Summer Courses 2022

Course Search

Course listings for Summer 2022 will be available in mid-December. Class meeting patterns are subject to change until registration opens on March 16th, 2022. If you have any questions regarding the Summer Online course offerings, please email summeronline@nd.edu.

For information on financial aid, please visit summersession.nd.edu/tuition-financial-aid.

Please note:

  • Graduate students can utilize their Summer Tuition Scholarships towards Summer Online courses.
  • Faculty and staff may use their educational benefits towards Summer Online courses for themselves and their dependents. More information can be found on the Ask HR site.

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Edward Hums

ACCT 20100 | Accountancy I
Edward Hums

An introduction to financial accounting and the accounting profession, with an emphasis on the decision-usefulness of accounting information. The course stresses the relation of accounting to economic activity, organizing information for decision-making, the resource acquisition decision, the uses of cash and noncash resources, the accounting for selling and manufacturing activities, and the information needs of multiple owners, lenders and equity holders. A prerequisite of all accountancy and finance courses. Course cannot be taken Pass/Fail.

  • Accountancy
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1990
  • 45 of 48 enrolled
  • MTWR 05:30 PM-07:20 PM 05/30 - 07/08
  • BA02,OLF,ZIMB,

Edward Hums

ACCT 20200 | Accountancy II
Edward Hums

A continuation of the introduction to accounting, with an emphasis on the use of accounting information and analysis for management decision and control. The purpose of the course is the learning of accounting techniques such as budget preparation, cost-volume-profit analysis, variable costing, contribution margins, relevant costing, performance evaluation of business units, transfer pricing and responsibility accounting for the planning, decision making and management control inside an organization. To complete a general knowledge of accounting and its usefulness in financial reporting and control the course also includes an introduction to auditing, attestation, corporate governance and the impact of Sarbanes Oxley Act on business organizations, plus an introduction to US taxation for individuals and corporations Course cannot be taken Pass/Fail.

  • Accountancy
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1991
  • 23 of 48 enrolled
  • MTWR 08:00 PM-09:50 PM 05/30 - 07/08
  • BA02,OLF,ZIMB,

Alan Huebner

ACMS 20215 | R Programming
Alan Huebner

In this course, you will learn the foundational skills necessary in R that will enable you to acquire and manipulate data, complete exploratory data analysis (EDA), and create visualizations to communicate your findings. Note: this course is delivered fully online. The course design combines required live weekly meetings online with self-scheduled lectures, problems, assignments, and interactive learning materials. To participate, students will need to have a computer with webcam, reliable internet connection, and a quiet place to participate in live sessions

  • Applied & Comp Math and Stats
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 1985
  • 12 of 15 enrolled
  • T 07:00 PM-09:00 PM 05/31 - 07/15
  • OLF,ZIMB,

Daniel Johnson

ACMS 20216 | Python Programming
Daniel Johnson

In this course, you will learn the foundational skills necessary in Python that will enable you to acquire and manipulate data, model data for the purposes of scientific analysis, and create visualizations to communicate your findings. The course will introduce you to efficient scientific computing using NumPy. You will learn how to apply the pandas library to perform a variety of data manipulation tasks, including selecting, subsetting, combining, grouping, and aggregating data. You will also learn how to generate and customize visualizations with matplotlib. The course will give you the basic ideas and intuition behind modern data analysis methods and their applications, with a strong focus on a course project and weekly assignments. Note: this course is delivered fully online. The course design combines required live weekly meetings online with self-scheduled lectures, problems, assignments, and interactive learning materials. To participate, students will need to have a computer with webcam, reliable internet connection, and a quiet place to participate in live sessions.

  • Applied & Comp Math and Stats
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 1987
  • 4 of 15 enrolled
  • W 07:00 PM-09:00 PM 05/31 - 07/15
  • OLF,ZIMB,

Alan Huebner

ACMS 30617 | SQL For Data Science
Alan Huebner

This course will teach students how to use Structured Query Language (SQL) to access and manipulate data stored in databases. Students will learn fundamental commands for filtering records, selecting variables, and merging data tables. These skills will be applied in the context of solving statistical problems in which students are presented with a research question, use SQL to obtain the appropriate data set, and then use the data to create an appropriate visualization and/or conduct a statistical inference to answer the question.

  • Applied & Comp Math and Stats
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1989
  • 4 of 30 enrolled
  • M 07:00 PM-08:50 PM 05/31 - 07/15
  • OLF,

Victoria Woodard

ACMS 50850 | Intermediate Probability
Victoria Woodard

This course introduces the theory of probability with emphasis on applications. Topics include discrete and continuous random variables, conditional probability and independent events, generating functions, laws of large numbers, the central limit theorem, Markov chains, Martingales, Brownian motion and stochastic processes. This course is intended for Master students and is not a qualified course for ACMS Ph D written exam. ACMS students in the Ph D program should take ACMS 60850 instead.

  • Applied & Comp Math and Stats
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1966
  • 1 of 5 enrolled
  • R 07:30 PM-09:00 PM 05/30 - 07/22
  • OLF,

Alan Huebner

ACMS 60051 | R programming
Alan Huebner

In this course, you will learn the foundational skills necessary in R that will enable you to acquire and manipulate data, complete exploratory data analysis (EDA), and create visualizations to communicate your findings. Note: this course is delivered fully online. The course design combines required live weekly meetings online with self-scheduled lectures, problems, assignments, and interactive learning materials. To participate, students will need to have a computer with webcam, reliable internet connection, and a quiet place to participate in live sessions

  • Applied & Comp Math and Stats
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 1986
  • 14 of 15 enrolled
  • T 07:00 PM-09:00 PM 05/31 - 07/15
  • OLF,ZIMB,

Daniel Johnson

ACMS 60052 | Python Programming
Daniel Johnson

In this course, you will learn the foundational skills necessary in Python that will enable you to acquire and manipulate data, model data for the purposes of scientific analysis, and create visualizations to communicate your findings. The course will introduce you to efficient scientific computing using NumPy. You will learn how to apply the pandas library to perform a variety of data manipulation tasks, including selecting, subsetting, combining, grouping, and aggregating data. You will also learn how to generate and customize visualizations with matplotlib. The course will give you the basic ideas and intuition behind modern data analysis methods and their applications, with a strong focus on a course project and weekly assignments. Note: this course is delivered fully online. The course design combines required live weekly meetings online with self-scheduled lectures, problems, assignments, and interactive learning materials. To participate, students will need to have a computer with webcam, reliable internet connection, and a quiet place to participate in live sessions.

  • Applied & Comp Math and Stats
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 1988
  • 16 of 17 enrolled
  • W 07:00 PM-09:00 PM 05/31 - 07/15
  • OLF,ZIMB,

Alan Huebner

ACMS 60617 | SQL For Data Science
Alan Huebner

This course will teach students how to use Structured Query Language (SQL) to access and manipulate data stored in databases. Students will learn fundamental commands for filtering records, selecting variables, and merging data tables. These skills will be applied in the context of solving statistical problems in which students are presented with a research question, use SQL to obtain the appropriate data set, and then use the data to create an appropriate visualization and/or conduct a statistical inference to answer the question.

  • Applied & Comp Math and Stats
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 2080
  • 14 of 15 enrolled
  • M 07:00 PM-08:50 PM 05/31 - 07/15
  • OLF,

Victoria Woodard

ACMS 60849 | Intermediate Probability
Victoria Woodard

This course introduces the theory of probability with emphasis on applications. Topics include discrete and continuous random variables, conditional probability and independent events, generating functions, laws of large numbers, the central limit theorem, Markov chains, Martingales, Brownian motion and stochastic processes. This course is intended for Master students and is not a qualified course for ACMS PhD written exam. ACMS students in the PhD program should take ACMS 60850 instead.

  • Applied & Comp Math and Stats
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1969
  • 8 of 15 enrolled
  • R 07:30 PM-09:00 PM 05/30 - 07/22
  • OLF,

Sara Fahling

ARST 20401 | Photography I
Sara Fahling

BA Core Option/BFA Core. MATERIALS FEE. This course is an introduction to the theory and practice of still photography. It is designed for all students interested in developing their photographic skills and also serves as the entry-level sequence for the photo major in studio art. The course is based on the use of digital cameras. Adobe Lightroom software and professional quality inkjet printing. Creative assignments introduce students to various thematic approaches including documentary work and portraits. Presentations cover both historical and contemporary approaches to the medium. A digital SLR camera with manual controls is highly recommended; or students may check out departmental cameras to complete assignments. A portable hard drive compatible with the Apple OS platform is required for storing personal files.

  • Art Studio
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1926
  • 13 of 13 enrolled
  • MWR 10:30 AM-12:15 PM 05/30 - 07/22
  • 2DCO,CDDA,CDDF,OLF,ZUG3, FNAR,WKAR

James O'Brien

BALW 20150 | Bus Law Contracts & Agency
James O'Brien

Students taking this course will gain an understanding of the American legal system and learn fundamental rules of law, particularly of torts, contracts, sales, and agency. Students will develop an appreciation of how law affects business decision-making, of competing policy concerns underlying the law, and of ethical dimensions of legal issues and business situations. Required for all BA students. Course cannot be taken Pass/Fail.

  • Bus Admin - Business Law
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1992
  • 46 of 46 enrolled
  • MTWRF 10:00 AM-12:00 PM 05/30 - 06/24
  • BA02,OLF,ZIMB,

Mitchell Olsen

BASC 20250 | Principles of Marketing
Mitchell Olsen

A study of markets, institutions, and the environment in which business firms operate with attention to the effect these facets, forces, and issues have on the firm's overall marketing strategy.

  • Business Administration - SC
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2122
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • MW 07:30 PM-09:00 PM 05/30 - 07/22
  • OLF,

Joseph O'Tousa

BIOS 10110 | Biology and Society
Joseph O'Tousa

Increased understanding of biological processes has fueled the development of new biotechnology. The course covers topics of current relevance, including the use of antibiotics, the development of genetically modified foods, genetic testing capabilities, stem cell technologies, cancer causes and treatments. Each topic is developed through reading assignments, instructor presentations, review of news media, and in class group interactions. A heightened awareness of the topic, and opposing viewpoints, will be developed through student debates and other in-class activities. Grading is based on class participation, online quizzes, assignments, and a final exam. <p> Note: this course is delivered fully online. The course design combines required live weekly meetings online with self-scheduled lectures, problems, assignments, and interactive learning materials. To participate, students will need to have a computer with webcam, reliable internet connection, and a quiet place to participate in live sessions.

  • Biological Sciences
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2076
  • 17 of 25 enrolled
  • TR 06:00 PM-07:30 PM 05/30 - 07/22
  • OLF,ZIMB, NASC,WKST

David Hyde

BIOS 20250 | Classical & Molecular Genetics
David Hyde

This course deals with two major areas. The first area is classical genetics: Mendelian principles, chromosome mechanics, linkage and recombination, and chromosomal mutations. The second area is molecular genetics: DNA replication, RNA transcription, protein translation, recombinant DNA techniques, the nature of the gene and regulation of gene expression. However, these areas are not mutually exclusive and often the same concept is applied at different times in the course. The integration of topics at different points throughout the course will help to reinforce the material for the student and demonstrate how our understanding of genetics has been built over time. Pre-requisites: Students are required to have completed a year-long Introductory Biology sequence prior to taking this genetics course.

  • Biological Sciences
  • 4.0 credits    CRN 2079
  • 4 of 26 enrolled
  • MR 07:00 PM-09:00 PM 05/23 - 07/22
  • CHSE,OLF,

Grace Hamilton

CDT 20101 | VCD 1: Fundamentals of Design
Grace Hamilton

MATERIALS FEE. This foundation 3-D design studio begins as a natural extension of Basic Design. Students are encouraged to think and work in three-dimensional media. A series of fundamental design problems are assigned during the course of the semester. Emphasis is placed on the transformation of imagination from mind to paper to model. Computer-aided design (CAD) is also introduced into assignments.

