 68905 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch

Required of nonresident master's degree students who are completing their theses in absentia and who wish to retain their degree status.

  • Computer Science and Engr.
  • 1.09.0 credits    CRN 1726
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Michael Niemier

CSE 87001 | Computing RET
Michael Niemier

Non-degree graduate credit for middle and high school teachers participating in summer research program with Notre Dame faculty.

  • Computer Science and Engr.
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1710
  • 12 of 20 enrolled
  • MTWRF 09:00 AM-05:00 PM 06/21 - 07/31
  • OLH,

Jay Brockman

CSE 87101 | CCI RET
Jay Brockman

Non-degree graduate credit for middle and high school teachers participating in summer research with Notre Dame faculty related to the Bowman Creek Educational Ecosystem (BCe2).

  • Computer Science and Engr.
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1831
  • 2 of 5 enrolled
  • MTWRF 09:00 AM-04:00 PM 06/14 - 07/31
  • ,

Nitesh Chawla

CSE 98901 | Research and Dissertation
Nitesh Chawla

Research and dissertation for resident doctoral students.

  • Computer Science and Engr.
  • 0.09.0 credits    CRN 1727
  • 1 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Yiyu Shi

CSE 98901 | Research and Dissertation
Yiyu Shi

Research and dissertation for resident doctoral students.

  • Computer Science and Engr.
  • 0.09.0 credits    CRN 1745
  • 5 of 120 enrolled
  • ,

Tijana Milenkovic

CSE 98901 | Research and Dissertation
Tijana Milenkovic

Research and dissertation for resident doctoral students.

  • Computer Science and Engr.
  • 0.09.0 credits    CRN 1746
  • 1 of 120 enrolled
  • ,

Meng Jiang

CSE 98901 | Research and Dissertation
Meng Jiang

Research and dissertation for resident doctoral students.

  • Computer Science and Engr.
  • 0.09.0 credits    CRN 1853
  • 3 of 120 enrolled
  • ,

Ronald Metoyer

CSE 98901 | Research and Dissertation
Ronald Metoyer

Research and dissertation for resident doctoral students.

  • Computer Science and Engr.
  • 0.09.0 credits    CRN 1854
  • 1 of 120 enrolled
  • ,

Aaron Striegel

CSE 98901 | Research and Dissertation
Aaron Striegel

Research and dissertation for resident doctoral students.

  • Computer Science and Engr.
  • 0.09.0 credits    CRN 1855
  • 1 of 120 enrolled
  • ,

Danny Chen

CSE 98901 | Research and Dissertation
Danny Chen

Research and dissertation for resident doctoral students.

  • Computer Science and Engr.
  • 0.09.0 credits    CRN 1856
  • 2 of 120 enrolled
  • ,

Siddharth Joshi

CSE 98901 | Research and Dissertation
Siddharth Joshi

Research and dissertation for resident doctoral students.

  • Computer Science and Engr.
  • 0.09.0 credits    CRN 1857
  • 1 of 120 enrolled
  • ,

Jane Huang

CSE 98901 | Research and Dissertation
Jane Huang

Research and dissertation for resident doctoral students.

  • Computer Science and Engr.
  • 0.09.0 credits    CRN 1923
  • 1 of 120 enrolled
  • ,

Timothy Weninger

CSE 98901 | Research and Dissertation
Timothy Weninger

Research and dissertation for resident doctoral students.

  • Computer Science and Engr.
  • 0.09.0 credits    CRN 1955
  • 1 of 120 enrolled
  • ,

Walter Scheirer

CSE 98901 | Research and Dissertation
Walter Scheirer

Research and dissertation for resident doctoral students.

  • Computer Science and Engr.
  • 0.09.0 credits    CRN 1981
  • 1 of 120 enrolled
  • ,

Kevin Bowyer

CSE 98901 | Research and Dissertation
Kevin Bowyer

Research and dissertation for resident doctoral students.

  • Computer Science and Engr.
  • 0.09.0 credits    CRN 2048
  • 1 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Anre Venter

CSEM 24104 | College Seminar-Summer Online
Anre Venter

Please visit csem.nd.edu for the specific descriptions associated with each College Seminar section and to learn more about the course. College Seminar is a unique one-semester course shared by all sophomores majoring in the College of Arts and Letters at the University of Notre Dame. The course offers students an introduction to the diversity and distinctive focus of the College. Specific sections vary in topics and texts (i.e. there will not be a shared reading list), but all feature an interdisciplinary approach, commitment to engaging important questions, employment of major works, and emphasis on the development of oral skills.

  • College Seminar
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1665
  • 16 of 16 enrolled
  • MTW 01:30 PM-03:35 PM 06/14 - 07/23
  • CSEM,OLF,ZODO,

Lisa Oglesbee

CSLC 73006 | EAP Graduate Writing
Lisa Oglesbee

The Center for the Study of Languages and Cultures (CSLC) offers this academic and technical writing course in the English for Academic Purposes summer program. The course is specifically designed for current international graduate students and incorporates multiple writing assignments based on a diverse collection of topics that will develop students' vocabulary and grammar alongside writing style with opportunities for individualized feedback. Students will be encouraged to tailor their writing submissions to their own academic field.

  • Ctr for Study of Lang&Cultures
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1850
  • 8 of 14 enrolled
  • MTWRF 08:45 AM-10:15 AM 07/12 - 07/30
  • ,

Lisa Oglesbee

CSLC 73007 | EAP Oral Proficiency
Lisa Oglesbee

The Center for the Study of Languages and Cultures (CSLC) offers this oral proficiency course in the English for Academic Purposes summer program. The course is designed to provide students with strategies for improving their English pronunciation, as well as instruction in and opportunities for giving academic presentations. In addition, teaching skills relevant to teaching/lab assistant roles will be covered and practiced.

  • Ctr for Study of Lang&Cultures
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1851
  • 13 of 14 enrolled
  • MTWRF 10:30 AM-12:00 PM 07/12 - 07/30
  • ,

Lisa Oglesbee

CSLC 73008 | Legal English
Lisa Oglesbee

The course is specifically designed for incoming and current international graduate students in the Law School.

  • Ctr for Study of Lang&Cultures
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1852
  • 0 of 14 enrolled
  • MTWRF 08:45 AM-10:15 AM 07/12 - 07/30
  • ,

Yuliya Fedorovych, Grace Hamilton

DESN 24102 | VCD 1: Fundamentals of Design
Yuliya Fedorovych, Grace Hamilton

Fundamentals of Design is a gateway course for Visual Communication Design that introduces students to basic design elements and concepts like form and space, color, composition, typography, and grids. This course helps develop an understanding of the delicate balance between these design elements and how they can be effectively used in an effort to communicate an idea, thought, or concept. This course builds a vigorous foundation that allows students to acquire visual skill sets that serve as a firm foundation for advanced level courses in Visual Communication Design. *The course has a corequisite lab where students learn Adobe Illustrator, Photoshop, and InDesign. The lab is integrated into this course*

  • Design
  • 4.0 credits    CRN 1562
  • 13 of 15 enrolled
  • MR 01:00 PM-03:00 PM 05/31 - 07/23
  • OLF,ZODO,

James Newman, Ann-Marie Conrado

DESN 24203 | DESN Matters:Intro, DESN Think
James Newman, Ann-Marie Conrado

Silicon Valley Semester: MATERIALS FEE. Design has come more and more to describe not only the development of objects but the process by which one shapes the interactions and experiences of people with the systems, services and organizations around us. A deeply human-centered approach to problem solving, design thinking is centered around identifying and reframing complex problems, and solving them through a more creative, iterative and hands-on approach. This course will follow a series of overlapping modules that will introduce the student to the various steps employed in the design thinking process and becoming familiar with the tools and methodologies used. The course will feature a hybrid seminar format with lectures and case studies followed by hands-on exercises and practical applications of the theories in the form of team projects. Students will be able to apply this methodology to problems of a variety of disciplines from science and engineering to business and the liberal arts. The course is the gateway for the Collaborative Innovation minor. Also taught in several study abroad locations: This module introduces students to the design, presentation, and communication of information in a range of media. It focuses on information types, methods and modes of presentation, and document design and layout. The module provides a foundation of the theory and practice of information design and presentation. It aims to develop understanding of design principles in society and increase critical awareness of information presentation techniques

  • Design
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1649
  • 19 of 26 enrolled
  • MTR 04:00 PM-06:00 PM 06/14 - 07/23
  • ZOSS, FNAR,WKAR

Ann-Marie Conrado

DESN 47203 | Design Matters
Ann-Marie Conrado

<br> <b>For non-degree international students only.</b><br> <br> Design has come more and more to describe not only the development of objects but the process by which one shapes the interactions and experiences of people with the systems, services, and organizations around us. A deeply human-centered approach to problem-solving, design thinking is centered around identifying and reframing complex problems, and solving them through a more creative, iterative, and hands-on approach. This course will follow a series of overlapping modules that will introduce the student to the various steps employed in the design thinking process and becoming familiar with the tools and methodologies used. The course will feature a hybrid seminar format with lectures and case studies followed by hands-on exercises and practical applications of the theories in the form of team projects. Students will be able to apply this methodology to problems of a variety of disciplines from science and engineering to business and the liberal arts. This course will be taught as a hybrid of synchronous online live meetings and asynchronous coursework

  • Design
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1667
  • 0 of 24 enrolled
  • TBA 07/12 - 07/31
  • ,

DESN 67890 | Independent Summer Research

This course is for graduate students receiving a summer stipend and conducting independent research. Registering for this course will ensure proper classification for tax purposes. Only those students both actively engaged in research and receiving a stipend are eligible for this course.

  • Design
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 2040
  • 0 of 1 enrolled
  • ,

Maria Tomasula

DESN 78308 | Thesis Direction
Maria Tomasula

Graduate majors only. Research and writing on an approved subject under the direction of a faculty member.

  • Design
  • 1.010.0 credits    CRN 2041
  • 0 of 1 enrolled
  • ,

Maria Tomasula

DESN 78310 | Thesis Direction-0 credits
Maria Tomasula

Graduate majors only. Research and writing on an approved subject under the direction of a faculty member.

  • Design
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 2054
  • 1 of 1 enrolled
  • ,

Maureen Collins

DMA 67890 | Independent Summer Research
Maureen Collins

This course is for graduate students receiving a summer stipend and conducting independent research. Registering for this course will ensure proper classification for tax purposes. Only those students both actively engaged in research and receiving a stipend are eligible for this course.

  • Doctor of Musical Arts
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1827
  • 4 of 4 enrolled
  • ,

Margot Fassler

DMA 87900 | Special Studies
Margot Fassler

Individual study under personal direction of a faculty member.

  • Doctor of Musical Arts
  • 1.03.0 credits    CRN 2038
  • 0 of 1 enrolled
  • ,

Christopher Chowrimootoo

DMA 88690 | Research and Dissertation
Christopher Chowrimootoo

Research and dissertation for resident doctoral students.

  • Doctor of Musical Arts
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1927
  • 1 of 1 enrolled
  • ,

Carolyn Hardin

DS 64301 | Communication and Storytelling
Carolyn Hardin

This course is designed to develop communication skills for data scientists working in industry and business contexts. Students master the art of clear, effective, and engaging scientific and technical communications, with attention to the business necessity of translating complex technical subjects into actionable insights. Students identify and analyze rhetorical situations in technical discourse communities, assist them in defining their purpose in writing/presenting information, and teach them to design materials and deliver presentations that are properly targeted and appropriately styled.

  • Data Science
  • 1.5 credits    CRN 1533
  • 33 of 40 enrolled
  • M 07:00 PM-10:45 PM 05/24 - 06/27
  • OLF,ZODO,

Scott Nestler

DS 64305 | Ethics/Policy in Data Science
Scott Nestler

Data-informed decision making has created new opportunities, but also expands the set of possible risks to organizations. One of these risks comes from grappling with the "should we?" question with regard to data and analytics, and associated privacy concerns. In this course students are introduced to some of the frameworks to address the issues related to the proper roles of public law, government regulation, and ethics in performing and managing analytics activities. Upon completion, the students should be comfortable adapting one of these ethical frameworks for use in alignment with their organizational missions.

  • Data Science
  • 1.5 credits    CRN 1534
  • 33 of 40 enrolled
  • M 07:00 PM-10:45 PM 06/28 - 08/01
  • OLF,ZODO,

Christopher Frederick

DS 64620 | Databases and Data Security
Christopher Frederick

Calibrated to data science applications, this course focuses on effective techniques in managing, ingesting, retrieving and updating information from a database system. It provides an introduction to relational databases, including topics such as relational calculus and algebra, integrity constraints, distributed databases, and data security. Students are introduced to database technologies utilized in industry, such as NoSQL, graph databases, in-memory databases, querying data over HDFS (Hive), etc. The final project for this course consists of the integration of a database system into an analytics workflow.

  • Data Science
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1539
  • 33 of 40 enrolled
  • R 07:00 PM-10:45 PM 05/24 - 08/01
  • OLF,ZODO,

Forrest Spence

ECON 10010 | Principles of Microeconomics
Forrest Spence

An introduction to economics, with particular attention to the pricing mechanism, competitive and monopolistic markets, government regulation of the economy, labor-management relations and programs, income determination and public policy, trade and the international economy.

  • Economics
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1401
  • 13 of 15 enrolled
  • TWR 10:00 AM-12:15 PM 06/14 - 07/23
  • BA01,ZFYS, SOSC,WKSS

Eva Dziadula

ECON 14022 | Principles of Macroeconomics
Eva Dziadula

A continuation of introduction to economics with emphasis on the measurement of national economic performance, alternative explanations of short-run economic fluctuations and long-run economic growth, money and credit, fiscal and monetary policy.

  • Economics
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1514
  • 3 of 7 enrolled
  • MTR 07:00 PM-08:50 PM 05/31 - 07/15
  • OLF,ZODO,

Forrest Spence

ECON 20010 | Principles of Microeconomics
Forrest Spence

An introduction to economics, with particular attention to the pricing mechanism, competitive and monopolistic markets, government regulation of the economy, labor-management relations and programs, income determination and public policy, trade and the international economy.

  • Economics
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1402
  • 10 of 13 enrolled
  • TWR 10:00 AM-12:15 PM 06/14 - 07/23
  • BA01, SOSC,WKSS

Eva Dziadula

ECON 24022 | Principles of Macroeconomics
Eva Dziadula

A continuation of introduction to economics with emphasis on the measurement of national economic performance, alternative explanations of short-run economic fluctuations and long-run economic growth, money and credit, fiscal and monetary policy.