  • Computing & Digtl Technologies
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2275
  • 0 of 1 enrolled
  • MW 01:00 PM-03:00 PM 06/13 - 07/22
  • OLF, FNAR,WKAR

Tobias Flattery

CDT 20512 | Robot Ethics
Tobias Flattery

Robots or "autonomous systems" play an ever-increasing role in many areas, from weapons systems and driverless cars to health care and consumer services. As a result, it is ever more important to ask whether it makes any sense to speak of such systems' behaving ethically and how we can build into their programming what some call "ethics modules." After a brief technical introduction to the field, this course will approach these questions through contemporary philosophical literature on robot ethics and through popular media, including science fiction text and video. This is an online course with required, regular class sessions each week. Class meetings are online via Zoom webinar software (provided by the University).Note: this course is delivered fully online. The course design combines required live weekly meetings online with self-scheduled lectures, problems, assignments, and interactive learning materials. To participate, students will need to have a computer with webcam, reliable internet connection, and a quiet place to participate in live sessions.

  • Computing & Digtl Technologies
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2068
  • 2 of 3 enrolled
  • MR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM 05/30 - 07/22
  • CDCS,CDDF,OLF,ZIMB, PHI2,WKSP

Alan Huebner

CDT 20641 | R Programming
Alan Huebner

In this course, you will learn the foundational skills necessary in R that will enable you to acquire and manipulate data, complete exploratory data analysis (EDA), and create visualizations to communicate your findings. Note: this course is delivered fully online. The course design combines required live weekly meetings online with self-scheduled lectures, problems, assignments, and interactive learning materials. To participate, students will need to have a computer with webcam, reliable internet connection, and a quiet place to participate in live sessions. Students with other prerequisite courses or equivalent background preparation may enroll by permission of the instructor or permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies, Professor Alan Huebner (Alan.Huebner.10@nd.edu).

  • Computing & Digtl Technologies
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 2069
  • 4 of 5 enrolled
  • T 07:00 PM-09:00 PM 05/31 - 07/15
  • CDDF,CDTD,OLF,ZIMB,

Daniel Johnson

CDT 20642 | Python Programming
Daniel Johnson

In this course, you will learn the foundational skills necessary in Python that will enable you to acquire and manipulate data, model data for the purposes of scientific analysis, and create visualizations to communicate your findings. The course will introduce you to efficient scientific computing using NumPy. You will learn how to apply the pandas library to perform a variety of data manipulation tasks, including selecting, subsetting, combining, grouping, and aggregating data. You will also learn how to generate and customize visualizations with matplotlib. The course will give you the basic ideas and intuition behind modern data analysis methods and their applications, with a strong focus on a course project and weekly assignments. Note: this course is delivered fully online. The course design combines required live weekly meetings online with self-scheduled lectures, problems, assignments, and interactive learning materials. To participate, students will need to have a computer with webcam, reliable internet connection, and a quiet place to participate in live sessions. Students with other prerequisite courses or equivalent background preparation may enroll by permission of the instructor or permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies, Professor Alan Huebner (Alan.Huebner.10@nd.edu).

  • Computing & Digtl Technologies
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 2070
  • 1 of 5 enrolled
  • W 07:00 PM-09:00 PM 05/31 - 07/15
  • CDDF,CDTD,OLF,ZIMB,

Grace Hamilton

CDT 21102 | VCD Software Tutorial
Grace Hamilton

This one-credit course will focus on Adobe Creative Suite software. The class will meet one evening per week throughout the course of the semester. Programs and topics to be covered will be Adobe Photoshop, InDesign, Adobe Illustrator, proper file preparation, and font access and usage.

  • Computing & Digtl Technologies
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 2274
  • 0 of 1 enrolled
  • R 01:00 PM-02:00 PM 06/13 - 07/22
  • OLF,

Katherine Walden

CDT 30010 | Elements of Computing I
Katherine Walden

Introduction to programming for students without prior programming experience. Programming structures suitable for basic computation. Elements of computer organization and networking. Development of programming skills including data manipulation, multimedia programming, and networking. Standards for exchange and presentation of data. Comprehensive programming experience using Python.

  • Computing & Digtl Technologies
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2271
  • 2 of 5 enrolled
  • MWR 05:00 PM-06:30 PM 05/30 - 07/22
  • CDCR,OLF,

Alan Huebner

CDT 30643 | SQL For Data Science
Alan Huebner

This course will teach students how to use Structured Query Language (SQL) to access and manipulate data stored in databases. Students will learn fundamental commands for filtering records, selecting variables, and merging data tables. These skills will be applied in the context of solving statistical problems in which students are presented with a research question, use SQL to obtain the appropriate data set, and then use the data to create an appropriate visualization and/or conduct a statistical inference to answer the question.

  • Computing & Digtl Technologies
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 2071
  • 2 of 5 enrolled
  • M 07:00 PM-08:50 PM 05/31 - 07/15
  • CDDF,CDTD,OLF,ZIMB,

Sara Fahling

CDT 31420 | Photography I
Sara Fahling

BA Core Option/BFA Core. MATERIALS FEE. This course is an introduction to the theory and practice of still photography. It is designed for all students interested in developing their photographic skills and also serves as the entry-level sequence for the photo major in studio art. The course is based on the use of digital cameras. Adobe Lightroom software and professional quality inkjet printing. Creative assignments introduce students to various thematic approaches including documentary work and portraits. Presentations cover both historical and contemporary approaches to the medium. A digital SLR camera with manual controls is highly recommended; or students may check out departmental cameras to complete assignments. A portable hard drive compatible with the Apple OS platform is required for storing personal files.

  • Computing & Digtl Technologies
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2276
  • 0 of 2 enrolled
  • MWR 10:30 AM-12:15 PM 05/30 - 07/22
  • CDDA,CDDF,OLF, FNAR,WKAR

Kevin Walsh

CE 30150 | Mod & Dyn Bldg Sys
Kevin Walsh

Course provides a primer on structural dynamics for single and multi-degree-of-freedom systems with application to building systems, as well as an introduction to modeling of building systems within commercial software packages.

  • Civil Engineering
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2150
  • 2 of 3 enrolled
  • TBA 06/13 - 07/22
  • OLF,

Jesse Arlen

CLAR 10001 | Introduction to Old Armenian
Jesse Arlen

This course will introduce students to Old (or ?Classical?) Armenian, the literary form of the language from the fifth to the nineteenth century and the liturgical language of the Armenian Orthodox Church today. An Indo-European language, Armenian is distantly related to Greek, Latin, English, and other western languages. It has a vast library of literature comprised of original compositions as well as translations from Greek, Syriac, Latin, and Arabic, among others. Some ancient texts, like certain works of Philo, Irenaeus, and Eusebius, survive only in Armenian translation. Other original compositions, like the prayer book of Gregory of Narek, are masterpieces of world literature. Students will learn the Armenian alphabet, basic grammar, and vocabulary, and will read simple prose narratives, while also gaining an appreciation for the culture and tradition of one of the ancient Christian peoples of the East. The course will be of interest to students in classics, medieval/byzantine/near eastern studies, biblical studies, theology, and liturgy.

  • Armenian Language
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2057
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • MTR 04:00 PM-06:00 PM 05/31 - 07/07
  • OLF,

Jesse Arlen

CLAR 60001 | Introduction to Old Armenian
Jesse Arlen

This course will introduce students to Old (or ?Classical?) Armenian, the literary form of the language from the fifth to the nineteenth century and the liturgical language of the Armenian Orthodox Church today. An Indo-European language, Armenian is distantly related to Greek, Latin, English, and other western languages. It has a vast library of literature comprised of original compositions as well as translations from Greek, Syriac, Latin, and Arabic, among others. Some ancient texts, like certain works of Philo, Irenaeus, and Eusebius, survive only in Armenian translation. Other original compositions, like the prayer book of Gregory of Narek, are masterpieces of world literature. Students will learn the Armenian alphabet, basic grammar, and vocabulary, and will read simple prose narratives, while also gaining an appreciation for the culture and tradition of one of the ancient Christian peoples of the East. The course will be of interest to students in classics, medieval/byzantine/near eastern studies, biblical studies, theology, and liturgy.

  • Armenian Language
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2058
  • 7 of 10 enrolled
  • MTR 04:00 PM-06:00 PM 05/31 - 07/07
  • OLF,

Hany Takla

CLCO 10001 | Introduction to Coptic
Hany Takla

This course introduces students to the basic grammar and vocabulary of Coptic, the final descendant of ancient Egyptian. Coptic is important for any who are interested in, among other things, early translations of the Bible, monasticism, early Christianity, liturgy, hagiography, homilies, "Gnosticism" (Nag Hammadi), and Manichaeism. This introduction will be focused on the two best attested Coptic dialects, Sahidic and Bohairic. The course is designed to enable students who have no previous training in Coptic to read simple to moderately difficult texts. A Coptic reading course will follow in the next semester. This course satisfies language requirements for certain programs; please check with your academic advisor.

  • Coptic Language
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2059
  • 1 of 5 enrolled
  • MTWR 06:00 PM-08:00 PM 05/31 - 07/07
  • OLF,

Hany Takla

CLCO 60001 | Introduction to Coptic
Hany Takla

This course introduces students to the basic grammar and vocabulary of Coptic, the final descendant of ancient Egyptian. Coptic is important for any who are interested in, among other things, early translations of the Bible, monasticism, early Christianity, liturgy, hagiography, homilies, "Gnosticism" (Nag Hammadi), and Manichaeism. This introduction will be focused on the two best attested Coptic dialects, Sahidic and Bohairic. The course is designed to enable students who have no previous training in Coptic to read simple to moderately difficult texts. A Coptic reading course will follow in the next semester. This course satisfies language requirements for certain programs; please check with your academic advisor.

  • Coptic Language
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2060
  • 6 of 8 enrolled
  • MTWR 06:00 PM-08:00 PM 05/31 - 07/07
  • OLF,

Nikolas Churik

CLGR 30199 | Patristic and Byzantine Greek
Nikolas Churik

The Eastern Roman (Byzantine) Empire holds a crucial place in the history of Greek literature. Not only did Byzantine scribes forge the vital link between antiquity and modernity, but Byzantine mystics, poets, philosophers, and statesmen have left behind a vast and varied corpus of texts expressing the diverse discourses contributing to the formation of Byzantium. In this course, students will engage this corpus through a survey of texts composed in different historical and geographical contexts and encompassing a variety of genres (including historiography, hagiography, mystical literature, and poetry). In this course, students will encounter the writings of John Chrysostom, Gregory of Nazianzus, Romanos Melodos, the nun Kassia, Michael Psellos, Anna Komnene, and others. Prerequisite: At least three semesters of classical or Koine Greek.

  • Greek Language and Literature
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2044
  • 1 of 5 enrolled
  • MTWR 02:00 PM-03:40 PM 06/13 - 07/22
  • ALLN,LANG,OLF,SCLN,ZIMB,

Nikolas Churik

CLGR 60199 | Patristic and Byzantine Greek
Nikolas Churik

The Eastern Roman (Byzantine) Empire holds a crucial place in the history of Greek literature. Not only did Byzantine scribes forge the vital link between antiquity and modernity, but Byzantine mystics, poets, philosophers, and statesmen have left behind a vast and varied corpus of texts expressing the diverse discourses contributing to the formation of Byzantium. In this course, students will engage this corpus through a survey of texts composed in different historical and geographical contexts and encompassing a variety of genres (including historiography, hagiography, mystical literature, and poetry). In this course, students will encounter the writings of John Chrysostom, Gregory of Nazianzus, Romanos Melodos, the nun Kassia, Michael Psellos, Anna Komnene, and others. Prerequisite: At least three semesters of classical or Koine Greek.

  • Greek Language and Literature
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2043
  • 4 of 10 enrolled
  • MTWR 02:00 PM-03:40 PM 06/13 - 07/22
  • OLF,ZIMB,

Tiziana Serafini, Suzanne Shanahan

CSC 10180 | Italian LTBC
Tiziana Serafini, Suzanne Shanahan

This is a one-credit interdisciplinary and experiential learning course offered through Summer Online in June 2022 to qualified Notre Dame students. This course prepares students to serve as language coaches for immigrants in Italy participating in the Italian for Immigrants non-credit training program. Students will tackle issues of immigration and foreign language pedagogy and will learn how to use their language knowledge for service to the underprivileged. This course is open to all language students who have reached a 102 level in their foreign language. Precedence will be given to students of Italian. Approximately 4 Notre Dame students will be hired to participate in this course. Students who are not hired will be prepared to support language training for immigrants.

  • Center for Social Concerns
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 2257
  • 0 of 1 enrolled
  • TR 11:00 AM-12:15 PM 05/30 - 06/20
  • OLF,

Katherine Walden

CSE 10101 | Elements of Computing I
Katherine Walden

Introduction to programming using the Python language. This course assumes no prior programming experience and emphasizes computational thinking, problem-solving, object-oriented programming, and programming literacy. Topics covered include basic syntax, data types, conditional execution, control flow structures, file I/O, and basic data manipulation. This includes basic programming constructs such as data, variables, functions, conditionals, loops, lists, files, sets, and dictionaries.

  • Computer Science and Engr.
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2089
  • 12 of 25 enrolled
  • MWR 05:00 PM-06:30 PM 05/30 - 07/22
  • CDCR,OLF,ZIMB,

Shreya Kumar

CSE 30332 | Programming Paradigms
Shreya Kumar

Programming language overview: imperative and functional languages; logic programming. Scripting languages and tools. Development environments. Multilanguage interfacing. Case studies. Comprehensive programming practice using several languages.

  • Computer Science and Engr.
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2107
  • 11 of 25 enrolled
  • MR 05:30 PM-07:30 PM 05/30 - 07/22
  • OLF,

Jennifer Schnur

CSE 40647 | Data Science
Jennifer Schnur

Data mining and machine learning techniques have been widely used in many domains. The focus of this course will primarily be on fundamental concepts and methods in data science, with relevant inclusions and references from probability, statistics, pattern recognition, databases, and information theory. The course will give students an opportunity to implement and experiment with some of the concepts (e.g., classification, clustering, frequent pattern mining), and also apply them to the real-world data sets.

  • Computer Science and Engr.
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2108
  • 9 of 22 enrolled
  • TR 07:00 PM-09:00 PM 05/30 - 07/22
  • OLF,

Michael Wicks

CSE 40693 | Modern Web Development
Michael Wicks

This course will focus on topics of modern web app development such as: MVC vs Component-based app architecture, RESTful API development, database schema design, interfacing with third-party APIs and more. In addition, many common JavaScript paradigms will be covered including asynchronous programming patterns, object-oriented JavaScript with classes, and unit testing. Discussions of engineering trade-offs will be complemented by projects in which students will develop their own web apps. These techniques are used by companies such as Groupon, Airbnb, Netflix, Medium and PayPal which have all adopted a full stack JavaScript approach, and are very useful to those interested in smaller tech startups as well.

  • Computer Science and Engr.
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2109
  • 10 of 25 enrolled
  • TR 05:00 PM-06:30 PM 05/30 - 07/22
  • OLF,

Jennifer Schnur

CSE 60647 | Data Science
Jennifer Schnur

Data mining and machine learning techniques have been widely used in many domains. The focus of this course will primarily be on fundamental concepts and methods in data science, with relevant inclusions and references from probability, statistics, pattern recognition, databases, and information theory. The course will give students an opportunity to implement and experiment with some of the concepts (e.g., classification, clustering, frequent pattern mining), and also apply them to the real-world data sets.

  • Computer Science and Engr.
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2272
  • 7 of 8 enrolled
  • TR 07:00 PM-09:00 PM 05/30 - 07/22
  • OLF,

Michael Wicks

CSE 60693 | Modern Web and App Dev
Michael Wicks

This course will focus on topics of modern web app development such as: MVC vs Component-based app architecture,RESTful API development, database schema design, interfacing with third-party APIs and more. In addition, manycommon JavaScript paradigms will be covered including asynchronous programming patterns, object-oriented JavaScript with classes, and unit testing. Discussions of engineering trade-offs will be complemented by projects in which students will develop their own web apps. These techniques are used by companies such as Groupon, Airbnb, Netflix, Medium and PayPal which have all adopted a full stack JavaScript approach, and are very useful to those interested in smaller tech startups as well.

  • Computer Science and Engr.
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2273
  • 3 of 3 enrolled
  • TR 05:00 PM-06:30 PM 05/30 - 07/22
  • OLF,

Anre Venter

CSEM 23103 | College Seminar
Anre Venter

Please visit csem.nd.edu for the specific descriptions associated with each College Seminar section and to learn more about the course. College Seminar is a unique one-semester course shared by all sophomores majoring in the College of Arts and Letters at the University of Notre Dame. The course offers students an introduction to the diversity and distinctive focus of the College. Specific sections vary in topics and texts (i.e. there will not be a shared reading list), but all feature an interdisciplinary approach, commitment to engaging important questions, employment of major works, and emphasis on the development of oral skills.

  • College Seminar
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1970
  • 11 of 16 enrolled
  • MTWR 07:15 PM-09:45 PM 06/13 - 07/08
  • CSEM,OLF,

Bernard Forjwuor

CSEM 23103 | College Seminar
Bernard Forjwuor

Please visit csem.nd.edu for the specific descriptions associated with each College Seminar section and to learn more about the course. College Seminar is a unique one-semester course shared by all sophomores majoring in the College of Arts and Letters at the University of Notre Dame. The course offers students an introduction to the diversity and distinctive focus of the College. Specific sections vary in topics and texts (i.e. there will not be a shared reading list), but all feature an interdisciplinary approach, commitment to engaging important questions, employment of major works, and emphasis on the development of oral skills.

  • College Seminar
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2067
  • 6 of 16 enrolled
  • MTR 05:00 PM-07:15 PM 06/13 - 07/22
  • CSEM,OLF,

Grace Hamilton

DESN 20101 | VCD 1: Fundamentals of Design
Grace Hamilton

MATERIALS FEE. Fundamentals of Design is a gateway course for Visual Communication Design that introduces students to basic design elements like color, form, composition and typography. This course explores and helps develop an understanding of the delicate balance between these design elements and how they have been skillfully used over time to create some of the most persuasive images and enduring messages. The course is an exercise in deconstruction and reconstruction of visual images using design elements as tools. Through assignments, students will work digitally to explore color, form, composition, texture and typography; first individually and then in conjunction with other elements. Initial assignments will be short and will focus on the understanding of a singular element. As the course progresses, students will be expected to use experiences from these short assignments and use them as building block for more complex projects. Above all, the course builds a vigorous foundation that allows students to acquire visual skillsets that serve as a firm foundation for advanced level courses in Visual Communication Design.

  • Design
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2050
  • 5 of 14 enrolled
  • MW 01:00 PM-03:00 PM 06/13 - 07/22
  • 2DCO,OLF,ZIMB,ZUG3, FNAR,WKAR

Grace Hamilton

DESN 21102 | VCD Software Tutorial
Grace Hamilton

This one-credit course will focus on Adobe Creative Suite software. The class will meet once per week throughout the course of the semester. Programs and topics to be covered will be Adobe Photoshop, InDesign, Adobe Illustrator, proper file preparation, and font access and usage.

  • Design
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 2061
  • 5 of 14 enrolled
  • R 01:00 PM-02:00 PM 06/13 - 07/22
  • OLF,

Grace Hamilton

DESN 60101 | VCD 1: Fundamentals of Design
Grace Hamilton

MATERIALS FEE. Fundamentals of Design is a gateway course for Visual Communication Design that introduces students to basic design elements like color, form, composition and typography. This course explores and helps develop an understanding of the delicate balance between these design elements and how they have been skillfully used over time to create some of the most persuasive images and enduring messages. The course is an exercise in deconstruction and reconstruction of visual images using design elements as tools. Through assignments, students will work digitally to explore color, form, composition, texture and typography; first individually and then in conjunction with other elements. Initial assignments will be short and will focus on the understanding of a singular element. As the course progresses, students will be expected to use experiences from these short assignments and use them as building block for more complex projects. Above all, the course builds a vigorous foundation that allows students to acquire visual skillsets that serve as a firm foundation for advanced level courses in Visual Communication Design.

  • Design
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2353
  • 1 of 2 enrolled
  • MW 01:00 PM-03:00 PM 06/13 - 07/22
  • OLF, FNAR,WKAR

Grace Hamilton

DESN 61102 | VCD Software Tutorial
Grace Hamilton

This zero-credit course will focus on Adobe Creative Suite software. The class will meet one evening per week throughout the course of the semester. Programs and topics to be covered will be Adobe Photoshop, InDesign, Adobe Illustrator, proper file preparation, and font access and usage.

  • Design
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 2362
  • 1 of 2 enrolled
  • R 01:00 PM-02:00 PM 06/13 - 07/22
  • OLF,

Carolyn Hardin

DS 60301 | Storytelling and Communication
Carolyn Hardin

This course is designed to develop communication skills for data scientists working in industry and business contexts. Students master the art of clear, effective, and engaging scientific and technical communications, with attention to the business necessity of translating complex technical subjects into actionable insights for a lay audience. Students identify and analyze rhetorical situations in technical discourse communities, assist them in defining their purpose in writing/presenting information, and teach them to design materials and deliver presentations that are properly targeted and appropriately styled.

  • Data Science
  • 1.5 credits    CRN 2156
  • 36 of 50 enrolled
  • TBA 05/23 - 06/20
  • OLF,ZIMB,

John Behrens

DS 60305 | Ethics and Policy in DS
John Behrens

Data-informed decision-making has created new opportunities, e.g. personalized marketing and recommendations, but also expands the set of possible risks, e.g. privacy, security, etc.; this is especially true for businesses collecting, storing, and analyzing human data. Organizations need to consider the "should we?" question with regard to data and analytics, and not just be concerned with ?can we??. In this course, we will explore ethical frameworks, guidelines, codes, and checklists, and also consider how they apply to all phases of the data science process. Existing research ethics standards provide a necessary but insufficient foundation when doing data science and analytics. Together, we will wrestle with the rapidly-changing capabilities, conflicts, and desires that emerge from new data practices. Upon completion of the course, you will be able to identify and balance: what an organization wants to do from a business perspective, can do from technical and legal perspectives, and should do from an ethical perspective.

  • Data Science
  • 1.5 credits    CRN 2237
  • 36 of 50 enrolled
  • TBA 06/27 - 07/25
  • OLF,ZIMB,

Christopher Frederick

DS 60620 | Databases and Data Security
Christopher Frederick

Calibrated to data science applications, this course focuses on effective techniques in designing relational databases and retrieving data from them using both SQL and R. It provides an introduction to relational databases, including topics such as relational calculus and algebra, integrity constraints, distributed databases, and data security. Students are introduced to database technologies utilized in industry, such as NoSQL, graph databases, and Hadoop. The course also introduces students to the fundamental concepts of cybersecurity and privacy relevant to data science.

  • Data Science
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2236
  • 36 of 50 enrolled
  • TBA 05/26 - 07/28
  • OLF,ZIMB,

Eva Dziadula

ECON 10020 | Principles of Macroeconomics
Eva Dziadula

A continuation of introduction to economics with emphasis on the measurement of national economic performance, alternative explanations of short-run economic fluctuations and long-run economic growth, money and credit, fiscal and monetary policy.

  • Economics
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2073
  • 1 of 8 enrolled
  • MTR 08:00 PM-09:50 PM 05/30 - 07/15
  • OLF,ZFYS,ZIMB, SOSC,WKSS

Eva Dziadula

ECON 20020 | Principles of Macroeconomics
Eva Dziadula

A continuation of introduction to economics with emphasis on the measurement of national economic perfomance, alternative explanations of short-run economic fluctuations and long-run economic growth, money and credit, fiscal and monetary policy.

  • Economics
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2074
  • 6 of 17 enrolled
  • MTR 08:00 PM-09:50 PM 05/30 - 07/15
  • OLF,ZFTY,ZIMB, SOSC,WKSS

Ethan Jenkins

ECON 30330 | Statistics for Economics
Ethan Jenkins

This course seeks to introduce the student to the principles of probability and statistical theory appropriate for the study of economics. The emphasis of the course will be on hypothesis testing and regression analysis.

  • Economics
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2198
  • 5 of 25 enrolled
  • TWR 07:00 PM-08:30 PM 05/30 - 07/22
  • MPPE,OLF, WKQR

Brian Collier, Gail Mayotte

EDU 67980 | Special Topics in Education
Brian Collier, Gail Mayotte

This course provides an opportunity for students to explore issues and experiences in education with the approval of the Academic Director.