  • Economics
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1513
  • 15 of 17 enrolled
  • MTR 07:00 PM-08:50 PM 05/31 - 07/15
  • OLF,ZODO,

Maureen Collins

ECON 67890 | Independent Summer Research
Maureen Collins

This course is for graduate students receiving a summer stipend and conducting independent research. Registering for this course will ensure proper classification for tax purposes. Only those students both actively engaged in research and receiving a stipend are eligible for this course.

  • Economics
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 2024
  • 36 of 45 enrolled
  • ,

Drew Creal

ECON 77951 | Research and Dissertation
Drew Creal

This course is taken by a student wishing to earn a research master's degree. The student works under the guidance of one or more faculty member to produce a master's thesis.

  • Economics
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1965
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Drew Creal

ECON 78901 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch
Drew Creal

Required of nonresident graduate students who are completing their dissertations in absentia and who wish to retain their degree status.

  • Economics
  • 1.012.0 credits    CRN 1966
  • 4 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Gail Mayotte

EDU 60022 | Intro to Teaching - Elementary
Gail Mayotte

This course provides an introduction to the meaning and practice of contemporary teaching. It includes historical highlights in public and Catholic education, and considers cultural and social contexts of today?s Catholic schools. Professional, legal, and ethical responsibilities of the teacher are emphasized along with classroom organization and management.

  • Education
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1312
  • 24 of 20 enrolled
  • MTWR 10:15 AM-11:45 AM 05/31 - 06/04 |MTWRF 01:30 PM-04:00 PM 05/31 - 06/04
  • ,

Diane Maletta, Gail Mayotte

EDU 60022 | Intro to Teaching - Elementary
Diane Maletta, Gail Mayotte

This course provides an introduction to the meaning and practice of contemporary teaching. It includes historical highlights in public and Catholic education, and considers cultural and social contexts of today?s Catholic schools. Professional, legal, and ethical responsibilities of the teacher are emphasized along with classroom organization and management.

  • Education
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1313
  • 8 of 20 enrolled
  • MTWR 10:15 AM-11:45 AM 05/31 - 06/03 |MTWRF 01:30 PM-04:00 PM 05/31 - 06/04
  • ,

Alec Torigian, Colleen Knight Santoni, Gail Mayotte

EDU 60024 | Intro to Teaching - Middle Sch
Alec Torigian, Colleen Knight Santoni, Gail Mayotte

This course provides an introduction to the meaning and practice of contemporary teaching. It includes historical highlights in public and Catholic education, and considers cultural and social contexts of today?s Catholic schools. Professional, legal, and ethical responsibilities of the teacher are emphasized along with classroom organization and management.

  • Education
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1314
  • 33 of 35 enrolled
  • MTWR 10:15 AM-11:45 AM 05/31 - 06/04 |MTWRF 01:30 PM-04:00 PM 05/31 - 06/04
  • ,

Michael Macaluso, Gail Mayotte

EDU 60026 | Intro to Teaching -High School
Michael Macaluso, Gail Mayotte

This course provides an introduction to the meaning and practice of contemporary teaching. It includes historical highlights in public and Catholic education, and considers cultural and social contexts of today?s Catholic schools. Professional, legal, and ethical responsibilities of the teacher are emphasized along with classroom organization and management.

  • Education
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1315
  • 32 of 35 enrolled
  • MTWR 10:15 AM-11:45 AM 05/31 - 06/04 |MTWRF 01:30 PM-04:00 PM 05/31 - 06/04
  • ,

Louis DelFra, Gail Mayotte

EDU 60060 | Teaching in Cath Schools
Louis DelFra, Gail Mayotte

An overview of six core topics of Catholic teaching along with a discussion of their influence and impact on Catholic school culture and teaching

  • Education
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1316
  • 57 of 65 enrolled
  • M 03:10 PM-05:00 PM 06/07 - 07/19
  • ,

William Mattison, Gail Mayotte

EDU 60070 | Teaching Rel in Cath Schools
William Mattison, Gail Mayotte

An overview of six core topics of Catholic teaching along with initial planning with grade level master teachers to teach these topics in Catholic schools.

  • Education
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1317
  • 40 of 50 enrolled
  • M 03:10 PM-05:00 PM 06/07 - 07/19
  • ,

Monica Kowalski, Gail Mayotte

EDU 60102 | Effctve Elem Clsrm Tchng
Monica Kowalski, Gail Mayotte

An introduction to the culture and dynamics of the elementary school classroom with emphasis placed on planning, instruction, and assessment practices to meet relevant standards and goals. The course includes an integrative survey of research-based methods that lead to effective daily instruction to meet the needs of all elementary-aged learners.

  • Education
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 1318
  • 33 of 35 enrolled
  • MTWRF 09:00 AM-11:00 AM 06/07 - 06/11 |M 01:10 PM-03:00 PM 06/14 - 07/05 |TWR 01:10 PM-02:00 PM 06/15 - 06/30 |TWR 01:10 PM-02:00 PM 07/06 - 07/08
  • ,

Patrick Kirkland, Gail Mayotte

EDU 60112 | Mathematics in Elem Ed II
Patrick Kirkland, Gail Mayotte

In this course, participants will draw on their experiences as educators to improve their capacity to apply content-specific pedagogies in the elementary setting (K-6). By examining evidenced-based practices and discussing key features of state and NCTM standards, participants will be expected to refine and enhance how they design instruction and assessments that implement core mathematics teaching practices.

  • Education
  • 0.5 credits    CRN 1560
  • 30 of 30 enrolled
  • MTR 01:10 PM-02:00 PM 06/09 - 06/24
  • ,

Patrick Kirkland, Gail Mayotte

EDU 60132 | Mathematics in Elem Educ
Patrick Kirkland, Gail Mayotte

The development of the mathematical and pedagogical content knowledge for teaching mathematics in the elementary classroom (K-6). The course gives attention to learning theory, evidenced-based instructional methods, frameworks, and assessment practices, and standards of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics

  • Education
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 1319
  • 33 of 35 enrolled
  • MTWRF 11:10 AM-12:10 PM 06/07 - 06/11 |W 02:10 PM-04:40 PM 06/16 - 06/23 |W 02:10 PM-04:40 PM 07/07 - 07/07 |M 12:55 PM-03:00 PM 07/12 - 07/12 |TWR 03:10 PM-05:15 PM 07/13 - 07/21
  • ,

Jodene Morrell, Gail Mayotte

EDU 60142 | Reading and Lang Arts in Elem
Jodene Morrell, Gail Mayotte

An integrated approach to literacy instruction designed to help children make sense of the world through literacy expression of all language arts elements including grammar, spelling, writing, and speaking and listening skills as well as continuing their understanding of essential reading components using quality children's literature and multi-sensory approaches. Course content will include a focus on assessment with readings on current research, practice in constructing traditional and performance assessments in relation to stated unit goals, and analyses of results to inform future planning and instruction.

  • Education
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1320
  • 30 of 31 enrolled
  • MTW 02:10 PM-04:40 PM 06/28 - 06/30 |MTWR 02:10 PM-04:40 PM 07/05 - 07/08 |F 01:10 PM-03:40 PM 07/09 - 07/16 |M 03:10 PM-05:15 PM 07/12 - 07/12 |MTWR 03:10 PM-05:15 PM 07/14 - 07/21
  • ,

Martha Beesley, Gail Mayotte

EDU 60162 | Content Methods for Elem Educ
Martha Beesley, Gail Mayotte

A review of content-specific methods framed by readings on theory and evidence-based practices and frameworks will enable participants to develop cohesive units of study which integrate reading, writing, mathematics, social studies and science.

  • Education
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 1321
  • 30 of 31 enrolled
  • MTWR 02:10 PM-04:15 PM 06/09 - 06/24 |F 01:10 PM-03:00 PM 06/11 - 06/25
  • ,

Erin Wibbens, Gail Mayotte

EDU 60182 | Teaching of Reading
Erin Wibbens, Gail Mayotte

An exploration of the research and instructional strategies of reading instruction including emergent literacy, reading readiness, phonemic awareness, phonics, word recognition, vocabulary development, fluency, cultural literacy, and reading comprehension, as well as direct, explicit, and multi-sensory strategies for reading remediation.

  • Education
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1322
  • 33 of 35 enrolled
  • TWR 02:10 PM-04:40 PM 06/08 - 06/10 |F 01:10 PM-03:40 PM 06/11 - 06/25 |TR 02:10 PM-04:40 PM 06/15 - 06/29 |W 02:10 PM-04:40 PM 06/30 - 06/30 |TR 02:10 PM-04:40 PM 07/06 - 07/08 |F 01:10 PM-03:40 PM 07/09 - 07/09
  • ,

Jessica Fries-Gaither, Gail Mayotte

EDU 60192 | Sci and SS Teaching in Elem
Jessica Fries-Gaither, Gail Mayotte

An introduction to methods for teaching elementary science and social studies with a focus on selecting standards-based content, developing inquiry-based lessons, and finding and using appropriate resources.

  • Education
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1323
  • 32 of 35 enrolled
  • TWRF 12:55 PM-03:00 PM 07/14 - 07/21 |M 12:55 PM-03:00 PM 07/19 - 07/19
  • ,

Gail Mayotte

EDU 60204 | Foundations of MS Teaching
Gail Mayotte

An introduction to the culture and dynamics of the middle school classroom with emphasis placed on planning, instruction, and assessment practices to meet relevant standards and goals. The course includes an integrative survey of research-based methods that lead to effective daily instruction to meet the needs of all young adolescent learners.

  • Education
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1324
  • 32 of 35 enrolled
  • MTWRF 09:00 AM-11:15 AM 06/07 - 06/11 |MWF 01:10 PM-03:00 PM 06/14 - 06/30 |MWF 01:10 PM-03:00 PM 07/05 - 07/09 |MF 01:10 PM-03:00 PM 07/12 - 07/19 |W 01:10 PM-02:00 PM 07/14 - 07/21
  • ,

Mark Johnson, Gail Mayotte

EDU 60256 | Foundations of HS Teaching
Mark Johnson, Gail Mayotte

An introduction to the culture and dynamics of the high school classroom with emphasis placed on planning, instruction, and assessment practices to meet relevant standards and goals. The course includes an integrative survey of research-based methods that lead to effective daily instruction to meet the needs of all adolescent learners.

  • Education
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1325
  • 32 of 35 enrolled
  • MTWRF 09:00 AM-11:15 AM 06/07 - 06/11 |MWF 01:10 PM-03:00 PM 06/14 - 06/30 |MWF 01:10 PM-03:00 PM 07/05 - 07/09 |MF 01:10 PM-03:00 PM 07/12 - 07/19 |W 01:10 PM-02:00 PM 07/14 - 07/21
  • ,

Hillary Russell, Christine Bonfiglio, Gail Mayotte

EDU 60312 | Inclusive Teach Practices Elem
Hillary Russell, Christine Bonfiglio, Gail Mayotte

A survey in inclusive education with emphasis on the elementary-aged student is followed by an in-depth study of the common learning issues in the elementary grades. Academics, behavior, and executive functioning are addressed with a focus on strategies and assessment.

  • Education
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1326
  • 30 of 31 enrolled
  • MTWRF 08:00 AM-10:00 AM 06/09 - 06/30 |MTW 08:00 AM-10:00 AM 07/05 - 07/07
  • ,

Emily Kubaszak, Christine Bonfiglio, Gail Mayotte

EDU 60324 | Inclusive Teach Practices MS
Emily Kubaszak, Christine Bonfiglio, Gail Mayotte

A survey in inclusive education with emphasis on the early adolescent student is followed by an in-depth study of the common learning issues in the middle grades. Academics, behavior, and executive functioning are addressed with a focus on strategies and assessment.

  • Education
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1327
  • 30 of 32 enrolled
  • MTWRF 08:00 AM-10:00 AM 06/09 - 06/30 |MTW 08:00 AM-10:00 AM 07/05 - 07/07
  • ,

Abby Giroux, Christine Bonfiglio, Gail Mayotte

EDU 60336 | Inclusive Teach Practices HS
Abby Giroux, Christine Bonfiglio, Gail Mayotte

A survey in inclusive education with emphasis on the adolescent student is followed by an in-depth study of the common learning issues in the high school grades. Academics, behavior, and executive functioning are addressed with a focus on strategies and assessment.

  • Education
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1328
  • 26 of 28 enrolled
  • MTWRF 08:00 AM-10:00 AM 06/09 - 06/30 |MTW 08:00 AM-10:00 AM 07/05 - 07/07
  • ,

Andrea Christensen, Gail Mayotte

EDU 60455 | Devel/Moral Educ in Child/Adol
Andrea Christensen, Gail Mayotte

A systematic treatment of cognitive, social, biological, and personality development during childhood through late adolescence relating to education and an examination of the theoretical and research bases of moral development and their implications for P-12 classrooms.

  • Education
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1464
  • 21 of 25 enrolled
  • MTWRF 10:10 AM-11:50 AM 06/09 - 06/30 |MTWRF 10:10 AM-11:50 AM 07/05 - 07/09 |T 01:00 PM-04:00 PM 07/13 - 07/13
  • ,

Luis Mendez Perez, Gail Mayotte

EDU 60455 | Devel/Moral Educ in Child/Adol
Luis Mendez Perez, Gail Mayotte

A systematic treatment of cognitive, social, biological, and personality development during childhood through late adolescence relating to education and an examination of the theoretical and research bases of moral development and their implications for P-12 classrooms.

  • Education
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1465
  • 21 of 25 enrolled
  • MTWRF 10:10 AM-11:50 AM 06/09 - 06/30 |MTWRF 10:10 AM-11:50 AM 07/05 - 07/09 |T 01:00 PM-04:00 PM 07/13 - 07/13
  • ,

Daniel Lapsley, Gail Mayotte

EDU 60455 | Devel/Moral Educ in Child/Adol
Daniel Lapsley, Gail Mayotte

A systematic treatment of cognitive, social, biological, and personality development during childhood through late adolescence relating to education and an examination of the theoretical and research bases of moral development and their implications for P-12 classrooms.

  • Education
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1466
  • 22 of 25 enrolled
  • MTWRF 10:10 AM-11:50 AM 06/09 - 06/30 |MTWRF 10:10 AM-11:50 AM 07/05 - 07/09 |T 01:00 PM-04:00 PM 07/13 - 07/13
  • ,

Nicole McNeil, Gail Mayotte

EDU 60455 | Devel/Moral Educ in Child/Adol
Nicole McNeil, Gail Mayotte

A systematic treatment of cognitive, social, biological, and personality development during childhood through late adolescence relating to education and an examination of the theoretical and research bases of moral development and their implications for P-12 classrooms.