  • Education
  • 1.03.0 credits    CRN 1386
  • 0 of 15 enrolled
  • TBA 05/16 - 07/30
  • OLF,

Erin Wibbens, Gail Mayotte

EDU 67980 | Special Topics in Education
Erin Wibbens, Gail Mayotte

This course provides an opportunity for students to explore issues and experiences in education with the approval of the Academic Director.

  • Education
  • 1.03.0 credits    CRN 1787
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • OLF,

Laura Hamman

EDU 70110 | Teaching 2nd Language Learners
Laura Hamman

This course addresses the foundational principles of English learner instruction and language acquisition as applied to EL instruction and assessment. Content includes the integration of social, cultural, psychological, and pedagogical influences; historical and legal background of second language instruction; literacy, writing, and oral language development; and multicultural literature in the context of elementary, middle, and secondary levels.

  • Education
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1425
  • 36 of 45 enrolled
  • TBA 06/01 - 07/05 |WRF 12:00 PM-03:00 PM 07/06 - 07/08 |F 03:00 PM-05:00 PM 07/15 - 07/15 |MTWRS 01:00 PM-04:30 PM 07/16 - 07/21
  • OLF,

Christine Bonfiglio

EDU 70200 | Foundation in Inclusive Ed
Christine Bonfiglio

An introduction to inclusive education with a focus on understanding learner attributes including academic, behavioral, social/emotional and health issues is provided. Historical, philosophical, and ethical perspectives serve as a foundation for understanding learning strengths and challenges. Evidence-based frameworks and practices that seek to address complex learning needs promoting inclusive practice are emphasized. Clinical experiences in a Catholic school are required.

  • Education
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1316
  • 14 of 35 enrolled
  • MWF 01:00 PM-04:00 PM 05/07 - 06/20
  • OLF,

Christine Bonfiglio, Michael Faggella-Luby, Sean Smith

EDU 70201 | Critical Elements Inclusion
Christine Bonfiglio, Michael Faggella-Luby, Sean Smith

Critical elements of planning and instruction within a multi-tiered system of support are addressed. Assessment and data-based decision making are examined to address the learning needs of students who struggle in the classroom environment. Attention is given to accommodations and curricular modifications, as well as frameworks and strategies that impact behavior. Clinical experiences in a Catholic school are required.

  • Education
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 1317
  • 13 of 35 enrolled
  • MTWRF 03:00 PM-04:00 PM 06/21 - 07/23
  • OLF,

Christine Bonfiglio, Abby Giroux, Sean Smith

EDU 70202 | Collaboration, Community & Cul
Christine Bonfiglio, Abby Giroux, Sean Smith

Critical elements of professional collaboration and consultation within a multi-tiered system of support are addressed. Communication, roles/responsibilities, and culture of key stakeholders are a central focus. Teaming and problem-solving models are examined to address the needs of students who struggle in the classroom environment. Clinical experiences in a Catholic school are required.

  • Education
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 1318
  • 10 of 35 enrolled
  • MTWRF 03:00 PM-04:00 PM 06/07 - 07/04
  • OLF,

Christine Bonfiglio, Michael Faggella-Luby, Sean Smith

EDU 70204 | Policy & Practice Special Ed.
Christine Bonfiglio, Michael Faggella-Luby, Sean Smith

Effective practice and implications of special education policy for learners with diverse needs are provided. Specialized methods of service delivery are addressed for students with diagnoses. Attention is given to accommodations, curricular modifications, sensory integration, and transition planning. Evidence-based practices are advanced to enable successful individualized educational planning. Clinical experiences in a Catholic school are required.

  • Education
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1321
  • 10 of 35 enrolled
  • UMTWRFS 08:00 AM-05:00 PM 07/12 - 07/22
  • OLF,

EG 10310 | Selected topics in PHYS I

Selected topics in PHYS I as directed by the instructor

  • Engineering (Non-Departmental)
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 2376
  • 29 of 33 enrolled
  • TBA 06/13 - 07/22
  • OLF,

Gregory Macklem

EG 10565 | Selected Topics Calculus I/II
Gregory Macklem

Selected topics in Calculus I and Calculus II as directed by the instructor.

  • Engineering (Non-Departmental)
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 2361
  • 29 of 33 enrolled
  • MTWR 10:00 AM-11:00 AM 05/16 - 07/22
  • OLF,

Bryan Santin

ENGL 20157 | Free Speech
Bryan Santin

This introductory course surveys the core texts, doctrines, ideas, and cultural controversies related to First Amendment protections for free expression. We will be especially interested in some large questions: what is expression? How have our ideas of freedom of expression evolved as we enter the digital age? What kind of expression should be permissible? What happens when the public forum is fully online? What is the relationship between free expression and democratic-self government? Is there a difference between individual, group, and government speech? How do we navigate alternative ways of thinking about free expression in a global media ecosystem? We will consider a selection of exemplary cases, controversies, and literary texts: among our topics will include the following: the transformation of speech in the age of digital media; libel, satire and parody; piracy, intellectual property and copyright; privacy and surveillance; hate speech and incitement; obscenity and pornography. We will investigate the topic by studying relevant case law, literary texts (including fiction, film and new media), political philosophy, and information policy? Disclaimer: you will encounter speech that is potentially offensive and discomforting in this course. Note: this course is delivered fully online. The course design combines required live weekly meetings online with self-scheduled lectures, problems, assignments, and interactive learning materials. To participate, students will need to have a computer with webcam, reliable internet connection, and a quiet place to participate in live sessions.

  • English
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2141
  • 26 of 26 enrolled
  • MW 08:00 PM-09:30 PM 05/30 - 07/22
  • OLF, LIT,WKLI

Kristen Collett-Schmitt

FIN 30210 | Managerial Economics
Kristen Collett-Schmitt

This course provides a coordination of economic theory and managerial practice. Topics covered include: consumer demand, production functions, cost behavior, output determination, and pricing within various market structures.

  • Finance
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2118
  • 48 of 48 enrolled
  • TR 08:00 PM-09:55 PM 05/30 - 07/11
  • BA03,OLF,ZIMB, SOSC,WKSS

Ana Fauri

FTT 30511 | Intro to Film thru Brazil Cin.
Ana Fauri

Students will be able to improve their argumentative and analytical skills through the study of key issues and concepts in film studies. Film form and narrative, gender, class, stereotypes, the film auteur, cultural industry, violence and social denunciation will be some of the topics explored for the exploration of Brazilian case studies. Special emphasis will be given to the retomada -the rebirth of Brazilian cinema from the mid 1990s on - with in-depth analyses of feature films such as Carlota Joaquina (Carla Camurati, 1995), Central do Brasil (Walter Salles, 1998), CIdade de Deus (Fernando Meirelles, 2002) and Tropa de Elite (Jose' Padilha, 2007); documentary movies such as Edifcio Master (Eduardo Coutinho, 2002) and Santiago (Joao Moreira Salles, 2007) , as well as short movies such as Recife Frio (Kleber Mendonca Filho, 2009) and Eu nao Quero Voltar Sozinho (Daniel Ribeiro, 2010). Taught in English.

  • Film, Television, and Theatre
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2167
  • 3 of 5 enrolled
  • TWR 12:30 PM-03:30 PM 06/13 - 07/22
  • FTII,OLF, FNAR,WKAR

Nathaniel Myers

FTT 30600 | Shakespeare and Film
Nathaniel Myers

This course explores the phenomenon of Shakespeare and film, concentrating on the ranges of meaning provoked by the conjunction. We shall be looking at examples of films of Shakespeare plays both early and recent, both in English and in other languages, and both ones that stick close to the conventionalized and historicized conceptualizations of Shakespeare and adaptations at varying degrees of distance toward the erasure of Shakespeare from the text. The transportation of different forms of Shakespearean textualities (printed, theatrical, filmic) and the confrontation with the specificities of film produce a cultural phenomenon whose cultural meanings - meanings as Shakespeare and meanings as film - will be the subject of our investigations. Students will be required to view screenings of films on a regular basis during the semester. Note: this course is delivered fully online. The course design combines required live weekly meetings online with self-scheduled lectures, problems, assignments, and interactive learning materials. To participate, students will need to have a computer with webcam, reliable internet connection, and a quiet place to participate in live sessions. Students who will be on the Main campus or residing in the Michiana region are not eligible to enroll in this course. Cannot have taken: FTT 40600 , FTT 44600, FTT 60600

  • Film, Television, and Theatre
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2110
  • 10 of 25 enrolled
  • MW 04:00 PM-05:30 PM 05/30 - 07/22
  • MESE,OLF, FNAR,WKAR

Anre Venter, Theodore Mandell

FTT 30635 | Drunk on Film:
Anre Venter, Theodore Mandell

Alcohol Use Disorder is a chronic relapsing brain disease. But when presented on screen, it's entertainment. Why do we laugh, why do we cry, why do we emulate fictional characters whose drinking habits result in a life of debilitating addiction? From James Bond to Jonah Hill, the psychology and seduction of alcohol on film, television, and online will be analyzed. Furthermore, what is the relationship between the manner in which alcohol use/abuse is presented on screen and the manner in which alcohol is used and abused on, for example, college campuses? Surveying recent film history, we will examine how alcohol is used in story structure, as a character flaw or strength, and as a narrative device in the story arc of films across multiple film genres, (action/adventure, comedy, romance, etc). Why do characters drink, where do they drink, and how does the result of their "getting drunk" advance the narrative? We'll also look at non-fiction films that tackle issues of addiction, as a way of comparing character development in Hollywood films to the results of this same behavior in everyday life. Film materials will include weekly screenings outside of class, and academic articles relating to portrayal and analysis of alcohol use in film and television, including the business of marketing alcohol in print and television advertising. From the psychological perspective we will discuss the topic and process of social influence and how the presence of others influences our behavior. Questions of interest will include the following: what are the mechanisms by which group influence unfolds? How and why might we be persuaded? Does the manner, and if so how, in which alcohol use is portrayed in movies and the media reflect the processes and principles of social influence? Readings will include chapters on social influence, persuasion and academic articles evaluating the manner in which alcohol is portrayed and advertised and the effect this has on alcohol consumption. In addition, issues of addiction will be discussed - from understanding the basis of addiction to examining the efficacy of addiction treatment.

  • Film, Television, and Theatre
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2017
  • 30 of 30 enrolled
  • MTW 04:30 PM-07:00 PM 06/06 - 07/08
  • OLF,ZIMB, WKIN

Robert Norton

GE 60501 | German Graduate Reading
Robert Norton

Intended as review for graduate students who wish to take the GRE in German. The final examination of the course, if passed, fulfills the requirements of the GRE.

  • German
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1943
  • 18 of 30 enrolled
  • MTWR 10:00 AM-11:40 AM 06/13 - 07/22
  • OLF,

Kristin Rudenga, Dominique Vargas

GRED 60010 | Academic Career Preparation
Kristin Rudenga, Dominique Vargas

In this practical, discussion-based course, students will develop skills and perspectives for applying to, interviewing for, and navigating within academic jobs. Students will reflect on their experiences, strengths, and goals; develop and receive feedback on their application documents; learn and practice interview skills; and discuss how to succeed in academic life. Students who complete the course will be better prepared for the academic job market as well as for the challenges and opportunities of higher education careers.

  • Graduate Education
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 2085
  • 10 of 20 enrolled
  • TR 09:30 AM-11:15 AM 05/30 - 07/22
  • OLF,ZIMB,

Michelle Marvin

GRED 60015 | STEM Communication-Oral Pres
Michelle Marvin

Effective communication is an essential skill for success in scientific, engineering, and technical careers. In this course, graduate students from the STEM fields will develop their ability to communicate clearly and engagingly with multiple audiences, from peers and professors to potential employers, journalists, and family members. Drawing upon the latest science communication research, this course will help graduate students increase their comfort level and proficiency in orally presenting scientific research. By working through elevator pitches, lightning talks, poster presentations, conference presentations, and job talks, students will increase their competence as scientific communicators and hone their skills for future presentations.

  • Graduate Education
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 2086
  • 6 of 20 enrolled
  • R 01:00 PM-02:30 PM 05/30 - 07/22
  • OLF,ZIMB,

Michelle Marvin

GRED 60500 | Scientific Writing
Michelle Marvin

This course offers students in the sciences and engineering a focused study of the conventions of scientific writing. Through close analysis of published scientific papers, guest lectures from faculty in the sciences and engineering, and focused writing activities in a workshop environment, students will hone their writing skills and make a clear plan for their continued development as writers in their home disciplines.

  • Graduate Education
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 2035
  • 10 of 20 enrolled
  • T 01:00 PM-02:30 PM 05/30 - 07/22
  • OLF,

John Lubker

GRED 60802 | Leadership & Social Engagement
John Lubker

Leadership Advancing Socially Engaged Research is for selected students only.

  • Graduate Education
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1701
  • 15 of 20 enrolled
  • OLF,

Matthew Capdevielle

GRED 68002 | Article Accelerator
Matthew Capdevielle

The summer session Article Accelerator is an 8-week course designed to help graduate students and postdocs make consistent progress toward revising an existing piece of writing, such as a conference paper, seminar paper, or dissertation chapter, into an article manuscript ready to be submitted to a journal. Students will be assigned reading from Wendy Laura Belcher's book Writing Your Journal Article in Twelve Weeks and meet weekly to discuss the reading, check in with peers on progress and productivity, and participate in drafting and peer-editing exercises designed to model good article-preparation practices alongside Belcher's recommendations.

  • Graduate Education
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 2037
  • 8 of 20 enrolled
  • TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM 05/30 - 07/22
  • OLF,

Robert Lewandowski

ITAO 20600 | Business Technology&Analytics
Robert Lewandowski

Businesses today generate large amounts of data. Analysts are tasked with using that information to identify trends and problems, improve decision-making, increasing efficiency and optimize business processes. All of this can be achieved using Microsoft Excel and its add-on Business Intelligence tools such as Solver, Power Query and Power Pivot. This course provides an introduction and structure to analyzing what-if scenarios, organizing big data, using relational databases and developing clear data visualizations all using one application - Microsoft Excel.

  • IT, Analytics and Operations
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1978
  • 42 of 55 enrolled
  • WR 10:30 AM-12:10 PM 05/30 - 07/22
  • BA02,OLF,

Jonathan Reichental

ITAO 30390 | Crypto, Blockchain, and NFTs
Jonathan Reichental

This course will provide students with a comprehensive introduction to the world of cryptocurrencies, blockchain technologies, and NFTs. The course will cover what blockchain is and how it works. It will also explore many of the applications of the technology today including those in the financial industry, supply chain, and in government. In addition, cryptocurrencies, which run on top of blockchain technology are the most prevalent uses of blockchain. The course will cover how cryptocurrencies work, the cryptocurrency marketplace, and the future of digital money. Other uses of blockchain explored in the course will include non-fungible tokens (NFTs), DeFi, and Smart Contracts. Finally, the course will cover the ethical, legal, and socio-political challenges of these technologies. The course will feature guest lectures from Silicon Valley founders of startups in this space.

  • IT, Analytics and Operations
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2284
  • 0 of 30 enrolled
  • TR 12:00 PM-02:30 PM 05/30 - 07/22
  • OLF,ZIMB,

Ana Fauri

LLRO 40511 | Intro to Film thru Brazil Cin.
Ana Fauri

Students will be able to improve their argumentative and analytical skills through the study of key issues and concepts in film studies. Film form and narrative, gender, class, stereotypes, the film auteur, cultural industry, violence and social denunciation will be some of the topics explored for the exploration of Brazilian case studies. Special emphasis will be given to the retomada -the rebirth of Brazilian cinema from the mid 1990s on - with in-depth analyses of feature films such as Carlota Joaquina (Carla Camurati, 1995), Central do Brasil (Walter Salles, 1998), CIdade de Deus (Fernando Meirelles, 2002) and Tropa de Elite (Jose' Padilha, 2007); documentary movies such as Edif??cio Master (Eduardo Coutinho, 2002) and Santiago (Joao Moreira Salles, 2007) , as well as short movies such as Recife Frio (Kleber Mendonca Filho, 2009) and Eu nao Quero Voltar Sozinho (Daniel Ribeiro, 2010). Taught in English.

  • Romance Lang & Lit
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2163
  • 4 of 14 enrolled
  • TWR 12:30 PM-03:30 PM 06/13 - 07/22
  • OLF,ZTST, FNAR,WKAR

Mitchell Olsen

MARK 20100 | Principles of Marketing
Mitchell Olsen

A study of markets, institutions, and the environment in which business firms operate with attention to the effect these facets, forces, and issues have on the firm's overall marketing strategy.

  • Marketing
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2121
  • 17 of 22 enrolled
  • MW 07:30 PM-09:00 PM 05/30 - 07/22
  • BA02,OLF,

Robert Essig

MARK 30650 | Contemporary Sales Management
Robert Essig

A study of the role of the salesperson and the function of sales management in creating close and productive buyer-seller relationships in the business-to-business domain. Emphases in the course are placed on trends affecting the sales person's role, the effects of the internal and external environment on the selling function, and the value of the salesperson to the firm and society.

  • Marketing
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2042
  • 0 of 0 enrolled
  • TR 07:30 PM-09:45 PM 05/30 - 07/22
  • BAMC,OLF,

Sourav Ghosh

MATH 10360 | Calculus B
Sourav Ghosh

This is the second course of the two-semester Calculus sequence for Life and Social science majors. Calculus B emphasizes the process of problem solving and application of calculus to the natural sciences, and requires students to think deeper about the concepts covered. Students will acquire basic skills needed for quantitative approach to scientific problems. The course introduces the mathematics needed to study change in a quantity. Topics include integration techniques, application of integrals to physics, geometry and ecology, solution of differential equations and their applications, and Taylor series.

  • Mathematics
  • 4.0 credits    CRN 1999
  • 20 of 30 enrolled
  • MW 06:00 PM-08:00 PM 05/30 - 07/22
  • OLF,ZFYS,ZIMB, MATH,WKQR

Paul LeVan

MATH 10360 | Calculus B
Paul LeVan

This is the second course of the two-semester Calculus sequence for Life and Social science majors. Calculus B emphasizes the process of problem solving and application of calculus to the natural sciences, and requires students to think deeper about the concepts covered. Students will acquire basic skills needed for quantitative approach to scientific problems. The course introduces the mathematics needed to study change in a quantity. Topics include integration techniques, application of integrals to physics, geometry and ecology, solution of differential equations and their applications, and Taylor series.

  • Mathematics
  • 4.0 credits    CRN 2000
  • 22 of 30 enrolled
  • TR 10:00 AM-12:00 PM 05/30 - 07/22
  • OLF,ZFYS,ZIMB, MATH,WKQR

Ilija Marchenka

MATH 10560 | Calculus II
Ilija Marchenka

For students in science and engineering. Topics include sets, functions, limits, continuity, derivatives, integrals, and applications. Also covered are transcendental functions and their inverses, infinite sequences and series, parameterized curves in the plane, and polar coordinates.

  • Mathematics
  • 4.0 credits    CRN 2005
  • 18 of 30 enrolled
  • MW 07:00 PM-09:00 PM 05/30 - 07/22
  • OLF,ZFYS, MATH,WKQR

Wern Yeen Yeong

MATH 20550 | Calculus III
Wern Yeen Yeong

A comprehensive treatment of differential and integral calculus of several variables. Topics include space curves, surfaces, functions of several variables, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, line integrals, surface integrals, Stokes theorem, and applications.

  • Mathematics
  • 3.5 credits    CRN 1996
  • 14 of 30 enrolled
  • MW 06:00 PM-08:00 PM 05/30 - 07/22
  • CHSE,NBSE,OLF,ZFTY,ZIMB, MATH,WKQR

Lizda Nazdira Moncada Morales

MATH 20550 | Calculus III
Lizda Nazdira Moncada Morales

A comprehensive treatment of differential and integral calculus of several variables. Topics include space curves, surfaces, functions of several variables, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, line integrals, surface integrals, Stokes theorem, and applications.

  • Mathematics
  • 3.5 credits    CRN 1998
  • 6 of 30 enrolled
  • TR 10:00 AM-12:00 PM 05/30 - 07/22
  • CHSE,NBSE,OLF,ZFTY,ZIMB, MATH,WKQR

Carlos Misael Madrid Padilla

MATH 20580 | Intro Linear Alg and Diff Eqtn
Carlos Misael Madrid Padilla

An introduction to linear algebra and to first-and second-order differential equations. Topics include elementary matrices, LU factorization, QR factorization, the matrix of a linear transformation, change of basis, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, solving first-order differential equations and second-order linear differential equations, and initial value problems. This course is part of a two-course sequence that continues with Math 30650 (325). Credit is not given for both Math 20580 (228) and Math 20610 (221).

  • Mathematics
  • 3.5 credits    CRN 2001
  • 16 of 30 enrolled
  • MW 06:00 PM-08:00 PM 05/30 - 07/22
  • CHSE,OLF,ZIMB, MATH,WKQR

Brian Mulholland

MATH 20580 | Intro Linear Alg and Diff Eqtn
Brian Mulholland

An introduction to linear algebra and to first-and second-order differential equations. Topics include elementary matrices, LU factorization, QR factorization, the matrix of a linear transformation, change of basis, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, solving first-order differential equations and second-order linear differential equations, and initial value problems. This course is part of a two-course sequence that continues with Math 30650 (325). Credit is not given for both Math 20580 (228) and Math 20610 (221).

  • Mathematics
  • 3.5 credits    CRN 2280
  • 8 of 30 enrolled
  • MW 10:00 AM-12:00 PM 05/30 - 07/22
  • CHSE,OLF,ZIMB, MATH,WKQR

Mitchell Olsen

MDMK 20100 | Principles of Marketing
Mitchell Olsen

A study of markets, institutions and the environment in which business firms operate with attention to the effect these facets, forces and issues have on the firm's overall marketing strategy. Open to students in the Digital Marketing Minos.

  • Digital Marketing (MDMK)
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2041
  • 4 of 25 enrolled
  • MW 07:30 PM-09:00 PM 05/30 - 07/22
  • OLF,

Abigail Mancinelli

MDSC 30815 | How to (Not) Lie with Stats
Abigail Mancinelli

Are stay-at-home orders effective during a pandemic? Should parents allow kids to have screen time? What role did demographic shifts play in the 2020 elections? Does the infield shift work? Modern society constantly faces questions that require data, statistics, and other empirical evidence to answer well. But the proliferation of niche media outlets, the rise of fake news, and the increase in academic research retraction makes navigating potential answers to these questions difficult. This course is designed to give students tools to confront this challenge by developing their statistical and information literacy skills. It will demonstrate how data and statistical analyses are susceptible to a wide variety of known and implicit biases, which may ultimately lead consumers of information to make problematic choices. The course will consider this issue from the perspectives of consumers of research as well as researchers themselves. We will discuss effective strategies for reading and interpreting quantitative research while considering the incentives researchers face in producing it. Ultimately, students will complete the class better equipped to evaluate empirical claims made by news outlets, social media, instructors, and their peers. The goal is to encourage students to approach data-driven answers to important questions with appropriate tools rather than blind acceptance or excessive skepticism.

  • Data Science (MDSC)
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2333
  • 1 of 5 enrolled
  • MW 06:30 PM-08:30 PM 05/30 - 07/22
  • OLF,

Catherine Bronson

MEAR 40028 | Classical/Qur'anic Arabic II
Catherine Bronson

The goal of this course is to continue to develop a basic knowledge of the Classical/Qur'anic Arabic, with an emphasis on an overview of grammar and syntax, vocabulary acquisition, and serial readings of Islamic texts. We will read selections from Qur'an, Qur'anic exegeses, hadith (Prophetic tradition), and other related material, such as Islamic legal texts. We will learn how to use Arabic/Islamic bibliographical references (in print and online). The prerequisite for this class is a working knowledge of the Arabic alphabet. The instructor will assess your level before the class begins and make recommendations, as needed. The textbook, Alan Jones' Arabic through the Qur'an, commences with basic syntactic structures.