  • Education
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1467
  • 22 of 25 enrolled
  • MTWRF 10:10 AM-11:50 AM 06/09 - 06/30 |MTWRF 10:10 AM-11:50 AM 07/05 - 07/09 |T 01:00 PM-04:00 PM 07/13 - 07/13
  • ,

Kati Macaluso, Gail Mayotte, Michael Macaluso

EDU 60605 | English/Lang Arts Educ I
Kati Macaluso, Gail Mayotte, Michael Macaluso

In this course, participants will extend their developing knowledge of curriculum and instructional planning to reflect the unique content and skill of English/Language Arts pedagogy. By exploring current research from peer reviewed literature, examining evidenced-based practices, discussing key features of state and NCTE standards, and simulating relevant instructional scenarios, participants will begin to plan and deliver high-impact learning experiences for their middle and high school students.

  • Education
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 1474
  • 19 of 17 enrolled
  • TWR 02:10 PM-04:40 PM 06/08 - 06/10 |TR 02:10 PM-04:40 PM 06/15 - 06/24 |TW 02:10 PM-04:40 PM 06/29 - 06/30 |TR 02:10 PM-04:40 PM 07/06 - 07/08
  • ,

Meghan Fagan, Brian Collier, Gail Mayotte

EDU 60625 | Social Studies Educ I
Meghan Fagan, Brian Collier, Gail Mayotte

In this course, participants will extend their developing knowledge of curriculum and instructional planning to reflect the unique content, skill and literacy-related priorities of Social Studies pedagogy. By exploring current research from peer reviewed literature, examining evidenced-based practices, discussing key features of state and NCSS standards, and simulating relevant instructional scenarios, participants will begin to plan and deliver high-impact learning experiences for their middle and high school students.

  • Education
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 1475
  • 14 of 16 enrolled
  • TWR 02:10 PM-04:40 PM 06/08 - 06/10 |TR 02:10 PM-04:40 PM 06/15 - 06/24 |TW 02:10 PM-04:40 PM 06/29 - 06/30 |TR 02:10 PM-04:40 PM 07/06 - 07/08
  • ,

Christine Trinter, Gail Mayotte

EDU 60665 | Mathematics Educ I
Christine Trinter, Gail Mayotte

In this course, participants will extend their developing knowledge of curriculum and instructional planning to reflect the unique content and skill of Mathematics pedagogy. By exploring current research from peer reviewed literature, examining evidenced-based practices, discussing key features of state and NCTM standards, and simulating relevant instructional scenarios, participants will begin to plan and deliver high-impact learning experiences for their middle and high school students.

  • Education
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 1476
  • 18 of 19 enrolled
  • TWR 02:10 PM-04:40 PM 06/08 - 06/10 |TR 02:10 PM-04:40 PM 06/15 - 06/24 |TW 02:10 PM-04:40 PM 06/29 - 06/30 |TR 02:10 PM-04:40 PM 07/06 - 07/08
  • ,

Matthew Kloser, Gail Mayotte

EDU 60685 | Science Educ I
Matthew Kloser, Gail Mayotte

In this course, participants will extend their developing knowledge of curriculum and instructional planning to reflect the unique content, skill and literacy-related priorities of Science pedagogy. By exploring current research from peer reviewed literature, examining evidenced-based practices, discussing key features of state and NSTA standards, and simulating relevant instructional scenarios, participants will begin to plan and deliver high-impact learning experiences for their middle and high school students.

  • Education
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 1477
  • 13 of 15 enrolled
  • TWR 02:10 PM-04:40 PM 06/08 - 06/10 |TR 02:10 PM-04:40 PM 06/15 - 06/24 |TW 02:10 PM-04:40 PM 06/29 - 06/30 |TR 02:10 PM-04:40 PM 07/06 - 07/08
  • ,

Edward Caron, Gail Mayotte

EDU 60695 | Literacy in the Content Areas
Edward Caron, Gail Mayotte

This course will focus on reading and writing in the content areas and introduce literacy strategies, resources, and assessments for use in middle and high school classrooms. Specific attention will be given to teaching and learning of texts with scientifically-based reading components of comprehension, vocabulary development, use of language to support learning, and informal and formal writing. Inclusion of interventions that are direct, explicit, and multi-sensory are provided.

  • Education
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1478
  • 64 of 60 enrolled
  • TWR 02:10 PM-04:40 PM 07/13 - 07/21
  • ,

Kati Macaluso, Gail Mayotte, Michael Macaluso

EDU 60705 | English/Lang Arts Educ II
Kati Macaluso, Gail Mayotte, Michael Macaluso

In this course, participants will draw on their experiences as educators to improve their capacity to apply content-specific pedagogies in a middle and high school setting. By analyzing peer-reviewed literature, examining evidenced-based practices, discussing key features of state and NCTE standards, and simulating relevant instructional scenarios, participants will be expected to refine and enhance how they design learning experiences and assessments that implement key aspects of English/Language Arts pedagogy.

  • Education
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1479
  • 12 of 15 enrolled
  • WR 02:10 PM-04:40 PM 06/09 - 06/10 |M 02:10 PM-04:40 PM 06/14 - 07/19 |TR 02:10 PM-04:40 PM 06/15 - 06/24 |TW 02:10 PM-04:40 PM 06/29 - 06/30 |TR 02:10 PM-04:40 PM 07/06 - 07/08
  • ,

Meghan Fagan, Brian Collier, Gail Mayotte

EDU 60725 | Social Studies Educ II
Meghan Fagan, Brian Collier, Gail Mayotte

In this course, participants will draw on their experiences as educators to improve their capacity to apply content-specific pedagogies in a middle and high school setting. By analyzing peer-reviewed literature, examining evidenced-based practices, discussing key features of state and NCSS standards, and simulating relevant instructional scenarios, participants will be expected to refine and enhance how they design learning experiences and assessments that implement key aspects of Social Studies pedagogy.

  • Education
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1480
  • 14 of 16 enrolled
  • WR 02:10 PM-04:40 PM 06/09 - 06/10 |M 02:10 PM-04:40 PM 06/14 - 07/19 |TR 02:10 PM-04:40 PM 06/15 - 06/24 |TW 02:10 PM-04:40 PM 06/29 - 06/30 |TR 02:10 PM-04:40 PM 07/06 - 07/08
  • ,

Christine Trinter, Gail Mayotte

EDU 60765 | Mathematics Educ II
Christine Trinter, Gail Mayotte

In this course, participants will draw on their experiences as educators to improve their capacity to apply content-specific pedagogies in a middle and high school setting. By analyzing peer-reviewed literature, examining evidenced-based practices, discussing key features of state and NCTM standards, and simulating relevant instructional scenarios, participants will be expected to refine and enhance how they design learning experiences and assessments that implement key aspects of Mathematics pedagogy.

  • Education
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1481
  • 15 of 17 enrolled
  • WR 02:10 PM-04:40 PM 06/09 - 06/10 |M 02:10 PM-04:40 PM 06/14 - 07/19 |TR 02:10 PM-04:40 PM 06/15 - 06/24 |TW 02:10 PM-04:40 PM 06/29 - 06/30 |TR 02:10 PM-04:40 PM 07/06 - 07/08
  • ,

Sinead Brien, Gail Mayotte, Matthew Kloser

EDU 60785 | Science Educ II
Sinead Brien, Gail Mayotte, Matthew Kloser

In this course, participants will draw on their experiences as educators to improve their capacity to apply content-specific pedagogies in a middle and high school setting. By analyzing peer-reviewed literature, examining evidenced-based practices, discussing key features of state and NSTA standards, and simulating relevant instructional scenarios, participants will be expected to refine and enhance how they design learning experiences and assessments that implement key aspects of Science pedagogy.

  • Education
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1482
  • 15 of 15 enrolled
  • WR 02:10 PM-04:40 PM 06/09 - 06/10 |M 02:10 PM-04:40 PM 06/14 - 07/19 |TWR 02:10 PM-04:40 PM 06/15 - 06/30
  • ,

Nathan Wills, Gail Mayotte

EDU 60865 | Blended Learning
Nathan Wills, Gail Mayotte

This course introduces models of Blended Learning, strengths and weaknesses of Blended Learning models, and content delivery options.

  • Education
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1483
  • 0 of 30 enrolled
  • M 12:55 PM-03:00 PM 07/12 - 07/12 |MTWR 12:55 PM-03:00 PM 07/14 - 07/21
  • ,

Kathryn Lichon, Gail Mayotte

EDU 60875 | Supporting ELL
Kathryn Lichon, Gail Mayotte

Introduction to the process of language acquisition. Additional focus upon practical pedagogical strategies for supporting English Language Learners(ELLs) at all age levels.

  • Education
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1473
  • 86 of 90 enrolled
  • MTWRF 09:30 AM-12:00 PM 07/12 - 07/16
  • ,

John Schoenig, Gail Mayotte

EDU 63500 | Integrative Seminar
John Schoenig, Gail Mayotte

An integration of the professional, communal, and spiritual dimensions of the ACE program. Participants engage in active listening as well as interactive and collaborative learning exercises to integrate these pillars of ACE in their professional service to Catholic schools.

  • Education
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1468
  • 183 of 190 enrolled
  • MTWR 08:30 AM-10:00 AM 05/31 - 06/03 |T 07:30 PM-08:45 PM 06/01 - 06/01 |F 08:30 AM-11:45 AM 06/04 - 06/04 |T 07:00 PM-08:45 PM 06/08 - 07/20 |W 06:30 PM-08:30 PM 06/23 - 06/23
  • ,

Eugene Buczynski, Gail Mayotte

EDU 65032 | Practicum - Elementary
Eugene Buczynski, Gail Mayotte

An intense practicum in the local area schools during the summer. The clinical experience will include closely supervised teaching as well as reflections on that experience. Extensive planning of instruction is required.

  • Education
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 1469
  • 32 of 30 enrolled
  • MTWRF 08:00 AM-12:00 PM 06/14 - 06/30 |MTWRF 08:00 AM-12:00 PM 07/05 - 07/21
  • ,

Eugene Buczynski, Gail Mayotte

EDU 65034 | Practicum - Middle School
Eugene Buczynski, Gail Mayotte

An intense practicum in the local area schools during the summer. The clinical experience will include closely supervised teaching as well as reflections on that experience. Extensive planning of instruction is required.

  • Education
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 1470
  • 32 of 35 enrolled
  • MTWRF 08:00 AM-12:00 PM 06/14 - 06/30 |MTWRF 08:00 AM-12:00 PM 07/05 - 07/21
  • ,

Eugene Buczynski, Gail Mayotte

EDU 65036 | Practicum - High School
Eugene Buczynski, Gail Mayotte

An intense practicum in the local area schools during the summer. The clinical experience will include closely supervised teaching as well as reflections on that experience. Extensive planning of instruction is required.

  • Education
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 1471
  • 32 of 35 enrolled
  • MTWRF 08:00 AM-12:00 PM 06/14 - 06/30 |MTWRF 08:00 AM-12:00 PM 07/05 - 07/21
  • ,

Brian Collier, Gail Mayotte

EDU 67980 | Special Topics in Education
Brian Collier, Gail Mayotte

This course provides an opportunity for students to explore issues and experiences in education with the approval of the Academic Director.

  • Education
  • 1.03.0 credits    CRN 1472
  • 1 of 15 enrolled
  • TBA 05/31 - 07/21
  • OLF,

Erin Wibbens, Gail Mayotte

EDU 67980 | Special Topics in Education
Erin Wibbens, Gail Mayotte

This course provides an opportunity for students to explore issues and experiences in education with the approval of the Academic Director.

  • Education
  • 1.03.0 credits    CRN 1941
  • 1 of 5 enrolled
  • TBA 05/31 - 07/23
  • OLF,

Allison Longton

EDU 70100 | Linguistic & Lang. Acquisition
Allison Longton

This course addresses linguistics, components of language, and the principles of first- and second- language acquisition. Content includes theory and evidence-based research of language acquisition and development, the purposes that language serves, and the key roles of oral, written, and nonverbal communication in literacy development in the context of elementary, middle, and secondary levels.

  • Education
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1523
  • 39 of 45 enrolled
  • MTWRF 12:00 PM-03:30 PM 07/12 - 07/22
  • OLF,ZODO,

Laura Hamman

EDU 70110 | Teaching 2nd Language Learners
Laura Hamman

This course addresses the foundational principles of English learner instruction and language acquisition as applied to EL instruction and assessment. Content includes the integration of social, cultural, psychological, and pedagogical influences; historical and legal background of second language instruction; literacy, writing, and oral language development; and multicultural literature in the context of elementary, middle, and secondary levels.

  • Education
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1522
  • 37 of 45 enrolled
  • MTWR 12:00 PM-03:30 PM 06/28 - 07/01 |MTWRF 12:00 PM-03:30 PM 07/05 - 07/09
  • OLF,ZODO,

Christine Bonfiglio

EDU 70200 | Foundation in Inclusive Ed
Christine Bonfiglio

An introduction to inclusive education with a focus on understanding learner attributes including academic, behavioral, social/emotional and health issues is provided. Historical, philosophical, and ethical perspectives serve as a foundation for understanding learning strengths and challenges. Evidence-based frameworks and practices that seek to address complex learning needs promoting inclusive practice are emphasized. Clinical experiences in a Catholic school are required.

  • Education
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1391
  • 18 of 35 enrolled
  • MWF 01:00 PM-04:00 PM 05/24 - 06/27
  • OLF,ZODO,

Christine Bonfiglio, Michael Faggella-Luby, Sean Smith

EDU 70201 | Critical Elements Inclusion
Christine Bonfiglio, Michael Faggella-Luby, Sean Smith

Critical elements of planning and instruction within a multi-tiered system of support are addressed. Assessment and data-based decision making are examined to address the learning needs of students who struggle in the classroom environment. Attention is given to accommodations and curricular modifications, as well as frameworks and strategies that impact behavior. Clinical experiences in a Catholic school are required.

  • Education
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 1392
  • 18 of 35 enrolled
  • MTWRF 03:00 PM-04:00 PM 06/28 - 07/23
  • ,

Christine Bonfiglio, Sean Smith

EDU 70202 | Collaboration, Community & Cul
Christine Bonfiglio, Sean Smith

Critical elements of professional collaboration and consultation within a multi-tiered system of support are addressed. Communication, roles/responsibilities, and culture of key stakeholders are a central focus. Teaming and problem-solving models are examined to address the needs of students who struggle in the classroom environment. Clinical experiences in a Catholic school are required.