  • Arabic Language and Literature
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1946
  • 2 of 15 enrolled
  • MTWR 05:30 PM-06:40 PM 06/13 - 07/22
  • ALLN,OLF,SCLN,ZIMB,

Catherine Bronson

MEAR 60028 | Classical/Qur'anic Arabic II
Catherine Bronson

The goal of this course is to continue to develop a basic knowledge of the Classical/Qur'anic Arabic, with an emphasis on an overview of grammar and syntax, vocabulary acquisition, and serial readings of Islamic texts. We will read selections from Qur'an, Qur'anic exegeses, hadith (Prophetic tradition), and other related material, such as Islamic legal texts. We will learn how to use Arabic/Islamic bibliographical references (in print and online). The prerequisite for this class is a working knowledge of the Arabic alphabet. The instructor will assess your level before the class begins and make recommendations, as needed. The textbook, Alan Jones' Arabic through the Qur'an, commences with basic syntactic structures.

  • Arabic Language and Literature
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1977
  • 4 of 15 enrolled
  • MTWR 05:30 PM-06:40 PM 06/13 - 07/22
  • OLF,

Kristopher Muir

MGTO 20100 | Principles of Management
Kristopher Muir

You were likely born in an organization. Right now you are being taught in an organization. One day you will work in an organization. You will rely on organizations to obtain basic necessities, to participate in activities, and for many facets of life. Organizations emerge because individuals can?t or don?t want to accomplish their goals alone. This course will explore topics of strategy, networks, culture, teams, motivation, influence, decision making, innovation, and leadership.

  • Management & Organization
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2113
  • 22 of 36 enrolled
  • TR 08:00 PM-09:55 PM 06/13 - 07/22
  • BA02,OLF,ZCSC,

James O'Brien

MSA 60111 | Federal Taxation
James O'Brien

The purpose of the course is to provide a broad introduction to taxation. The course is designed to prepare students for the Taxes and Business Strategy Course. Major topics to be covered in this first tax course include: types of taxes, tax rates, taxes and present values, tax planning, income from business operations, individuals (basics), investment planning, nontaxable transactions and tax considerations for property acquisitions.

  • Master of Science Accountancy
  • 1.5 credits    CRN 2123
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • MTWRF 08:00 AM-12:00 PM 07/25 - 07/29
  • OLF,

Keith Urtel

MSA 60112 | Intermediate Accounting I
Keith Urtel

This course is the first of a two course sequence that cover intermediate level financial reporting topics. Topics covered across the two courses include: economic and institutional setting for financial reporting, accrual accounting and income determination, role of financial information in valuation, role of financial information in contracting, receivables, inventories, long-lived assets, financial instruments as liabilities, leases, pensions and post-retirement benefits, income tax reporting, and owners' equity.

  • Master of Science Accountancy
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 2124
  • 10 of 15 enrolled
  • TBA 06/13 - 06/18 |MTR 04:00 PM-05:30 PM 06/20 - 06/23 |S 04:00 PM-07:00 PM 06/25 - 06/25 |MTR 04:00 PM-05:30 PM 06/27 - 06/30 |S 04:00 PM-07:00 PM 07/02 - 07/02
  • OLF,

Keith Urtel

MSA 60122 | Intermediate Accounting II
Keith Urtel

This course is the first of a two course sequence that cover intermediate level financial reporting topics. Topics covered across the two courses include: economic and institutional setting for financial reporting, accrual accounting and income determination, role of financial information in valuation, role of financial information in contracting, receivables, inventories, long-lived assets, financial instruments as liabilities, leases, pensions and post-retirement benefits, income tax reporting, and owners' equity.

  • Master of Science Accountancy
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 2125
  • 10 of 15 enrolled
  • TWR 04:00 PM-05:30 PM 07/05 - 07/07 |MW 04:00 PM-05:30 PM 07/11 - 07/13 |S 03:00 PM-07:00 PM 07/16 - 07/16 |MTW 04:00 PM-05:30 PM 07/18 - 07/20 |MW 04:00 PM-05:30 PM 07/25 - 07/27 |S 03:00 PM-07:00 PM 07/30 - 07/30
  • OLF,

Kenneth Milani

MSA 60123 | Strategic Cost Management
Kenneth Milani

This course builds on and reinforces concepts from the introductory accounting courses with applications in accounting and strategic cost management settings. The course is designed to help students become discriminating producers and users of strategic cost accounting information for decision-making. The course demonstrates how cost management analysts can add value to their organizations by providing recommendations to improve profitability of products, services, customers, and value streams. The course also focuses on measuring causes or drivers of costs, and making recommendations about capacity, quality, and time.

  • Master of Science Accountancy
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 2126
  • 10 of 15 enrolled
  • MTRF 08:00 AM-10:45 AM 06/20 - 06/24 |S 08:00 AM-09:15 AM 06/25 - 06/25 |M 09:30 AM-10:45 AM 06/27 - 06/27 |WRF 08:00 AM-10:45 AM 06/29 - 07/01 |MTW 08:00 AM-10:45 AM 07/04 - 07/06 |R 08:00 AM-09:15 AM 07/07 - 07/07 |F 09:30 AM-10:45 AM 07/08 - 07/08
  • OLF,

James O'Brien

MSA 60141 | Federal Taxation - Immersion
James O'Brien

The purpose of the course is to provide a broad introduction to taxation. The course is designed to prepare students for the Taxes and Business Strategy Course. Major topics to be covered in this first tax course include: types of taxes, tax rates, taxes and present values, tax planning, income from business operations, individuals (basics), investment planning, nontaxable transactions and tax considerations for property acquisitions.

  • Master of Science Accountancy
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 2127
  • 10 of 15 enrolled
  • MTWRF 01:00 PM-05:00 PM 06/06 - 06/17 |TBA 06/06 - 06/11
  • OLF,

Keith Urtel

MSA 60151 | Audit & Assurance Service
Keith Urtel

This course provides a conceptual framework of the principles, standards, and procedures underlying financial audits. Topics covered include: generally accepted auditing standards, materiality and audit risk thresholds, issuance of the audit report, the audit process and documentation, internal control in a financial statement audit, analytical procedures, and auditor's legal liability, including the auditor's responsibility for fraud.

  • Master of Science Accountancy
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 2128
  • 12 of 15 enrolled
  • MWR 02:30 PM-03:45 PM 07/11 - 07/14 |M 01:00 PM-03:45 PM 07/18 - 07/18 |TW 02:30 PM-03:45 PM 07/19 - 07/20 |MW 02:30 PM-03:45 PM 07/25 - 07/27 |F 01:00 PM-03:45 PM 07/29 - 07/29
  • OLF,

James O'Brien, Janet O'Tousa

PCSE 00401 | SSO - Accounting
James O'Brien, Janet O'Tousa

From Wall Street to Main Street, accounting shapes and informs all aspects of life. This accounting course introduces students to fundamental accounting concepts and processes in addition to the important roles that CPAs (certified public accountants) play with every type of organization, from the local flower shop to the multi-national pharmaceutical company. The framework for this innovative course consists of an overview of accounting concepts and techniques, financial statements, and case studies based on current events, such as proposed changes to U.S. tax law and European Union fines on Apple Computer. The course enables students to see how CPAs protect investors, influence public policy, analyze businesses, and advise companies, ranging from start-ups to Fortune 500 companies. Students will engage in interactive exercises that address fundamental accounting techniques, financial statement interpretation, tax planning, and current tax policy issues. Through a mix of class discussions and recorded or digital presentations by accounting professionals, business leaders, or entrepreneurs, the course will also demonstrate the infinite opportunities that accounting majors have in public accounting, for-profit businesses, non-profit organizations, and academia. During the first week, students learn about the accounting profession and explore the basics of financial and tax accounting through exercises, presentations, and cases. During week two, students continue their exposure to accountancy concepts and applications and examine the role of CPAs in non-profit organizations. In addition, students will hear from additional guests who discuss trade-offs in tax policy. The week concludes with electronic small group presentations regarding tax policy issues.

  • Pre-College Summer Experience
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1745
  • 17 of 40 enrolled
  • MTWRF 09:00 AM-04:00 PM 07/18 - 07/29
  • OLF,

Connie Mick

PCSE 00404 | SSO - Confronting Poverty
Connie Mick

Mahatma Ghandi says that poverty is the worst form of violence. Jesus says that the poor will always be with us and that they will inherit the kingdom of God. Ronald Reagan says we fought the war on poverty and poverty won. So many religious and political leaders have commented on poverty. What does all this mean? And what should you do about it? In this course, we will address that enduring question: Why are people poor? We will take an interdisciplinary look at poverty to try to understand the forces that maintain poverty and the forces that resist it. From sustainability to social entrepreneurship, from economics to creative writing, we will explore a variety of mindsets and methods for understanding, representing, and assessing poverty. But we will do more than theorize about poverty. We will also engage personal stories to understand how poverty persists and is resisted on an individual level. We will meet virtually with community leaders who do anti-poverty work and local residents who live in poverty. We will explore poverty through statistics and stories???the facts and the lived experience of people in poverty. This framework will help guide our journey: Definitions. What is poverty? Causes. Why are people poor? Consequences. Who is poor? Privilege. Who isn't poor? Rhetoric. How does the media represent poverty? Solutions. What should we do about poverty? In this course, we will gain a deeper understanding of the public and private programs and institutions that address poverty on the local, national, and global level. We will also gain a deeper understanding of what has worked and what hasn't in domestic and international efforts to create lasting change to reduce poverty. Finally, you will be encouraged to discern how you are called to address poverty in your personal and professional life, exploring individual actions and careers that align with your skills and interests related to poverty, whether that is through the study of medicine, law, politics, social work, business, theology, psychology, economics, English, engineering, or any other field. By the end of this course, you should have a sense of the history of poverty and of how poverty could become history.

  • Pre-College Summer Experience
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1748
  • 14 of 40 enrolled
  • MTWRF 09:00 AM-04:00 PM 07/18 - 07/29
  • OLF,

Theodore Mandell

PCSE 00406 | SSO - Film Production
Theodore Mandell

Film and video production can take many forms, from television news production to commercial production to documentary and feature filmmaking. At Notre Dame, the Film, Television, and Theatre department teaches production as an art form. Not only do we prepare undergraduates to enter the industry with a solid technical background, but most importantly, we challenge students to be creative and to infuse their work with a personal vision that is characteristic of all artists. The production process is communal. No one person can produce a film. It's a group effort, and the Film Production Track of Summer Scholars allows students to work closely with their peers as crew members and creative collaborators, learning from each other and making friendships which last well beyond their two weeks on campus. Working together remotely, students will study film history, learn the craft and aesthetics of writing, shooting, and editing films, meet Notre Dame alumni working in the film industry, and work creatively in groups, to produce and direct their own short films which we'll screen at the end of the two week session in our very own online Summer Scholars Film Festival.

  • Pre-College Summer Experience
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1750
  • 11 of 35 enrolled
  • MTWRF 09:00 AM-04:00 PM 07/18 - 07/29
  • OLF,

Darlene Hampton

PCSE 00408 | SSO - Identity & Pop Culture
Darlene Hampton

Do you know your Hogwart???s house? Have you ever thought about how the media you consume influences your views on race, politics, or sexuality? Do you want to play video games, share your favorite songs, and analyze representations in your favorite TV shows? Do you have the ability to critique something you love? If so, then this class is for you. This class introduces students to cultural studies frameworks such as critical race theory, intersectionality, and theories of representation to address questions like: What is popular culture? How does it impact how we see ourselves, others, and the world around us? Do representations matter? What is identity and how is it formed? What is "the media" and how does it impact our understanding of different aspects of identity such as race, gender, sexual orientation, socioeconomic class? How do our own personal values and ideas influence the kinds of media we consume and what we take from it? Can the popular culture transform the values of a person or society? Can we love something and still be critical of it? As a class, we will consume, discuss, analyze, and create examples of popular culture in order to explore the relationship between what we often see as "just entertainment" and the very systems and beliefs that make up society and culture as we know it. Students will have the opportunity to collaborate, research, and share examples and experiences with their peers.