  • Education
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 1393
  • 10 of 35 enrolled
  • MTWRF 03:00 PM-04:00 PM 06/07 - 07/04
  • OLF,ZODO,

Christine Bonfiglio, Michael Faggella-Luby, Sean Smith

EDU 70204 | Policy & Practice Special Ed.
Christine Bonfiglio, Michael Faggella-Luby, Sean Smith

Effective practice and implications of special education policy for learners with diverse needs are provided. Specialized methods of service delivery are addressed for students with diagnoses. Attention is given to accommodations, curricular modifications, sensory integration, and transition planning. Evidence-based practices are advanced to enable successful individualized educational planning. Clinical experiences in a Catholic school are required.

  • Education
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1399
  • 10 of 35 enrolled
  • URFS 08:00 AM-05:00 PM 07/15 - 07/18 |M 08:00 AM-09:00 PM 07/19 - 07/19 |TWR 08:00 AM-05:00 PM 07/20 - 07/22
  • ,

Michael Zelenka, Kathleen Carr

EDU 70610 | School Organizational Culture
Michael Zelenka, Kathleen Carr

This course introduces candidates to the concepts and skills needed to build a school-wide culture of achievement aligned to a vision of success for every student. Candidates develop a theoretical framework for creating and sustaining a strong, positive, intentional school culture aligned with the mission, vision, beliefs, and values of school leaders. In particular, the course focuses on articulating a set of root beliefs and core values that inform a culture of achievement and establish a climate of high expectations for academics and character development. Candidates are introduced to a process that ensures that each policy, procedure and program is reflective of the culture of the school community's unique history, mission, and beliefs.

  • Education
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1511
  • 39 of 42 enrolled
  • MTRF 10:20 AM-12:20 PM 06/28 - 07/22
  • ,

Betsy Okello, Kathleen Carr, Kelly O'Leary

EDU 70611 | Org. Mgmt. & Board Gov.
Betsy Okello, Kathleen Carr, Kelly O'Leary

This course introduces candidates to the executive management skills necessary to support school improvement and achieve educational excellence. Candidates are introduced to board governance and board management concepts and skills. Candidates learn strategies and best practices in how to seek new resources to support school programs and advance the institutional mission. This course has a particular focus on planning, managing, and monitoring mission-driven advancement goals.

  • Education
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1506
  • 39 of 42 enrolled
  • MTRF 01:40 PM-03:40 PM 06/28 - 07/22
  • ,

Mary Jones, April Garcia, Jennifer Beltramo, Kathleen Carr

EDU 70612 | Curriculum & Standards Algnmnt
Mary Jones, April Garcia, Jennifer Beltramo, Kathleen Carr

This course introduces candidates to the leadership skills necessary to ensure high quality teaching and learning school-wide. Candidates learn a framework for fostering effective school-wide instruction, assessment, and curriculum as the instructional leader of a school. This course also prepares candidates to implement structures that support a culture for learning in schools including: rigorous standards-based curriculum, core instructional practices, classroom observation, teacher collaboration, and cycles of inquiry around student data and assessment. Candidates develop a comprehensive understanding of research-based curriculum and instructional practices, situated within a framework of a culture for learning that promotes the success of all students.

  • Education
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1503
  • 39 of 42 enrolled
  • MTRF 08:00 AM-10:00 AM 06/28 - 07/22
  • ,

Michael Zelenka, Kathleen Carr, Ryan Clark

EDU 70620 | Leading Change & Communities
Michael Zelenka, Kathleen Carr, Ryan Clark

This course prepares candidates to implement a school-wide culture of achievement aligned to the school's vision of success for every student. Candidates will build on their organizational framework for creating and sustaining a strong, positive, intentional school culture aligned with the mission, vision, beliefs, and values of school leaders and focus on developing plans to communicate and work collaboratively with individuals and groups inside and outside the school to promote continuous improvement. Candidates learn how to establish an organizational culture of urgency in which students, parents/guardians, teachers, staff, and other key stakeholders relentlessly pursue academic and behavioral excellence, and they learn effective strategies to forge consensus for change, manage and monitor change, and secure cooperation from key stakeholders in planning and implementing change.

  • Education
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1508
  • 38 of 40 enrolled
  • MTRF 08:00 AM-10:00 AM 06/28 - 07/22
  • ,

Sandria Morten, David Sorkin, Kathleen Carr

EDU 70621 | Inst. Adv. & Facilities Mgmt.
Sandria Morten, David Sorkin, Kathleen Carr

This course further prepares candidates to develop the executive management skills necessary to support school improvement and achieve educational excellence. Candidates learn to establish and lead an administrative team, to delegate and support staff, and to establish priorities and objectives daily, weekly, monthly, and annually. Candidates will learn the technological tools and systems to facilitate communication and collaboration while learning to address controversial issues as the public and political roles of school leaders. This course will also introduce best practices for the safe and efficient operation of the physical plant.

  • Education
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1507
  • 38 of 40 enrolled
  • MTRF 01:40 PM-03:40 PM 06/28 - 07/22
  • ,

Mary Jones, Jennifer Beltramo, Kathleen Carr

EDU 70622 | Data, Observation, & Feedback
Mary Jones, Jennifer Beltramo, Kathleen Carr

This course prepares candidates to foster professional learning communities as an ongoing process of mission-driven and data-informed improvement within their schools. Candidates will deepen their knowledge of collaborative teacher learning and evidence-driven cycles of inquiry that will strengthen student achievement and ensure effective teaching and learning school-wide.

  • Education
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1505
  • 38 of 40 enrolled
  • MTRF 10:20 AM-12:20 PM 06/28 - 07/22
  • ,

Nathan Wills, Judith Madden, Kathleen Carr, Sarah Perkins, William Mattison

EDU 73622 | Models of Leadership
Nathan Wills, Judith Madden, Kathleen Carr, Sarah Perkins, William Mattison

?This course seeks to form students as integrated spiritual leaders in their school and community. Candidates are prepared to be self-reflective and spiritually connected to our Catholic faith as they cultivate their interior life and grow as zealous disciples of Jesus Christ. In particular, they do this throughout this semester by developing a theological and pastoral understanding of the Remick Leadership Program Root Beliefs. Students are challenged to create strategies to adapt and apply these insights to their Catholic school and community context.

  • Education
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1509
  • 77 of 82 enrolled
  • MTRF 04:00 PM-05:30 PM 06/28 - 07/22
  • ,

Louis DelFra, Kathleen Carr

EDU 73624 | Integrated Leadership
Louis DelFra, Kathleen Carr

This course prepares candidates to cultivate habits of lifelong, transformational leaders. It focuses on integrating reflective practice, spiritual growth, and community formation through the three primary domains of school leadership: instructional leadership, executive management, and school culture.

  • Education
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1510
  • 46 of 46 enrolled
  • MF 10:40 AM-12:00 PM 06/28 - 07/09
  • ,

Kole Knueppel, Gregory O'Donnell, Kathleen Carr

EDU 73640 | Transformational Leadership
Kole Knueppel, Gregory O'Donnell, Kathleen Carr

In this course candidates have an opportunity to learn from transformational leaders from a variety of sectors. Through storytelling and reflection on how they live out the Remick Leadership Program disposition, these leaders inspire candidates to transform Catholic schools and the Church.

  • Education
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1500
  • 46 of 46 enrolled
  • MTRF 01:40 PM-03:50 PM 06/28 - 07/10
  • ,

Betsy Okello, David Sorkin, Kathleen Carr, Kelly O'Leary, Sandria Morten

EDU 73643 | Inquiry & Intervention III
Betsy Okello, David Sorkin, Kathleen Carr, Kelly O'Leary, Sandria Morten

Over the course of the second year, candidates use methods from the fields of action research and improvement science to lead improvement in their school. During this course candidates integrate the knowledge and skills they have gained throughout the course and Remick program to present their findings, reflect on the process of leading change, and make recommendations for future action. Candidates present their findings at annual Remick Leadership Conference.

  • Education
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 1499
  • 45 of 46 enrolled
  • MTRF 08:00 AM-10:20 AM 06/28 - 07/10
  • ,

Scott Howard

EE 08999 | Research Experience HS
Scott Howard

This is a zero-credit course for students engaged in independent research or working with a faculty member or a member of the University staff on a special project. Registration requires a brief description of the research or project to be pursued and the permission of the director of the Summer Session. No course work is required.

  • Electrical Engineering
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1762
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Robert Stevenson

EE 48499 | Undergraduate Research
Robert Stevenson

A research project at the undergraduate level under the supervision of a faculty member.

  • Electrical Engineering
  • 1.010.0 credits    CRN 1763
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ZUG1,

Thomas Fuja

EE 48999 | Undergrad Research Experience
Thomas Fuja

This is a zero-credit course for students engaged in independent research or working with a faculty member or a member of the University staff on a special project. No course work is required.

  • Electrical Engineering
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1764
  • 0 of 200 enrolled
  • ,

Hai Lin

EE 67001 | Special Studies
Hai Lin

Individual or small-group study under the direction of a faculty member in a graduate subject not currently covered by any University course.

  • Electrical Engineering
  • 1.012.0 credits    CRN 1765
  • 2 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Panos Antsaklis

EE 67001 | Special Studies
Panos Antsaklis

Individual or small-group study under the direction of a faculty member in a graduate subject not currently covered by any University course.

  • Electrical Engineering
  • 1.012.0 credits    CRN 1766
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Bertrand Hochwald

EE 67001 | Special Studies
Bertrand Hochwald

Individual or small-group study under the direction of a faculty member in a graduate subject not currently covered by any University course.

  • Electrical Engineering
  • 1.012.0 credits    CRN 1767
  • 1 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Gary Bernstein

EE 67001 | Special Studies
Gary Bernstein

Individual or small-group study under the direction of a faculty member in a graduate subject not currently covered by any University course.

  • Electrical Engineering
  • 1.012.0 credits    CRN 1768
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

J. Nicholas Laneman

EE 67001 | Special Studies
J. Nicholas Laneman

Individual or small-group study under the direction of a faculty member in a graduate subject not currently covered by any University course.

  • Electrical Engineering
  • 1.012.0 credits    CRN 1769
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Martin Haenggi

EE 67001 | Special Studies
Martin Haenggi

Individual or small-group study under the direction of a faculty member in a graduate subject not currently covered by any University course.

  • Electrical Engineering
  • 1.012.0 credits    CRN 1770
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Douglas Hall

EE 67001 | Special Studies
Douglas Hall

Individual or small-group study under the direction of a faculty member in a graduate subject not currently covered by any University course.

  • Electrical Engineering
  • 1.012.0 credits    CRN 1771
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Ken Sauer

EE 67001 | Special Studies
Ken Sauer

Individual or small-group study under the direction of a faculty member in a graduate subject not currently covered by any University course.

  • Electrical Engineering
  • 1.012.0 credits    CRN 1772
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Patrick Fay

EE 67001 | Special Studies
Patrick Fay

Individual or small-group study under the direction of a faculty member in a graduate subject not currently covered by any University course.

  • Electrical Engineering
  • 1.012.0 credits    CRN 1773
  • 2 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Alexei Orlov

EE 67001 | Special Studies
Alexei Orlov

Individual or small-group study under the direction of a faculty member in a graduate subject not currently covered by any University course.

  • Electrical Engineering
  • 1.012.0 credits    CRN 1774
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Yih-Fang Huang

EE 67001 | Special Studies
Yih-Fang Huang

Individual or small-group study under the direction of a faculty member in a graduate subject not currently covered by any University course.

  • Electrical Engineering
  • 1.012.0 credits    CRN 1775
  • 0 of 75 enrolled
  • ,

Michael Lemmon

EE 67001 | Special Studies
Michael Lemmon

Individual or small-group study under the direction of a faculty member in a graduate subject not currently covered by any University course.

  • Electrical Engineering
  • 1.012.0 credits    CRN 1776
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Craig Lent

EE 67001 | Special Studies
Craig Lent

Individual or small-group study under the direction of a faculty member in a graduate subject not currently covered by any University course.

  • Electrical Engineering
  • 1.012.0 credits    CRN 1777
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Alan Seabaugh

EE 67001 | Special Studies
Alan Seabaugh

Individual or small-group study under the direction of a faculty member in a graduate subject not currently covered by any University course.

  • Electrical Engineering
  • 1.012.0 credits    CRN 1778
  • 1 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Thomas Fuja

EE 67001 | Special Studies
Thomas Fuja

Individual or small-group study under the direction of a faculty member in a graduate subject not currently covered by any University course.

  • Electrical Engineering
  • 1.012.0 credits    CRN 1779
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Lei Liu

EE 67001 | Special Studies
Lei Liu

Individual or small-group study under the direction of a faculty member in a graduate subject not currently covered by any University course.

  • Electrical Engineering
  • 1.012.0 credits    CRN 1780
  • 1 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Wolfgang Porod

EE 67001 | Special Studies
Wolfgang Porod

Individual or small-group study under the direction of a faculty member in a graduate subject not currently covered by any University course.

  • Electrical Engineering
  • 1.012.0 credits    CRN 1781
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Scott Howard

EE 67001 | Special Studies
Scott Howard

Individual or small-group study under the direction of a faculty member in a graduate subject not currently covered by any University course.

  • Electrical Engineering
  • 1.012.0 credits    CRN 1782
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Gregory Snider

EE 67001 | Special Studies
Gregory Snider

Individual or small-group study under the direction of a faculty member in a graduate subject not currently covered by any University course.

  • Electrical Engineering
  • 1.012.0 credits    CRN 1783
  • 2 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Christopher Hinkle

EE 67001 | Special Studies
Christopher Hinkle

Individual or small-group study under the direction of a faculty member in a graduate subject not currently covered by any University course.

  • Electrical Engineering
  • 1.012.0 credits    CRN 1784
  • 2 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Robert Stevenson

EE 67001 | Special Studies
Robert Stevenson

Individual or small-group study under the direction of a faculty member in a graduate subject not currently covered by any University course.

  • Electrical Engineering
  • 1.012.0 credits    CRN 1785
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Vijay Gupta

EE 67001 | Special Studies
Vijay Gupta

Individual or small-group study under the direction of a faculty member in a graduate subject not currently covered by any University course.

  • Electrical Engineering
  • 1.012.0 credits    CRN 1786
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Thomas Pratt

EE 67001 | Special Studies
Thomas Pratt

Individual or small-group study under the direction of a faculty member in a graduate subject not currently covered by any University course.

  • Electrical Engineering
  • 1.012.0 credits    CRN 1787
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Anthony Hoffman

EE 67001 | Special Studies
Anthony Hoffman

Individual or small-group study under the direction of a faculty member in a graduate subject not currently covered by any University course.

  • Electrical Engineering
  • 1.012.0 credits    CRN 1788
  • 2 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

David Burghoff

EE 67001 | Special Studies
David Burghoff

Individual or small-group study under the direction of a faculty member in a graduate subject not currently covered by any University course.

  • Electrical Engineering
  • 1.012.0 credits    CRN 1789
  • 3 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Jonathan Chisum

EE 67001 | Special Studies
Jonathan Chisum

Individual or small-group study under the direction of a faculty member in a graduate subject not currently covered by any University course.

  • Electrical Engineering
  • 1.012.0 credits    CRN 1790
  • 2 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Thomas O'Sullivan

EE 67001 | Special Studies
Thomas O'Sullivan

Individual or small-group study under the direction of a faculty member in a graduate subject not currently covered by any University course.

  • Electrical Engineering
  • 1.012.0 credits    CRN 1791
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Suman Datta

EE 67001 | Special Studies
Suman Datta

Individual or small-group study under the direction of a faculty member in a graduate subject not currently covered by any University course.

  • Electrical Engineering
  • 1.012.0 credits    CRN 1792
  • 2 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Maureen Collins

EE 67890 | Independent Summer Research
Maureen Collins

This course is for graduate students receiving a summer stipend and conducting independent research. Registering for this course will ensure proper classification for tax purposes. Only those students both actively engaged in research and receiving a stipend are eligible for this course.

  • Electrical Engineering
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1793
  • 74 of 400 enrolled
  • ,

Panos Antsaklis

EE 88699 | Research and Dissertation
Panos Antsaklis

Research and dissertation for resident doctoral students.

  • Electrical Engineering
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1796
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Peter Bauer

EE 88699 | Research and Dissertation
Peter Bauer

Research and dissertation for resident doctoral students.

  • Electrical Engineering
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1797
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Gary Bernstein

EE 88699 | Research and Dissertation
Gary Bernstein

Research and dissertation for resident doctoral students.

  • Electrical Engineering
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1798
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Martin Haenggi

EE 88699 | Research and Dissertation
Martin Haenggi

Research and dissertation for resident doctoral students.

  • Electrical Engineering
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1799
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Douglas Hall

EE 88699 | Research and Dissertation
Douglas Hall

Research and dissertation for resident doctoral students.

  • Electrical Engineering
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1800
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Yih-Fang Huang

EE 88699 | Research and Dissertation
Yih-Fang Huang

Research and dissertation for resident doctoral students.

  • Electrical Engineering
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1801
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Patrick Fay

EE 88699 | Research and Dissertation
Patrick Fay

Research and dissertation for resident doctoral students.

  • Electrical Engineering
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1802
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Bertrand Hochwald

EE 88699 | Research and Dissertation
Bertrand Hochwald

Research and dissertation for resident doctoral students.

  • Electrical Engineering
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1803
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Michael Lemmon

EE 88699 | Research and Dissertation
Michael Lemmon

Research and dissertation for resident doctoral students.

  • Electrical Engineering
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1804
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Craig Lent

EE 88699 | Research and Dissertation
Craig Lent

Research and dissertation for resident doctoral students.

  • Electrical Engineering
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1805
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Alan Seabaugh

EE 88699 | Research and Dissertation
Alan Seabaugh

Research and dissertation for resident doctoral students.

  • Electrical Engineering
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1806
  • 1 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Thomas Pratt

EE 88699 | Research and Dissertation
Thomas Pratt

Research and dissertation for resident doctoral students.

  • Electrical Engineering
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1807
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Thomas Fuja

EE 88699 | Research and Dissertation
Thomas Fuja

Research and dissertation for resident doctoral students.

  • Electrical Engineering
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1808
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Wolfgang Porod

EE 88699 | Research and Dissertation
Wolfgang Porod

Research and dissertation for resident doctoral students.

  • Electrical Engineering
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1809
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Gregory Snider

EE 88699 | Research and Dissertation
Gregory Snider

Research and dissertation for resident doctoral students.

  • Electrical Engineering
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1811
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

J. Nicholas Laneman

EE 88699 | Research and Dissertation
J. Nicholas Laneman

Research and dissertation for resident doctoral students.

  • Electrical Engineering
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1812
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Robert Stevenson

EE 88699 | Research and Dissertation
Robert Stevenson

Research and dissertation for resident doctoral students.

  • Electrical Engineering
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1813
  • 1 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Vijay Gupta

EE 88699 | Research and Dissertation
Vijay Gupta

Research and dissertation for resident doctoral students.

  • Electrical Engineering
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1814
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Anthony Hoffman

EE 88699 | Research and Dissertation
Anthony Hoffman

Research and dissertation for resident doctoral students.

  • Electrical Engineering
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1815
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Scott Howard

EE 88699 | Research and Dissertation
Scott Howard

Research and dissertation for resident doctoral students.

  • Electrical Engineering
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1816
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Hai Lin

EE 88699 | Research and Dissertation
Hai Lin

Research and dissertation for resident doctoral students.

  • Electrical Engineering
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1817
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Lei Liu

EE 88699 | Research and Dissertation
Lei Liu

Research and dissertation for resident doctoral students.

  • Electrical Engineering
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1818
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Jonathan Chisum

EE 88699 | Research and Dissertation
Jonathan Chisum

Research and dissertation for resident doctoral students.

  • Electrical Engineering
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1819
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Thomas O'Sullivan

EE 88699 | Research and Dissertation
Thomas O'Sullivan

Research and dissertation for resident doctoral students.

  • Electrical Engineering
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1820
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Suman Datta

EE 88699 | Research and Dissertation
Suman Datta

Research and dissertation for resident doctoral students.

  • Electrical Engineering
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1821
  • 0 of 12 enrolled
  • ,

Gregory Snider

EE 88700 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch
Gregory Snider

Required of nonresident doctoral students who are completing their dissertations in absentia and who wish to retain their degree status.

  • Electrical Engineering
  • 0.09.0 credits    CRN 1794
  • 6 of 15 enrolled
  • ,

Ramzi Bualuan

EG 00100 | Introduction to Engineering
Ramzi Bualuan

A noncredit course for high school students who have completed the junior year. A survey of the courses of study and career paths in aerospace, chemical, civil, computer, electrical, and mechanical engineering. An introduction to problem solving and computer programming through group projects. Trips to tour local and nearby industries, as examples of various engineering environments, are included. Offered in the first half of the summer session.

  • Engineering (Non-Departmental)
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1486
  • 95 of 100 enrolled
  • MTWRF 09:00 AM-04:00 PM 06/21 - 07/02
  • OLF,

Ramzi Bualuan

EG 00155 | IEP Counselors
Ramzi Bualuan

Introduction to Engineering summer program for High School Juniors.

  • Engineering (Non-Departmental)
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1490
  • 5 of 12 enrolled
  • ,

John Goodwine, Michael Kitz, Todd Taylor

EG 34440 | Probability & Statistics
John Goodwine, Michael Kitz, Todd Taylor

An introduction to the theory of probability and statistics with a focus on engineering principles. Topics include discrete and continuous random variables, joint probability distributions, the central limit theorem, point and interval estimation and hypothesis testing. In collaboration with Notre Dame's Global Gateways, there will also be an international component integrated throughout the course to provide additional historical and cultural perspectives to the course. <br><br> <b>A $50 program fee will be added to the cost of the course.<br><br>

  • Engineering (Non-Departmental)
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1723
  • 23 of 60 enrolled
  • MWR 11:00 AM-01:00 PM 06/02 - 07/15
  • OLF,ZODO,

Shreya Kumar, Michael Kitz, Todd Taylor

EG 44175 | Ethical/Professional Issues
Shreya Kumar, Michael Kitz, Todd Taylor

This course seeks to develop a solid foundation for reasoning about the difficult ethical, professional, and social controversies that arise in the engineering field. Emphasis is placed on identifying the appropriate legal and professional context and applying sound critical thinking skills to a problem. Topics covered include relevant professional codes of ethics, encryption/privacy/surveillance, freedom of speech, "cracking" of computer systems, development of safety-critical software, whistle blowing, and intellectual property. This course relies heavily on case studies of real incidents, both historical and current. In collaboration with Notre Dame's Global Gateways, there will also be an international component integrated throughout the course to provide additional historical and cultural perspectives to the course. <br><br> <b>A $50 program fee will be added to the cost of the course. <br><br>

  • Engineering (Non-Departmental)
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1721
  • 19 of 60 enrolled
  • MWR 01:30 PM-03:30 PM 06/02 - 07/15
  • OLF,ZODO,

Michael Kitz, Todd Taylor

EG 44421 | Intgrtd Eng & Bus Fundamntls
Michael Kitz, Todd Taylor

The course is designed to improve the effectiveness of engineers working in corporations by teaching how and why businesses operate. Subjects covered include business financial reporting, business plans, the product development processes, project management, supply chain and quality topics. In collaboration with Notre Dame's Global Gateways, there will also be an international component integrated throughout the course to provide additional historical and cultural perspectives to the course. <br><br> <b>A $50 program fee will be added to the cost of the course. <br><br>

  • Engineering (Non-Departmental)
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1722
  • 22 of 60 enrolled
  • MWR 04:00 PM-06:00 PM 06/02 - 07/15
  • OLF,ZODO,

Charles Hurley

EG 48999 | Research Experience Undergrad
Charles Hurley

This is a zero-credit, ungraded course for students engaged in independent research or working with a faculty member or a member of the University staff on a special project. Registration requires a brief description of the research or project to be pursued and the permission of the director of the Summer Session. This course is taken as an indication of the student's status on campus and is meant to allow the registered student to use the University facilities as the Summer Session permits. No course work is required.

  • Engineering (Non-Departmental)
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1605
  • 60 of 300 enrolled
  • ,

Holly Martin

ENGL 20235 | Introduction to Shakespeare
Holly Martin

This course introduces students to a wide variety of themes in Shakespeare's plays as well as to the plays' context and conventions. Particular emphasis will be placed on the plays' nature as scripts for the stage and, more recently, film. However the course will primarily focus on the difficulties of social interaction and self knowledge as seen in Shakespeare's use of plays-within-plays and of theatrical themes and language.

  • English
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1485
  • 17 of 19 enrolled
  • TWR 01:00 PM-03:05 PM 06/14 - 07/23
  • ZTST, LIT,WKLI

Bryan Santin

ENGL 24156 | Free Speech
Bryan Santin

This introductory course surveys the core texts, doctrines, ideas, and cultural controversies related to First Amendment protections for free expression. We will be especially interested in some large questions: what is expression? How have our ideas of freedom of expression evolved as we enter the digital age? What kind of expression should be permissible? What happens when the public forum is fully online? What is the relationship between free expression and democratic-self government? Is there a difference between individual, group, and government speech? How do we navigate alternative ways of thinking about free expression in a global media ecosystem? We will consider a selection of exemplary cases, controversies, and literary texts: among our topics will include the following: the transformation of speech in the age of digital media; libel, satire and parody; piracy, intellectual property and copyright; privacy and surveillance; hate speech and incitement; obscenity and pornography. We will investigate the topic by studying relevant case law, literary texts (including fiction, film and new media), political philosophy, and information policy? Disclaimer: you will encounter speech that is potentially offensive and discomforting in this course. <p> Note: this course is delivered fully online. The course design combines required live weekly meetings online with self-scheduled lectures, problems, assignments, and interactive learning materials. To participate, students will need to have a computer with webcam, reliable internet connection, and a quiet place to participate in live sessions.

  • English
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1292
  • 19 of 25 enrolled
  • MW 08:00 PM-09:30 PM 05/31 - 07/23
  • OLF,ZODO, LIT,WKLI

Hadas Elber-Aviram

ENGL 24492 | Deciphering the City
Hadas Elber-Aviram

This course studies the Urban Detective Story as a genre uniquely attuned to the crime, policing, challenges, temptations and also pleasures and epiphanies of the modern metropolis. It argues that the birth of the modern detective story coincided with, and responded to, the new predominance of urban life in the nineteenth century, nowhere more so than in London. While the roots of the detective story can be traced all the way back to Oedipus Rex, it is in Edgar Allan Poe's Auguste Dupin stories and Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes stories that the detective story becomes as much about deciphering the city as it is about unmasking the murderer. We will examine the affiliations, connections, and correspondences between the detective story and metropolitan life, with a special focus on London crime and London policing. Classes will focus on close readings of the set texts, with an emphasis on the study of literature in its historical, cultural, and material contexts. The course will argue that as the city increased in complexity, density, and vastness, so too it became proportionally less knowable, fathomable or graspable, and the more strenuous the efforts of the Urban Detective Story to "solve" it, applying rigorous logic and a set of assumptions regarding the rationality of human behaviour that were increasingly out of step with a deeply irrational world. Class discussions will likewise reconsider the often assumed equivalence between law and order and virtue, and between criminality, sin, and social transgression. We will reflect on the problematic role of the detective when society itself - or its esteemed representatives - transgresses against a higher moral law.

  • English
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1729
  • 13 of 15 enrolled
  • MW 10:00 AM-12:00 PM 05/31 - 07/23
  • MESE,OLF,ZODO, LIT,WKLI,WRIT

Lisa Caulfield

ENGL 34006 | Creative Writing in Ireland
Lisa Caulfield

This six-week online Creative Writing Seminar taught by playwright Marina Carr on behalf of the Kylemore Global Centre. The course will feature online creative writing instruction including lectures, discussions, workshoping and critiques of student's work. Students in this virtual setting will reflect upon peer?s fiction, poetry, scripts and/or hybrid writing. Themes that will be discussed will be ghosts, hearing voices, climate, landscape, and contemplation. Students will have the opportunity to engage with classical texts, Irish poets and authors in a virtual setting and workshop longer drafts and have readings in multiple genres will continue as we consider the role of the U.S./Irish writer in a global context. There will be the opportunity to attend virtual literary events, as well as virtual plays. Upon the completion of the course the student will have had the opportunity to work and develop their craft.

  • English
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1933
  • 4 of 20 enrolled
  • TWR 10:00 AM-12:00 PM 05/31 - 07/23
  • EN04,EN07,OLF,ZODO,ZOIK, FNAR,WKAR

Holly Martin

ENGL 40268 | Introduction to Shakespeare
Holly Martin

This course introduces students to a wide variety of themes in Shakespeare's plays as well as to the plays' context and conventions. Particular emphasis will be placed on the plays' nature as scripts for the stage and, more recently, film. However the course will primarily focus on the difficulties of social interaction and self knowledge as seen in Shakespeare's use of plays-within-plays and of theatrical themes and language.