  • Pre-College Summer Experience
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 2251
  • 16 of 30 enrolled
  • MTWRF 09:00 AM-04:00 PM 07/18 - 07/29
  • OLF,ZIMB,

T. Mark Olsen, David Veselik

PCSE 00410 | SSO - Life Sciences
T. Mark Olsen, David Veselik

Students in the Cancer Biology track will actively engage in the study of cancer by first reviewing the scientific literature on hallmarks of cancer, then characterizing specific human tumor cell lines to propose treatment modalities and future research. Students will have the opportunity to learn about cutting edge cancer research being conducted in several Notre Dame research laboratories, interacting with ND cancer researchers via virtual laboratory tours and live Q&A sessions. Student research teams will have the opportunity to present on cancer hallmarks and give their findings regarding characterization of their assigned cancer cell line. Although the course will focus on the fascinating topic of cancer biology, our course will foster collaborative problem-solving and experiential understanding of science by actively involving student research teams in the design and analysis of actual data, discussion of findings in the primary literature and development of scientific presentation skills.

  • Pre-College Summer Experience
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1754
  • 19 of 45 enrolled
  • MTWRF 09:00 AM-04:00 PM 07/18 - 07/29
  • OLF,

Michael Macaluso

PCSE 00411 | SSO - Literature: Hope&Faith
Michael Macaluso

Literature has the power to shape our inner lives as well as our capacity to be and act in the world. C.S. Lewis has said the arts, and hence by extension, the written word, allow us through our compassion and empathy to reach beyond ourselves to heal the loneliness and dangers of self-absorption: "In love, in virtue, in the pursuit of knowledge, and in the reception of the arts, we are doing this." This literature course takes two tracks. In the morning session, we consider the human and moral dimensions of literature through an examination of various "digital dystopias," texts that explore the effects and the power of digital media and technology on our lives. We will supplement our reading of popular, young adult literature by watching a documentary about adolescents and digital media as well as a TV show (like Netflix's Black Mirror) or a movie (like Tron: Legacy or The Hunger Games). The afternoon session will offer an examination of contemporary authors (i.e. Wendell Berry, Ta-Nehisi Coates, Chris Hayes and others) to explore the dynamic relationship between literature and life, and particularly the role literature plays in allowing us to imagine community and to seek justice, particularly for the disenfranchised and uprooted among us. Taken together, the course as a whole, argues for individuals to work for the common good rather than to focus on individual wants and needs. In several class sessions, we take these discussions "into the field" (and back) by visiting several community organizations that serve the lonely and disenfranchised. In this way, we hope to broaden students' understanding of the potential literature has to not only broaden one's view of the world but call one to action.

  • Pre-College Summer Experience
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1757
  • 19 of 35 enrolled
  • MTWRF 09:00 AM-04:00 PM 07/18 - 07/29
  • OLF,

Jason Kelly

PCSE 00412 | SSO - Making Headlines
Jason Kelly

With the proliferation of digital media, the ways journalists reach their audiences are changing, but the profession's fundamental principles remain steadfast. The Journalism track will offer an introduction to ethical principles and the opportunity to put them into practice. Students will learn by doing - reporting, interviewing, writing, editing and broadcasting on assignments that reflect the variety of stories that journalists produce every day. That experience will be supplemented with insights from working professionals and the study of award-winning work. Notre Dame's Gallivan Program in Journalism, Ethics, and Democracy provides students with a foundation in the field's enduring values, while offering first-hand multimedia experience to develop the skills necessary to thrive in an evolving industry. Initiative, efficiency and creativity will be cultivated through independent fieldwork. Collaborative discussions about student work will generate feedback that nurtures the news judgment and storytelling skill that form the basis of good journalism across all media platforms.

  • Pre-College Summer Experience
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1758
  • 11 of 35 enrolled
  • MTWRF 09:00 AM-04:00 PM 07/18 - 07/29
  • OLF,

Robert Essig, Mitchell Olsen

PCSE 00413 | SSO - Marketing Common Good
Robert Essig, Mitchell Olsen

One of the fundamental tasks of a business is to understand the needs of its customers and create products and services that will satisfy those customers. Some firms uncover the needs of its customers through marketing research (e.g., Kellogg) while others may create new products based on their vision (e.g., Apple). At its core, marketing deals with activities and processes for creating, communicating, delivering, and exchanging offerings that have value for its customers. In one-half of this marketing course, we will help students understand how firms generate and implement marketing strategies to retain customers. Students will explore the basics of the marketing discipline through a variety of presentations, small group exercises, and case studies. Students will also develop a comprehensive marketing plan for a suggested, local non-profit organization. While marketing has a positive impact on corporations in terms of sales and profits, scholars have also been exploring the impact of marketing on the society as a whole. The societal perspective of marketing emphasizes consumer welfare. Marketing leads to a better standard of living and a socially beneficial distribution of goods and services. We will explore how Marketing can be a force for the Common Good, by looking at how effective it has been in a variety of social contexts such as in childhood obesity and the non-profit sector. Thus, a second part of the course will explore the larger issues of marketing's place in society as a force for common good.

  • Pre-College Summer Experience
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1763
  • 10 of 40 enrolled
  • MTWRF 09:00 AM-04:00 PM 07/18 - 07/29
  • OLF,

Nicole Woods

PCSE 00414 | SSO - Modern Art
Nicole Woods

The course is designed to explore the history of art created in mid-19th century Western Europe to mid-20th century North America (roughly 1860-1965). Through a thematic overview of the period, as well as a series of specific case studies, we will examine figures, movements and practices from the period of French Impressionism to the Pop Art Movement, paying special attention to the social, political, and historical contexts in which they arose. Focusing on painting, sculpture, and photography, we will also trace the transformation of Paris as the artistic center of the 19th century, and New York City's emergence as the site of 20th century high modernism. Along the way, we will look at other movements of this time period, including Cubism, German Expressionism, Constructivism, Surrealism, and Abstract Expressionism. We will consider the rise of mass-media technologies like radio, broadcast television, and film in relation to artists' engagement with new technologies. Examining industrialization, urbanization, and two global wars, we will come to understand how artistic developments of this period fundamentally reinvented the ways in which artists understood and captured their world. We will take our classroom on virtual visits to major museums in Chicago, New York, London, and Paris. And we will host a guest curator from the Albright-Knox Gallery and a local designer in the course of our two weeks together. Students who take this course will walk away with not only a deep sense of key artists and cultural achievements in modern art, but an appreciation for the complexities of the artistic process as well.

  • Pre-College Summer Experience
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1923
  • 11 of 40 enrolled
  • MTWRF 09:00 AM-04:00 PM 07/18 - 07/29
  • OLF,ZIMB,

Patrick Clauss

PCSE 00416 | SSO - Public Speaking &Debate
Patrick Clauss

This track emphasizes public speaking and debate to help you develop communication skills that will enhance your academic and personal lives. We work within the format of policy arguments, a mode where speakers present detailed arguments about significant, contemporary issues and topics. Such arguments require strong research, critical thinking, and writing and speaking skills, skills you will use after this course in a myriad of areas including not only your college coursework but life in general. Class lessons and activities offer opportunities to hone your public speaking skills through short, informative and persuasive speeches. We will also watch clips from film and television programs that illustrate points raised in class. Also, to help you develop arguments for your speeches, we will work with Notre Dame's extensive library holdings. You will learn how to use a university library's electronic databases. Finally, on the last day of class you will argue for or against a resolution you and/or your classmates have crafted. Whether you are an experienced speaker or have never delivered a speech before, all you need is the desire to develop as a critical thinker and effective persuader.

  • Pre-College Summer Experience
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1764
  • 14 of 30 enrolled
  • MTWRF 09:00 AM-04:00 PM 07/18 - 07/29
  • OLF,

David Gasperetti

PCSE 00417 | SSO - Russia & the West
David Gasperetti

Over the past 100 years, Westerners have spent considerable time analyzing Russia, but what about the reverse: How do Russians view the West? And just as importantly, what has shaped their opinion of us? As one might expect given Russia's long, rich, and turbulent history, there are no simple answers to these questions. At times, Russians have ardently imitated what they thought were the unparalleled virtues of Western society; at others, they have just as firmly rejected Western influence as antithetical to their most cherished traditional values. Underpinning this ambivalent response is the notion of a "Russian Soul" that sets Russians apart from Americans and other Europeans. If such a thing even exists, can we define it? In this track, we will use an interdisciplinary approach to uncover the people, events, and ideas that have shaped the modern Russian psyche and how it regards the West. Works of Russian literature, film, and art will be supported by eyewitness accounts and readings from the disciplines of history and political science. The historical sweep of our study will range from the reign of Peter the Great (1682-1725), which marked Russia's first widespread engagement with the West, to the present. Major topics include Peter the Great's Westernizing reforms and their legacy, Russia's Age of Enlightenment, the genesis of the concept "Russian Soul," the Westernizers vs. Slavophiles debate, the 1917 Revolution and its aftermath, the Cold War of the 1940s-1980s, and the post-Soviet (contemporary) period.

  • Pre-College Summer Experience
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1924
  • 12 of 40 enrolled
  • MTWRF 09:00 AM-04:00 PM 07/18 - 07/29
  • OLF,ZIMB,

Jason Springs

PCSE 00418 | SSO - Restorative Justice
Jason Springs

The United States incarcerates more of its citizens than any other country in the world. Though long recognized for excessively incarcerating poor people, recent decades have exposed savage disproportionalities in the rates by which the U.S. imprisons its Black and Brown citizens. Scholars now describe the U.S. prison-industrial complex as a caste system that discriminates by race and ethnicity???what legal scholar, Michelle Alexander, has famously termed the new Jim Crow. This seminar examines the potential of restorative justice ethics, practices, and community-led initiatives to challenge, and potentially transform, the structurally racist features that form the retributive culture of the U.S. justice system, and its devastating impact upon minority and marginalized neighborhoods. Restorative justice is both an ethical framework and a range of community-based and victim-centered justice, healing, and peacebuilding practices. Implemented widely in international contexts, there it often informs truth and reconciliation efforts in the wake of violent conflict (e.g. truth commissions in South Africa, Chile, Argentina, Uganda, among others). In North American contexts, restorative justice is typically practiced as measures that "divert" alleged offenders from a standard course through the justice system by funneling them into alternative justice practices and programs. On this understanding, restorative justice paths may be both less harshly punitive, and aim to repair harm caused to victims, communities - and even offenders - by destructive conflict, violence, and crime. However, when deployed for primarily diversionary purposes, restorative justice initiatives fail to address the ways that the U.S. justice system, itself, manifests structural and cultural forms of violence (e.g. the criminalization of people of color, socio-economic inequalities, and the shame, stigma, and fragmentation that deteriorate community bonds and relationships). Can restorative justice ethics and practices respond effectively - and transformatively - to the new Jim Crow? We will explore answers to this question through several steps: 1) understanding the history and character of the "new Jim Crow," 2) by investigating restorative justice ethics, and how they form a distinctive theory of justice, 3) examining cases and contexts in which restorative justice practices are implemented, and 4) assessing the impact of those initiatives on structural and cultural forms of violence inscribed there.

  • Pre-College Summer Experience
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1765
  • 6 of 40 enrolled
  • MTWRF 09:00 AM-04:00 PM 07/18 - 07/29
  • OLF,

Christine Venter

PCSE 00419 | SSO - The Law
Christine Venter

From Capitol Hill to the county courthouse, the workings of law in American society have shaped, and continue to shape, our way of life. The Law course exposes Summer Scholars students to the many facets of the American legal system. The groundwork for this exciting track will be laid in the exploration of the United States Constitution as well as current legal issues. Students participate in an active investigation of the court system, from both a civil and criminal law perspective. Through a combination of class lectures delivered by dynamic instructors and expert guest lecturers, the class also investigates various areas of substantive law, including tort law and intellectual property law. During the first week, students are introduced to the American legal system, the weight of legal authority, the various areas of the law, and what lawyers actually do. Students explore human rights law, trafficking, and immigration and forms of discrimination. Students research and present on a constitutional issue. Guest speakers include an immigration lawyer and a human rights lawyer. During the second week, students delve into the Constitution and the Supreme Court as well as the appellate process.

  • Pre-College Summer Experience
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1766
  • 12 of 45 enrolled
  • MTWRF 09:00 AM-04:00 PM 07/18 - 07/29
  • OLF,

Jennifer Huynh

PCSE 00421 | SSO - Immigrant America
Jennifer Huynh

Nearly one in four people is an immigrant or child of immigrants in the United States. This course offers a critical examination of what it means to be an immigrant or child of immigrants through interdisciplinary sources including memoirs, blogs, art, and popular journalism. Since the liberalization of immigration policy in 1965, immigrants from Latin America and Asia are becoming an increasing and emergent demographic of American society. In major American cities such as Los Angeles and New York, they comprise over 50% of the population. This course focuses on how immigrants and the children of immigrants experience the United States. How are immigrants changing the US racial and ethnic structure? How do their experiences differ given varying legal statuses? How is the second generation becoming American? We will explore these questions through family, media representation, religion, education, dating, and sexuality. Students will participate in a virtual service-learning opportunity related to migration and social justice, and learn skills in quantitative and qualitative methodologies.