  • English
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2026
  • 1 of 1 enrolled
  • TWR 01:00 PM-03:05 PM 06/14 - 07/23
  • ,

Maureen Collins

ENGL 67890 | Independent Summer Research
Maureen Collins

This course is for graduate students receiving a summer stipend and conducting independent research. Registering for this course will ensure proper classification for tax purposes. Only those students both actively engaged in research and receiving a stipend are eligible for this course.

  • English
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1034
  • 36 of 75 enrolled
  • ,

Lisa Caulfield

ENGL 94006 | Creative Writing in Ireland
Lisa Caulfield

This three-week immersive creative writing course will take place in Dublin and at Kylemore Abbey, Ireland. The course will feature creative writing instruction including discussion of published works, site-specific writing exercises and workshopping of student work lead by Notre Dame faculty Valerie Sayers and Joyelle McSweeeney. The course will also feature literary events as well as seminars and master classes led by visiting writers Alice McDermott and Kevin Barry. Students will also have time for their own writing and to explore the dynamic urbanism of Dublin and the stunning countryside surrounding Kylemore Abbey. Students of all levels and genres are invited to apply.

  • English
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 2005
  • 0 of 8 enrolled
  • TWR 10:00 AM-12:00 PM 06/14 - 07/23
  • ZOIK,ZOIS, FNAR,WKAR

Barry McCrea

ENGL 94513 | Irish Seminar
Barry McCrea

The IRISH Seminar 2021 invites graduate students to participate in a series of roundtable discussions, seminars, and public talks spanning a range of Irish Studies topics including: <br> <br> - The State of Irish History <br> - Irish Studies from austerity to pandemicm<br> - Black Ireland <br> - Irish Theatre & the Pandemic <br> - Life Writing <br> - Children's Literature in Ireland<br> - Beyond 2022: digital humanities & Irish Studies<br> <br> Faculty include Claire Bracken, Nessa Cronin, Michael Cronin, Enda Delaney, Anne Dolan, Eric Falci, Renee Fox, Korey Garibaldi, Patrick Griffin, Susan Cannon Harris, Carole Holohan, Declan Kiberd, Lynn Kigallon, Jarlath Killeen, Chante Mouton-Kinyon, Louise Lowe, Ian McBride, Barry McCrea, Tim Murtagh, Caitriona Ni Dhuill, Brian O Conchubhair, Nuala O'Connor, Maggie O'Neill, Emilie Pine, Annie Ryan, Colm Toibin, Sarah Townsend.<br> <br> Due to ongoing travel restrictions, the programme will take place in an online format inviting international faculty and participants to contribute via conference call. Notre Dame graduate students will have the opportunity to meet in person in line with Covid regulations on campus.

  • English
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1672
  • 2 of 8 enrolled
  • TBA 06/08 - 06/18
  • OLF,ZODO,ZOIR,ZOOX,

Azareen Van Der Vliet Oloomi

ENGL 95001 | Sparks Summer Internship
Azareen Van Der Vliet Oloomi

This is a one-credit internship for participation in completing a ten week Nicholas Sparks internship in book publishing. Students will be required to complete a short paper describing the internship experience and make a brief presentation.

  • English
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1734
  • 2 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Sara Maurer

ENGL 98601 | Research and Dissertation
Sara Maurer

Independent research and writing on an approved subject under the direction of a faculty member.

  • English
  • 0.09.0 credits    CRN 1035
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Elliott Visconsi

ENGL 98601 | Research and Dissertation
Elliott Visconsi

Independent research and writing on an approved subject under the direction of a faculty member.

  • English
  • 0.09.0 credits    CRN 1036
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Laura Walls

ENGL 98601 | Research and Dissertation
Laura Walls

Independent research and writing on an approved subject under the direction of a faculty member.

  • English
  • 0.09.0 credits    CRN 1037
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Kate Marshall

ENGL 98601 | Research and Dissertation
Kate Marshall

Independent research and writing on an approved subject under the direction of a faculty member.

  • English
  • 0.09.0 credits    CRN 1038
  • 1 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Jesse Lander

ENGL 98601 | Research and Dissertation
Jesse Lander

Independent research and writing on an approved subject under the direction of a faculty member.

  • English
  • 0.09.0 credits    CRN 1039
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Christopher Abram

ENGL 98601 | Research and Dissertation
Christopher Abram

Independent research and writing on an approved subject under the direction of a faculty member.

  • English
  • 0.09.0 credits    CRN 2047
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

ESTM 60229 | Entrepreneurial Work Mgmt.

The overall goal of this course is the development of skills and processes related to the management of one's professional life. This course is designed to introduce some basic principles, approaches, and tools related to planning and executing work-related projects. Topics include project planning, agile methodologies, personal professional development, and visual problem solving.

  • EG, SC & Tech Entrepreneurship
  • 0.5 credits    CRN 2042
  • 55 of 55 enrolled
  • M 10:00 AM-11:15 AM 07/12 - 07/12 |W 01:00 PM-02:15 PM 07/14 - 07/14 |M 10:00 AM-11:15 AM 07/19 - 07/19 |W 03:30 PM-04:45 PM 07/21 - 07/21 |W 12:30 PM-01:45 PM 07/21 - 07/21
  • ,

Ann-Marie Conrado

ESTM 61201 | Design Entrepreneurship
Ann-Marie Conrado

This process-based course introduces various techniques to communicate design intent. Topics covered include: rapid visualization, product development, user experience, works and looks-like prototyping, infographics and data-visualization, design narrative, photo and video editing, and process documentation. Through experience and tangible outcome, students will obtain a measurable shift in their understanding of product development, while improving presentation skills and aesthetic judgment. The goal of this course is not to turn ESTEEM students into designers, but to instruct them on the importance of design decisions to the product development process.

  • EG, SC & Tech Entrepreneurship
  • 1.5 credits    CRN 1593
  • 28 of 28 enrolled
  • F 08:30 AM-12:00 PM 06/25 - 07/23
  • ,

Ann-Marie Conrado

ESTM 61201 | Design Entrepreneurship
Ann-Marie Conrado

This process-based course introduces various techniques to communicate design intent. Topics covered include: rapid visualization, product development, user experience, works and looks-like prototyping, infographics and data-visualization, design narrative, photo and video editing, and process documentation. Through experience and tangible outcome, students will obtain a measurable shift in their understanding of product development, while improving presentation skills and aesthetic judgment. The goal of this course is not to turn ESTEEM students into designers, but to instruct them on the importance of design decisions to the product development process.

  • EG, SC & Tech Entrepreneurship
  • 1.5 credits    CRN 1592
  • 27 of 27 enrolled
  • F 01:00 PM-04:30 PM 06/25 - 07/23
  • ,

Dustin Mix

ESTM 63602 | Entrepreneurial Thinking
Dustin Mix

The Entrepreneurial Thinking Course introduces the concepts inherent within the Entrepreneurial Mindset. Emphasis will be on the complexity and scope of the challenges that entrepreneurs face, the critical decisions they make, and the actions they take. Additionally, students will explore the foundations of the Business Model Canvas as it relates to startup generation.

  • EG, SC & Tech Entrepreneurship
  • 1.5 credits    CRN 1590
  • 55 of 55 enrolled
  • MTWR 08:30 AM-11:40 AM 06/21 - 06/29
  • ZCSC,

Michael Meyer

ESTM 63606 | Entrepreneurial Accounting
Michael Meyer

The Entrepreneurial Accounting Course is focused upon the basic concepts and standards underlying financial accounting systems as they relate to entrepreneurship. Several important concepts will be studied in detail, including: revenue recognition, inventory, long-lived assets, present value, and long term liabilities. The course emphasizes the construction of the basic financial accounting statements: the income statement, balance sheet, and cash flow statement.

  • EG, SC & Tech Entrepreneurship
  • 1.5 credits    CRN 1591
  • 55 of 55 enrolled
  • TWR 08:30 AM-11:40 AM 07/13 - 07/15 |TWR 08:30 AM-11:40 AM 07/27 - 07/29
  • ,

Maureen Collins

ESTM 67890 | Independent Summer Research
Maureen Collins

This course is for graduate students receiving a summer stipend and conducting independent research. Registering for this course will ensure proper classification for tax purposes. Only those students both actively engaged in research and receiving a stipend are eligible for this course.

  • EG, SC & Tech Entrepreneurship
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 2008
  • 3 of 3 enrolled
  • ,

ESTM 68303 | ESTEEM Capstone Project

This course is the completion of the Thesis Project for the ESTEEM program. The end result is a thesis that describes in depth the intellectual property/technology embodied in the thesis project, applications, commercialization of the technology and culminating in a business plan.

  • EG, SC & Tech Entrepreneurship
  • 1.06.0 credits    CRN 1594
  • 55 of 55 enrolled
  • F 10:00 AM-12:00 PM 06/18 - 06/18 |R 03:00 PM-05:00 PM 07/01 - 07/29
  • ,

James Leady

FIN 24150 | Fundamentals of Finance
James Leady

This course is required for finance majors and a grade of "C" or higher is a prerequisite for continuing in the finance major. The course provides an in-depth and quantitative examination of the principles of financial decision-making. Students learn the concepts of value maximization, mathematics of finance, valuation of financial securities, capital investment evaluation, and the estimation of required rates of return. <p> Note: this course is delivered fully online. The course design combines required live weekly meetings online with self-scheduled lectures, problems, assignments, and interactive learning materials. To participate, students will need to have a computer with webcam, reliable internet connection, and a quiet place to participate in live sessions. <P>This course is required for finance majors and a grade of "C" or higher is a prerequisite for continuing in the finance major. The course provides an in-depth and quantitative examination of the principles of financial decision-making. Students learn the concept of value maximization, mathematics of finance, valuation of financial securities, capital investment evaluation, the estimation of required rates of return, and the theory of capital structure.

  • Finance
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1411
  • 29 of 48 enrolled
  • TR 06:00 PM-08:00 PM 05/31 - 07/15
  • BA02,OLF,ZODO,

John Stiver

FIN 30220 | Macroeconomic Analysis
John Stiver

The course addresses topics including the goals of economic policy, national income accounting, theory of income determination and the determination and behavior of economic aggregates, such as total output and the price level.

  • Finance
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1269
  • 19 of 23 enrolled
  • MW 12:30 PM-03:40 PM 06/14 - 07/23
  • BA03,

Kristen Collett-Schmitt

FIN 34211 | Managerial Economics
Kristen Collett-Schmitt

This course investigates the relationship between intermediate microeconomic theory and managerial practice. Course topics include analysis of supply and demand, optimization techniques, theories of production and cost, market structure, and strategy. Through a combination of real-world applications, interviews with industry experts, collaborative learning, innovative use of media, and guided practice, students enrolled in this course will strengthen skills required to manage the challenges of the modern business firm. <p> Note: this course is delivered fully online. The course design combines required live weekly meetings online with self-scheduled lectures, problems, assignments, and interactive learning materials. To participate, students will need to have a computer with webcam, reliable internet connection, and a quiet place to participate in live sessions.

  • Finance
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1412
  • 51 of 55 enrolled
  • TR 08:00 PM-09:55 PM 05/31 - 07/12
  • BA03,OLF,ZODO, SOSC,WKSS

D. Katherine Spiess

FIN 60500 | Finance
D. Katherine Spiess

Financial managers face three primary types of decisions: (1) what investment opportunities to undertake; (2) how to fund those investments; and (3) when and how to return cash to the firm's owners. This course will focus primarily on the first of these three decisions, developing strategies and techniques for determining whether a particular investment opportunity will create value for the firm. It also briefly explores alternative sources of financing and capital structure choice.

  • Finance
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 1604
  • 54 of 60 enrolled
  • MTWRF 09:00 AM-11:45 AM 06/28 - 07/09
  • ,

Theodore Mandell

FTT 30405 | Intro to Film & TV Production
Theodore Mandell

An introductory Summer course in the fundamentals of writing, shooting, editing, and lighting for narrative film and television productions. This is a summer hands-on course emphasizing creativity, aesthetic, and technical expertise. Students learn the many aspects of filmmaking while making short films of their own. Requirements: Three short digital video assignments, selected readings, and a final exam.

  • Film, Television, and Theatre
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1528
  • 6 of 12 enrolled
  • TR 12:45 PM-03:55 PM 06/14 - 07/23
  • ZNBL,

Anre Venter, Theodore Mandell

FTT 34635 | Drunk on Film:
Anre Venter, Theodore Mandell

Alcohol Use Disorder is a chronic relapsing brain disease. But when presented on screen, it's entertainment. Why do we laugh, why do we cry, why do we emulate fictional characters whose drinking habits result in a life of debilitating addiction? From James Bond to Jonah Hill, the psychology and seduction of alcohol on film, television, and online will be analyzed. Furthermore, what is the relationship between the manner in which alcohol use/abuse is presented on screen and the manner in which alcohol is used and abused on, for example, college campuses? Surveying recent film history, we will examine how alcohol is used in story structure, as a character flaw or strength, and as a narrative device in the story arc of films across multiple film genres, (action/adventure, comedy, romance, etc). Why do characters drink, where do they drink, and how does the result of their "getting drunk" advance the narrative? We'll also look at non-fiction films that tackle issues of addiction, as a way of comparing character development in Hollywood films to the results of this same behavior in everyday life. Film materials will include weekly screenings outside of class, and academic articles relating to portrayal and analysis of alcohol use in film and television, including the business of marketing alcohol in print and television advertising. From the psychological perspective we will discuss the topic and process of social influence and how the presence of others influences our behavior. Questions of interest will include the following: what are the mechanisms by which group influence unfolds? How and why might we be persuaded? Does the manner, and if so how, in which alcohol use is portrayed in movies and the media reflect the processes and principles of social influence? Readings will include chapters on social influence, persuasion and academic articles evaluating the manner in which alcohol is portrayed and advertised and the effect this has on alcohol consumption. In addition, issues of addiction will be discussed - from understanding the basis of addiction to examining the efficacy of addiction treatment.

  • Film, Television, and Theatre
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1601
  • 19 of 24 enrolled
  • MTW 04:00 PM-06:05 PM 06/14 - 07/23
  • OLF,ZODO, WKIN

Nathaniel Myers

FTT 44600 | Shakespeare and Film
Nathaniel Myers

This course explores the phenomenon of Shakespeare and film, concentrating on the ranges of meaning provoked by the conjunction. We shall be looking at examples of films of Shakespeare plays both early and recent, both in English and in other languages, and both ones that stick close to the conventionalized and historicized conceptualizations of Shakespeare and adaptations at varying degrees of distance toward the erasure of Shakespeare from the text. The transportation of different forms of Shakespearean textualities (printed, theatrical, filmic) and the confrontation with the specificities of film produce a cultural phenomenon whose cultural meanings - meanings as Shakespeare and meanings as film - will be the subject of our investigations. Students will be required to view screenings of films on a regular basis during the semester. <p> Note: this course is delivered fully online. The course design combines required live weekly meetings online with self-scheduled lectures, problems, assignments, and interactive learning materials. To participate, students will need to have a computer with webcam, reliable internet connection, and a quiet place to participate in live sessions.

  • Film, Television, and Theatre
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1293
  • 20 of 25 enrolled
  • TR 04:00 PM-05:30 PM 05/31 - 07/23
  • MESE,OLF,ZODO, FNAR,WKAR

Christine Becker

FTT 45999 | FTT Internship
Christine Becker

Students who successfully complete at least two of the following courses, FTT 30410, FTT 30462 or FTT 30463, may be eligible for an internship at a television station or network, radio station, video production company, film production company or similar media outlet. Interns must work 10-15 hours per week and compile 150 work hours by the end of the semester (120 hours for the summer session) to obtain three credits. Interns will complete a project, mid-semester progress report and a final evaluation paper. NOTE: This course does not count as an upper level course toward the FTT major.

  • Film, Television, and Theatre
  • 1.03.0 credits    CRN 1541
  • 6 of 35 enrolled
  • ZINT,

Theodore Mandell

FTT 50505 | Intro to Film & TV Production
Theodore Mandell

An introductory course in the fundamentals of writing, shooting, editing, and lighting for narrative film and video productions. This is a summer hands-on course emphasizing creativity, aesthetic, and technical expertise. Students learn the many aspects of filmmaking while making short films of their own using the new facilities in the Marie P. DeBartolo Performing Arts Center. Requirements: Three short digital video assignments, selected readings, and a final exam.

  • Film, Television, and Theatre
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1529
  • 1 of 1 enrolled
  • TR 12:45 PM-03:55 PM 06/14 - 07/23
  • ZNBL,

Theodore Mandell

FTT 60505 | Intro to Film & TV Production
Theodore Mandell

An introductory Summer course in the fundamentals of writing, shooting, editing, and lighting for narrative film and television productions. This is a summer hands-on course emphasizing creativity, aesthetic, and technical expertise. Students learn the many aspects of filmmaking while making short films of their own. Requirements: Three short digital video assignments, selected readings, and a final exam.

  • Film, Television, and Theatre
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1530
  • 1 of 1 enrolled
  • TR 12:45 PM-03:55 PM 06/14 - 07/23
  • ,

James Collins

FTT 70000 | Film Across the Humanities
James Collins

This Summer course is intended for <b>graduate students </b> who would like to incorporate films into their courses but have hesitated to do so because they have had little or no formal training in film studies. I have designed a week-long intensive course that will solve that problem by exposing seminar participants to the different pedagogical strategies they might use to incorporate films in their courses.We will begin with a crash-course in close visual analysis because I think that's the chief source of anxiety. So I've got this image up on the wall, what do I do with it? How do I get my students to be analytical about those images? Then we'll explore the various ways that really productive interdisciplinary study can be achieved through film analysis. How can we use films effectively to pursue aesthetic, political, philosophical, or theological issues? Most importantly, how can we talk about film as a "way of knowing" in what are increasingly visual cultures?During each morning session, I'll introduce a variety of approaches through lecture, scene analysis, and short selected readings. We'll have a screening each day, right after lunch, and then we'll discuss pragmatic utilization of those methods in our afternoon discussions of the film, focusing on specific applications in courses now being taught or in the process of being developed.Screenings and discussions in the Browning Cinema in the Performing Arts Center.

  • Film, Television, and Theatre
  • 0.03.0 credits    CRN 1617
  • 4 of 8 enrolled
  • MTWRF 09:00 AM-05:00 PM 05/31 - 06/04
  • ,

James Collins

FTT 70000 | Film Across the Humanities
James Collins

This Summer course is intended for <b>graduate students </b> who would like to incorporate films into their courses but have hesitated to do so because they have had little or no formal training in film studies. I have designed a week-long intensive course that will solve that problem by exposing seminar participants to the different pedagogical strategies they might use to incorporate films in their courses.We will begin with a crash-course in close visual analysis because I think that's the chief source of anxiety. So I've got this image up on the wall, what do I do with it? How do I get my students to be analytical about those images? Then we'll explore the various ways that really productive interdisciplinary study can be achieved through film analysis. How can we use films effectively to pursue aesthetic, political, philosophical, or theological issues? Most importantly, how can we talk about film as a "way of knowing" in what are increasingly visual cultures?During each morning session, I'll introduce a variety of approaches through lecture, scene analysis, and short selected readings. We'll have a screening each day, right after lunch, and then we'll discuss pragmatic utilization of those methods in our afternoon discussions of the film, focusing on specific applications in courses now being taught or in the process of being developed.Screenings and discussions in the Browning Cinema in the Performing Arts Center.

  • Film, Television, and Theatre
  • 0.03.0 credits    CRN 1618
  • 3 of 8 enrolled
  • MTWRF 09:00 AM-05:00 PM 05/31 - 06/04
  • ,

James Collins

FTT 70000 | Film Across the Humanities
James Collins

This Summer course is intended for <b>graduate students </b> who would like to incorporate films into their courses but have hesitated to do so because they have had little or no formal training in film studies. I have designed a week-long intensive course that will solve that problem by exposing seminar participants to the different pedagogical strategies they might use to incorporate films in their courses.We will begin with a crash-course in close visual analysis because I think that's the chief source of anxiety. So I've got this image up on the wall, what do I do with it? How do I get my students to be analytical about those images? Then we'll explore the various ways that really productive interdisciplinary study can be achieved through film analysis. How can we use films effectively to pursue aesthetic, political, philosophical, or theological issues? Most importantly, how can we talk about film as a "way of knowing" in what are increasingly visual cultures?During each morning session, I'll introduce a variety of approaches through lecture, scene analysis, and short selected readings. We'll have a screening each day, right after lunch, and then we'll discuss pragmatic utilization of those methods in our afternoon discussions of the film, focusing on specific applications in courses now being taught or in the process of being developed.Screenings and discussions in the Browning Cinema in the Performing Arts Center.

  • Film, Television, and Theatre
  • 0.03.0 credits    CRN 1647
  • 0 of 8 enrolled
  • MTWRF 09:00 AM-05:00 PM 06/07 - 06/11
  • ,

James Collins

FTT 70000 | Film Across the Humanities
James Collins

This Summer course is intended for <b>graduate students </b> who would like to incorporate films into their courses but have hesitated to do so because they have had little or no formal training in film studies. I have designed a week-long intensive course that will solve that problem by exposing seminar participants to the different pedagogical strategies they might use to incorporate films in their courses.We will begin with a crash-course in close visual analysis because I think that's the chief source of anxiety. So I've got this image up on the wall, what do I do with it? How do I get my students to be analytical about those images? Then we'll explore the various ways that really productive interdisciplinary study can be achieved through film analysis. How can we use films effectively to pursue aesthetic, political, philosophical, or theological issues? Most importantly, how can we talk about film as a "way of knowing" in what are increasingly visual cultures?During each morning session, I'll introduce a variety of approaches through lecture, scene analysis, and short selected readings. We'll have a screening each day, right after lunch, and then we'll discuss pragmatic utilization of those methods in our afternoon discussions of the film, focusing on specific applications in courses now being taught or in the process of being developed.Screenings and discussions in the Browning Cinema in the Performing Arts Center.

  • Film, Television, and Theatre
  • 0.03.0 credits    CRN 2056
  • 1 of 1 enrolled
  • MTWRF 09:00 AM-05:00 PM 06/07 - 06/11
  • ,

Cecilia Lucero, ChongKeat Arthur Lim, Daniel Graff, Kasey Swanke, Kathleen Sullivan, Kelley Young, Marisha Schmidt, Matthew Capdevielle, Shreya Kumar

FYS 10001 | Balfour Program
Cecilia Lucero, ChongKeat Arthur Lim, Daniel Graff, Kasey Swanke, Kathleen Sullivan, Kelley Young, Marisha Schmidt, Matthew Capdevielle, Shreya Kumar

The Balfour-Hesburgh Scholars Program is designed to help students make a successful initial transition from high school to university-level academic work and campus life. The centerpiece of the Program is a summer academic experience, during which students who have been accepted into Notre Dame spend four weeks taking introductory, college-level courses in composition, calculus, computer programming, chemistry, and history, as well as leadership and well-being. Students learn to identify and apply appropriate learning strategies to maximize their performance in courses. They learn to navigate the physical campus and various academic and social resources, and meet faculty who introduce them to diverse disciplines and research. The Program also helps students to establish peer-group support, upon which they can rely during the academic year. Permission is required to register for the Program.

  • First Year of Studies
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 2039
  • 23 of 23 enrolled
  • MTWRF 08:30 AM-04:00 PM 06/14 - 07/23
  • ,

Nicholas Mainieri

FYS 10421 | Promoting Academic Resilience
Nicholas Mainieri

Academic Resilience relates to a student's ability to maintain high levels of motivation and performance in the midst of stressful and challenging situations. This course would address four specific areas: 1. Self-Efficacy: Developing students' belief in their own ability to organize and execute necessary tasks. Providing support on academic skills that promote success including time management, strategic reading, note taking, and exam preparation. 2. Understanding Individual Motivation and Challenges: helping students to articulate their reasons for college attendance and the individual challenges they face in navigating their college experience. 3. Developing Positive Habits: Identifying areas where habits can be developed or improved to promote success. Creating a specific and actionable plan for development. Identifying skills for responding to failure. 4. Understanding and Accessing a Network of Support: Connecting students to individuals and departments that can support their success. Breaking down initial barriers to accessing these resources through individual connections.

  • First Year of Studies
  • 0.51.0 credits    CRN 1984
  • 43 of 50 enrolled
  • F 12:45 PM-01:45 PM 06/14 - 07/23
  • ,

Christopher Miller

GE 64501 | German Graduate Reading
Christopher Miller

Intended as review for graduate students who wish to take the GRE in German. The final examination of the course, if passed, fulfills the requirements of the GRE.

  • German
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1561
  • 25 of 30 enrolled
  • MTWR 01:00 PM-02:30 PM 06/14 - 07/23
  • OLF,ZODO,

Heidi Beidinger, Jenna Coalson

GH 68552 | Capstone Field Research
Heidi Beidinger, Jenna Coalson

Students will develop a Master's Project topic in consultation with their Faculty Adviser and the Director of Global Health Studies and undertake research and writing. The Faculty Adviser and Director of Global Health Studies will establish a time-line and expected deliverables for each semester that are consistent with students' completing their projects in a timely manner. Students will submit and present their Project to an evaluation committee. MS in Global Health students; will need to take 4 credit hours over the course of the year.

  • Global Health - Eck Institute
  • 6.0 credits    CRN 1620
  • 9 of 12 enrolled
  • ,

Philippe Collon

GRED 60601 | Acad Career in Phys/Math/Engnr
Philippe Collon

This course will cover major issues in teaching and career development for students in science, mathematics, and engineering. Topics to be discussed include: (1) Preparing for an academic career (2) Finding academic employment (3) How academia works: postdocs, networking, publishing, and tenure (4) Teaching science, mathematics, and engineering at a university (5) Course and syllabus design (6) How to engage students in the classroom (7) How to gauge student learning (8) Balancing teaching and research Students will be expected to give a short presentation on a topic of their choice within their own disciplines.

  • Graduate Education
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1677
  • 11 of 15 enrolled
  • TWRF 09:00 AM-12:00 PM 07/13 - 07/16
  • ,

Jason Ruiz

GRED 60610 | Acad Career in Hum & Soc Sci
Jason Ruiz

There are a number of issues relating to the culture of academic life that are typically left unaddressed in formal course work and degree programs, but which are of concern for those who plan to spend their careers in academic life. This course introduces doctoral students, especially those in the humanities and social sciences, to a number of these in an effort to promote professional development. This course is built around four major areas: (1) Academic positions and expectations (2) Teaching and teaching skills (3) Research (4) Service We will explore a wide range of topics for each of these areas, including the preparation of a C.V., an explanation of the tenure process, syllabus construction, the use of technology in teaching, setting up a research agenda, participation in professional societies, external grants, citizenship in the university and society, and principles for a successful career. This course emphasizes the practical requirements of the professor. It is designed for those on the job market, but is open to any who want to learn about the requirements of academia.

  • Graduate Education
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1678
  • 6 of 14 enrolled
  • MTWRF 01:00 PM-04:00 PM 05/24 - 05/28
  • ,

David Hyde

GRED 60640 | Tchng 1st Biol or Chem Course
David Hyde

This course is for continuing graduate students, primarily in Biology and Chemistry, who want to improve their effectiveness in teaching in the science classroom and laboratory. It is also intended as a preparation for those graduate students who intend to have a significant teaching component in their future career. Topics covered will include: ? Steps in progressing from being a graduate student to a faculty member ? What is expected when you start a new faculty position ? Developing the fundamental tools for your first class: outline, syllabus, course materials ? Learning to deliver clear and engaging lectures ? Fostering critical thinking and problem solving skills ? Incorporating collaborative learning ? Using technology well ? Standard, flipped, hybrid and online courses ? Assessments: what it means for the student and the instructor ? Designing a laboratory course and the appropriate experiments Students will be asked to actively participate in the course through discussions, designing and delivering short lectures, and short writing assignments. This course is required for the completion of the Teaching Development Certification Program in Biological Sciences

  • Graduate Education
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 1679
  • 6 of 15 enrolled
  • MTWR 09:00 AM-05:00 PM 05/24 - 05/27
  • ,

John Lubker

GRED 60802 | Leadership & Social Engagement
John Lubker

Leadership Advancing Socially Engaged Research is for selected students only.

  • Graduate Education
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1849
  • 16 of 20 enrolled
  • TBA 06/14 - 07/23
  • OLF,

Kristin Rudenga

GRED 64010 | Academic Career Preparation
Kristin Rudenga

In this practical, discussion-based course, students will develop skills and perspectives for applying to, interviewing for, and navigating within academic jobs. Students will reflect on their experiences, strengths, and goals; develop and receive feedback on their application documents; learn and practice interview skills; and discuss how to succeed in academic life. Students who complete the course will be better prepared for the academic job market as well as for the challenges and opportunities of higher education careers.

  • Graduate Education
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 1686
  • 7 of 20 enrolled
  • TR 09:30 AM-11:15 AM 05/31 - 07/23
  • OLF,ZODO,

Alexandra Oxner

GRED 64011 | Inclusive Teaching
Alexandra Oxner

In the wake of the 2020 election, recent racial justice protests, and politicization of language surrounding COVID-19, it is critical for instructors to design intentional and inclusive learning environments in order to support a diverse range of students. In this introduction to inclusive pedagogy and social justice-oriented curricula, we will read current research on the state of higher education. More importantly, we will develop practical strategies for fostering community within the classroom, exploring intersectional student identities, diversifying course content, and more. It is my hope that you will leave the class with the ability to articulate your own goals for inclusive teaching and learning. You'll also create documents that can be used in future classrooms and on the job market for teaching-related positions.

  • Graduate Education
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1687
  • 13 of 20 enrolled
  • TR 11:00 AM-12:30 PM 06/14 - 07/02
  • OLF,ZODO,

Michelle Marvin

GRED 64014 | Scientific Writing
Michelle Marvin

This course offers graduate students in the sciences and engineering a focused study of the conventions of scientific writing, fostering a clearer understanding of what constitutes good writing in these fields. Through close analysis of published scientific papers, guest lectures from faculty in the sciences and engineering, and focused writing activities in a workshop environment, students will hone their writing skills and make a clear plan for their continued development as writers in their home disciplines.

  • Graduate Education
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 1690
  • 21 of 22 enrolled
  • T 01:00 PM-02:30 PM 05/31 - 07/23
  • OLF,ZODO,

Michelle Marvin

GRED 64015 | STEM Communication-Oral Pres
Michelle Marvin

Effective communication is an essential skill for success in scientific, engineering, and technical careers. In this course, graduate students from the STEM fields will develop their ability to communicate clearly and engagingly with multiple audiences, from peers and professors to potential employers, journalists, and family members. Drawing upon the latest science communication research, this course will help graduate students increase their comfort level and proficiency in orally presenting scientific research. By working through elevator pitches, lightning talks, poster presentations, conference presentations, and job talks, students will increase their competence as scientific communicators and hone their skills for future presentations.

  • Graduate Education
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1691
  • 18 of 20 enrolled
  • R 01:00 PM-02:30 PM 05/31 - 07/23
  • OLF,ZODO,

Matthew Capdevielle

GRED 64016 | Article Accelerator
Matthew Capdevielle

The summer session Article Accelerator is an 8-week course designed to help graduate students and postdocs make consistent progress toward revising an existing piece of writing, such as a conference paper, seminar paper, or dissertation chapter, into an article manuscript ready to be submitted to a journal. Students will be assigned reading from Wendy Laura Belcher's book Writing Your Journal Article in Twelve Weeks and meet weekly to discuss the reading, check in with peers on progress and productivity, and participate in peer-editing exercises designed to model good article-preparation practices alongside Belcher's recommendations.

  • Graduate Education
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 1692
  • 11 of 20 enrolled
  • TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM 05/31 - 07/23
  • OLF,ZODO,

Pamela Butler

GSC 35000 | Internship
Pamela Butler

This course connects students with a community-based partner organization related to the student's interests in career development and social justice. In collaboration with the Director of Undergraduate Studies, students choose a community partner organization for which they serve as an unpaid intern. In fall/spring semesters, students perform 6-8 hours of internship service per week for their chosen internship site, completing a minimum of 80 total hours. During summer session, students work 5-8 weeks full time, as defined by the internship site. Work on-site is overseen by a designated agency supervisor; coursework is supervised and evaluated by the Director of Undergraduate Studies. Students are expected to complete a short set of readings before the internship begins. Additional assignments include: weekly journal entries; a final reflection paper that summarizes the internship experience and explores its connections to the student's Gender Studies education; an updated resume that includes the internship. This course may be taken during any of the three academic sessions in junior or senior year, and may be counted as an elective towards any Gender Studies undergraduate degree.

  • Gender Studies
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1001
  • 1 of 4 enrolled
  • ZINT,

Daniel Hobbins

HIST 30267 | The Middle Ages on Film
Daniel Hobbins

This course will explore modern popular imaginings of the Middle Ages through film. We will view several feature-length films and numerous clips, interspersed with readings from and about the Middle Ages. Together we will discuss and analyze both the texts and films. The films will range from early silent films to Monty Python spoofs to recent blockbusters. I have divided the course into six segments: (1) the Crusades; (2) Eleanor of Aquitaine: wife and mother of kings; (3) Robin Hood; (4) King Arthur; (5) the Black Death; and (6) Joan of Arc Students will write short daily assignments, two short essays, and a final paper or take-home exam. There are two required textbooks and a course packet. The textbooks are Robert Brent Toplin, Reel History: In Defense of Hollywood (2002); and Daniel Hobbins (trans.), The Trial of Joan of Arc.

  • History
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1542
  • 12 of 18 enrolled
  • MTWR 10:30 AM-12:05 PM 06/14 - 07/23
  • HBEU,HCT2,HPRE,HTME, HIST,WKHI

Ian Johnson

HIST 30995 | The Road to War
Ian Johnson

This course will explore the origins of the Second World War from 1919 to 1941. Students will engage in the major historiographical debates on the origins of the war, including the Treaty of Versailles, the rise of Hitler, the militarization of Japan, and the question of appeasement. Students will gain an appreciation of the complex interwar political and social environment while wrestling with questions of causation, structure and agency in history.

  • History
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1544
  • 8 of 19 enrolled
  • MWF 10:30 AM-12:35 PM 06/14 - 07/23
  • HCT6, HIST,WKHI

Avrum Burg

HIST 34073 | Who Are You Israel?
Avrum Burg

There are not many individuals in the world, who do not know Israel. Who did not hear something, good or bad, about it? Many have strong opinions about what is happening in this small country. During the term the students will be introduce to two axes content in an attempt to have a better understanding of this the turbulent. One - the chronological framework, of the Jewish people in general and the Israeli society in particular. The review will be general about distant history and become more detailed and conceptual the closer we get to the present time and the contemporary reality. Two - examine the content, stressing existential issues and ideological positions that guide this society or tear it from within. It will offer an overview on the political ideologies that drive the Israeli public systems. And finally, it should conclude by trying to understand the Israeli strategy.

  • History
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1742
  • 8 of 25 enrolled
  • TWR 09:00 AM-11:00 AM 05/31 - 07/09
  • HCT6,OLF,ZODO, HIST,WKHI

Anthony Keen

HIST 34236 | Roman Britain
Anthony Keen

This three credit class has been designed to allow students to investigate the impact of the Roman Empire on Britain from 55BC to 406AD, and how this influence is still prevalent today. Through the discussion of both archaeological and textual sources, an understanding of what life was like in Roman occupied Britannia will be obtained. We will engage with a number of related topics, which include the changes in daily life for Britons under Roman rule, the creation of new towns, the development of technology and the role of religion. A key part of this course will be a number of site visits to put into context what can be gleaned from the textual and visual source material taught in class. These experiences will also showcase how contemporary Britain engages with its past, and the variety of methods that are employed to aid the preservation of this period of history.

  • History
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1848
  • 5 of 15 enrolled
  • TR 05:00 PM-07:00 PM 05/31 - 07/23
  • HCT2,HPRE,MESE,OLF,ZODO,ZOLA,ZOLS, HIST,WKHI

Kevin Whelan

HIST 34430 | Introduction to Ireland
Kevin Whelan

ND Keough Ctr Course: Prof. Kevin Whelan. Evolution of Irish culture from the eighteenth century to the contemporary period; It aims to give students a foundational understanding of the cultural inheritance of the island. While organized in broadly chronological terms, it will also examine crucial thematic concerns -- landscape, history, languages, economy, society, politics and government, literature, music, sport.

  • History
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1732
  • 16 of 25 enrolled
  • MTW 12:00 PM-01:30 PM 05/31 - 07/08
  • HCT3,IBCL,MESE,OLF,ZCSC,ZODO,ZODU,ZOIR,ZOIS,ZOIT, HIST,SOSC,WKHI,WKSS,WRIT

Kevin Whelan

HIST 34430 | Introduction to Ireland
Kevin Whelan

ND Keough Ctr Course: Prof. Kevin Whelan. Evolution of Irish culture from the eighteenth century to the contemporary period; It aims to give students a foundational understanding of the cultural inheritance of the island. While organized in broadly chronological terms, it will also examine crucial thematic concerns -- landscape, history, languages, economy, society, politics and government, literature, music, sport.

  • History
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2057
  • 1 of 1 enrolled
  • MTW 12:00 PM-01:30 PM 05/31 - 07/08
  • HCT3,IBCL,MESE,OLF,ZCSC,ZODO,ZODU,ZOIR,ZOIS,ZOIT, HIST,SOSC,WKHI,WKSS,WRIT

Chiara Sbordoni

HIST 34502 | All Roads Lead to Rome
Chiara Sbordoni

Is it possible to understand the immense phenomenon of Rome in a semester of site visits, historical studies, literary readings, film viewings and lectures? Of course not. Nevertheless, students in this course will start to understand Rome by experiencing the complexity of its urban network; by studying the ruins of antiquity and the splendors of Renaissance, Baroque and 18th Century Rome; by tracing the epic adventure that reunited Italy and led to the establishment of Rome as its capital after twenty centuries (so that today, Rome is at the heart of two states: the Italian Republic and of Vatican); by revisiting the tragedies of modern times, including fascism and the civil war; and by learning about the Rome of postwar and contemporary Italy.

  • History
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1701
  • 7 of 8 enrolled
  • TR 10:00 AM-11:30 AM 05/31 - 07/23
  • HCT2,HCT3,HPRE,IBCL,MESE,OLF,ZCSC,ZODO, FNAR,HIST,LIT,WKAR,WKHI,WKLI

Maureen Collins

HIST 67890 | Independent Summer Research
Maureen Collins

This course is for graduate students receiving a summer stipend and conducting independent research. Registering for this course will ensure proper classification for tax purposes. Only those students both actively engaged in research and receiving a stipend are eligible for this course.

  • History
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1858
  • 36 of 100 enrolled
  • ,

Darren Dochuk

HIST 98201 | Summer Diss. Completion
Darren Dochuk

This course fulfills registration requirements for Summer Session degree completion.

  • History
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1859
  • 3 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Maureen Collins

HPS 67890 | Independent Summer Research
Maureen Collins

This course is for graduate students receiving a summer stipend and conducting independent research. Registering for this course will ensure proper classification for tax purposes. Only those students both actively engaged in research and receiving a stipend are eligible for this course.

  • History and Phil. of Science
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1931
  • 11 of 15 enrolled
  • ,

Robert Goulding

HPS 98699 | Research and Dissertation
Robert Goulding

Independent research and writing on an approved subject under the direction of a faculty member.

  • History and Phil. of Science
  • 0.012.0 credits    CRN 1932
  • 1 of 15 enrolled
  • ,

IBMS 67890 | Independent Summer Research

This course is for graduate students receiving a summer stipend and conducting independent research. Registering for this course will ensure proper classification for tax purposes. Only those students both actively engaged in research and receiving a stipend are eligible for this course.

  • Integrated Biomedical Sciences
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1844
  • 1 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

IBMS 96697 | Directed Readings

Readings and research not covered in the curriculum. which relate to the student's area of interest.

  • Integrated Biomedical Sciences
  • 1.09.0 credits    CRN 1845
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Fiorella Sierra

IIPS 20501 | International Relations
Fiorella Sierra

This course provides an introduction to the study of international relations and will cover several theoretical approaches to and empirical issues in the field of IR. Readings have been selected to highlight both traditional approaches to and more recent developments in world politics. The first half of the course focuses on contending theories of IR, while the second half of the course deals with more substantive issues. Empirical topics and subjects covered include: international security (nuclear weapons, ethnic conflict, and terrorism) - international political economy (trade, international finance, and globalization) - and 20th Century History (WWI, WWII, and the Cold War). In addition, we will examine several contemporary topics in international organization and law, including the environment, nongovernmental organizations, and human rights. We conclude by discussing the future of international relations in the 21st Century.

  • Inst. for Int'l Peace Studies
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1980
  • 0 of 3 enrolled
  • MWR 02:00 PM-03:15 PM 06/14 - 07/23
  • CSTE,IBCL,PSSP, SOSC,WKSS

IIPS 36000 | Directed Readings

This independent study course allows students to engage in intensive readings and reflection on a theme or topic within peace studies not covered by regular course offerings. The topic must be pre-approved by the director of undergraduate studies, and the proposed study plan must be consistent with the number of intended credit hours. A maximum of three credits (in total) may be applied toward the peace studies minor or supplementary major. The coursework must be completed under the direction of a Kroc Institute faculty member, and the student will receive a standard letter grade at the end of the semester. Please contact the assistant director of the undergraduate program for permission to register.

  • Inst. for Int'l Peace Studies
  • 1.03.0 credits    CRN 1969
  • 0 of 1 enrolled
  • ,

Ernesto Verdeja

IIPS 45000 | Peace Studies Internship
Ernesto Verdeja

This course offers qualified undergraduates the opportunity to earn credit for academic work produced as part of an approved summer or academic-year internship. Students are responsible for identifying and obtaining the internship, and the position and/or organization must be related to peacebuilding work in the field or have some substantive thematic connection to peace studies. The credit earned will not count toward the peace studies supplementary major or minor, and the written work produced will be evaluated as satisfactory or unsatisfactory by the director of undergraduate peace studies. Students seeking internship credit must contact the assistant director of the undergraduate peace studies program well in advance of the position's start date for details on coursework expectations and to arrange the necessary approvals and permissions.

  • Inst. for Int'l Peace Studies
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1971
  • 1 of 1 enrolled
  • ZINT,

IIPS 46000 | Directed Readings

This independent study course allows students to engage in intensive reading and reflection on a theme or topic within peace studies not covered by regular course offerings. The topic must be pre-approved by the director of undergraduate studies, and the proposed study plan must be consistent with the number of intended credit hours. A maximum of three credits (in total) may be applied toward the peace studies minor or supplementary major. The coursework must be completed under the direction of a Kroc Institute faculty member, and the student will receive a standard letter grade at the end of the semester. Please contact the assistant director of the undergraduate program for permission to register.

  • Inst. for Int'l Peace Studies
  • 1.03.0 credits    CRN 1970
  • 0 of 1 enrolled