  • Pre-College Summer Experience
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 2250
  • 9 of 30 enrolled
  • MTWRF 09:00 AM-04:00 PM 07/18 - 07/29
  • OLF,ZIMB,

Joshua Seachris

PHIL 20101 | Introduction to Philosophy
Joshua Seachris

A general introduction to philosophy, which may cover introductory topics in either topically or historically, with a focus on introducing students to some of the perennial problems and texts of philosophy. Specific course content varies by semester and by instructor. See https://philosophy.nd.edu/courses/1st-courses-in-philosophy/ for further details of specific sections offered this semester.

  • Philosophy
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2038
  • 24 of 25 enrolled
  • TR 10:00 AM-11:30 AM 05/30 - 07/22
  • OLF,ZIMB, PHIL,WKFP

Trevor Anderson

PHIL 20101 | Introduction to Philosophy
Trevor Anderson

A general introduction to philosophy, which may cover introductory topics in either topically or historically, with a focus on introducing students to some of the perennial problems and texts of philosophy. Specific course content varies by semester and by instructor. See https://philosophy.nd.edu/courses/1st-courses-in-philosophy/ for further details of specific sections offered this semester.

  • Philosophy
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2039
  • 23 of 25 enrolled
  • MW 06:00 PM-08:00 PM 05/30 - 07/22
  • OLF,ZIMB, PHIL,WKFP

Justin Christy

PHIL 20454 | Philosophy as a Way of Life
Justin Christy

How does philosophical reasoning interact with lived practice? What is the relationship between a philosopher's metaphysical views and their ethical commitments? Can philosophy help you live a better life? In this course, we will look at a range of ancient and contemporary positions on questions like these. We will seek to understand a number of historical approaches to the philosophical life not only through in-depth reading and discussion of texts from the philosophical traditions in question, but also by trying out each tradition's distinctive practices for ourselves. The specific topics and philosophical traditions covered are subject to change. For the most up-to-date information, see the course description at https://philosophy.nd.edu/courses/2nd-courses-in-philosophy/

  • Philosophy
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2062
  • 23 of 25 enrolled
  • MW 12:00 PM-02:00 PM 05/30 - 07/22
  • OLF, PHI2,WKSP

Tobias Flattery

PHIL 20632 | Robot Ethics
Tobias Flattery

Robots or "autonomous systems" play an ever-increasing role in many areas, from weapons systems and driverless cars to health care and consumer services. As a result, it is ever more important to ask whether it makes any sense to speak of such systems' behaving ethically and how we can build into their programming what some call "ethics modules." After a brief technical introduction to the field, this course will approach these questions through contemporary philosophical literature on robot ethics and through popular media, including science fiction text and video.

  • Philosophy
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2040
  • 22 of 22 enrolled
  • MR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM 05/30 - 07/22
  • OLF,ZIMB, PHI2,WKSP

Charlene Brecevic

PHIL 20655 | Tech and Innovation Ethics
Charlene Brecevic

This course will closely consider the ethical responsibilities inherent in the process of technological innovation from the perspective of the innovator. Innovation is here broadly framed as ethical and social intervention in the life of users and society rather than merely technical invention. Topics covered include the nature of responsibility, values in design, the roles of regulation and of business models, and cases from social media, AI, and robotics.

  • Philosophy
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2045
  • 25 of 25 enrolled
  • TR 06:00 PM-07:30 PM 05/30 - 07/22
  • OLF, PHI2,WKSP

Charlene Brecevic

PHIL 20655 | Tech and Innovation Ethics
Charlene Brecevic

This course will closely consider the ethical responsibilities inherent in the process of technological innovation from the perspective of the innovator. Innovation is here broadly framed as ethical and social intervention in the life of users and society rather than merely technical invention. Topics covered include the nature of responsibility, values in design, the roles of regulation and of business models, and cases from social media, AI, and robotics.

  • Philosophy
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2046
  • 12 of 25 enrolled
  • TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM 05/30 - 07/22
  • OLF, PHI2,WKSP

Quynh Lan Nguyen

PHYS 10240 | Elementary Cosmology
Quynh Lan Nguyen

An elective course for students planning to major in the arts and letters or business. It is designed to acquaint the non-mathematically inclined student with the most important discoveries in physics of the last few decades and how they have altered our perceptions of the origin and structure of the universe. This course examines such questions as: "Where did the universe come from?" "Why do scientists feel sure that it was born in a cosmic fireball called the Big Bang?" and "Where did the Big Bang itself come from?" This is a reading-intensive course based on popularizations of science written for the curious and intelligent layperson. The emphasis will be on class discussion of the readings. One book report and a term paper are required in addition to examinations.

  • Physics
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2007
  • 12 of 25 enrolled
  • MTR 07:00 PM-08:30 PM 05/30 - 07/22
  • OLF,ZFYS, NASC,WKST

Michael Hoffman

POLS 30482 | Identity Politics
Michael Hoffman

Identity politics has recently regained attention as a major force in political behavior. In this course, we will examine the features of identity politics that bear on individuals' political preferences and decisions. Using both historical and contemporary examples, we will analyze the role of identity considerations in electoral behavior, protest, and partisanship, among other areas. Some of the identity categories studied will be race, gender, and religious affiliation. The course includes cases both within the American context and international comparisons.

  • Political Science
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2033
  • 15 of 15 enrolled
  • MTR 02:15 PM-03:45 PM 05/30 - 07/22
  • CSTE,IBCL,OLF,ZIMB,

Abigail Mancinelli

POLS 30815 | How to (Not) Lie with Stats
Abigail Mancinelli

Are stay-at-home orders effective during a pandemic? Should parents allow kids to have screen time? What role did demographic shifts play in the 2020 elections? Does the infield shift work? Modern society constantly faces questions that require data, statistics, and other empirical evidence to answer well. But the proliferation of niche media outlets, the rise of fake news, and the increase in academic research retraction makes navigating potential answers to these questions difficult. This course is designed to give students tools to confront this challenge by developing their statistical and information literacy skills. It will demonstrate how data and statistical analyses are susceptible to a wide variety of known and implicit biases, which may ultimately lead consumers of information to make problematic choices. The course will consider this issue from the perspectives of consumers of research as well as researchers themselves. We will discuss effective strategies for reading and interpreting quantitative research while considering the incentives researchers face in producing it. Ultimately, students will complete the class better equipped to evaluate empirical claims made by news outlets, social media, instructors, and their peers. The goal is to encourage students to approach data-driven answers to important questions with appropriate tools rather than blind acceptance or excessive skepticism.

  • Political Science
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2103
  • 12 of 25 enrolled
  • MW 06:30 PM-08:30 PM 05/30 - 07/22
  • OLF,ZIMB,

Bradley Gibson

PSY 10000 | Introductory Psychology
Bradley Gibson

A broad coverage of the methods and findings that characterize scientific psychology, including a description of historical and recent developments in the areas of learning and motivation; perceptual, cognitive, and physiological processes; social, personality, and child development; and abnormal behavior and clinical treatment. Open to first-year students only.

  • Psychology
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2014
  • 31 of 31 enrolled
  • TWR 07:00 PM-09:05 PM 06/13 - 07/22
  • ALSS,OLF,ZFYS, SOSC,WKSS

Bradley Gibson

PSY 30100 | Statistics Behavioral Science
Bradley Gibson

An introduction to the analysis and evaluation of experimental data, with particular emphasis on measures of central tendency, variability, and covariability and their relationship to psychological theory and explanation.

  • Psychology
  • 4.0 credits    CRN 1322
  • 12 of 20 enrolled
  • MTWR 12:30 PM-02:40 PM 06/13 - 07/22
  • OLF,ZUG2, WKQR

Anre Venter, Theodore Mandell

PSY 30635 | Drunk on Film
Anre Venter, Theodore Mandell

Alcohol Use Disorder is a chronic relapsing brain disease. But when presented on screen, it's entertainment. Why do we laugh, why do we cry, why do we emulate fictional characters whose drinking habits result in a life of debilitating addiction? From James Bond to Jonah Hill, the psychology and seduction of alcohol on film, television, and online will be analyzed. Furthermore, what is the relationship between the manner in which alcohol use/abuse is presented on screen and the manner in which alcohol is used and abused on, for example, college campuses? Surveying recent film history, we will examine how alcohol is used in story structure, as a character flaw or strength, and as a narrative device in the story arc of films across multiple film genres, (action/adventure, comedy, romance, etc). Why do characters drink, where do they drink, and how does the result of their "getting drunk" advance the narrative? We'll also look at non-fiction films that tackle issues of addiction, as a way of comparing character development in Hollywood films to the results of this same behavior in everyday life. Film materials will include weekly screenings outside of class, and academic articles relating to portrayal and analysis of alcohol use in film and television, including the business of marketing alcohol in print and television advertising. From the psychological perspective we will discuss the topic and process of social influence and how the presence of others influences our behavior. Questions of interest will include the following: what are the mechanisms by which group influence unfolds? How and why might we be persuaded? Does the manner, and if so how, in which alcohol use is portrayed in movies and the media reflect the processes and principles of social influence? Readings will include chapters on social influence, persuasion and academic articles evaluating the manner in which alcohol is portrayed and advertised and the effect this has on alcohol consumption. In addition, issues of addiction will be discussed - from understanding the basis of addiction to examining the efficacy of addiction treatment.

  • Psychology
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2016
  • 27 of 30 enrolled
  • MTW 04:30 PM-07:00 PM 06/06 - 07/08
  • OLF,ZIMB, WKIN

Dawn Gondoli

PSY 43363 | Body Image
Dawn Gondoli

In this seminar, we will explore the biological, psychosocial (including peers and family), and cultural factors influencing body image. We will explore impacts of "fitspo" and body esteem messages, and examine alternative means of reducing risk of body dissatisfaction (e.g., self and identity; self-compassion; gratitude). Potential connections between body image and disordered eating will be examined, including analysis of "classical" and contemporary theoretical models. Both basic and applied (i.e., intervention) research will be incorporated, and a lifespan approach will be utilized, examining body image during childhood, adolescence and midlife.

  • Psychology
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2009
  • 20 of 20 enrolled
  • TWR 07:00 PM-09:05 PM 06/13 - 07/22
  • OLF,ZIMB,

Claire Reising

ROFR 10101 | Beginning French I
Claire Reising

For students who have had no previous exposure to French. An introductory, first-year language sequence with equal focus on the four skills: speaking, listening, reading and writing. An appreciation for French culture is also encouraged through readings and discussions. This course is to be followed by ROFR 10102.

  • French
  • 4.0 credits    CRN 2311
  • 5 of 15 enrolled
  • MTWR 07:00 PM-09:30 PM 06/27 - 07/22
  • OLF,OLH,

Anne Schaefer

ROFR 20201 | Intermediate French I
Anne Schaefer

ROFR 20201 course fulfills the language requirement. This is a third-semester second-year language sequence, with equal focus on oral and written production. It includes a review of basic grammar and then transitions into more difficult features of French. Students learn to discuss and write about French cultural topics, current events, and literary texts. This course is to be followed by ROFR 20202. Students must have a Language Exam Score between 301 and 350 to enroll in this class. Students who do not meet the prerequisites need to contact department DUS for approval.

  • French
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2111
  • 7 of 16 enrolled
  • TWR 12:00 PM-02:00 PM 06/13 - 07/22
  • LANG,MESE,OLF,SCLN,ZFTY,

Alison Rice

ROFR 63050 | French Graduate Reading
Alison Rice

A course designed to prepare students for the Graduate Reading Examination. No prerequisites. Open to undergraduate students by permission of the chair.

  • French
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2049
  • 16 of 16 enrolled
  • TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM 05/30 - 07/12
  • OLF,ZIMB,

Alessia Blad-Miller

ROIT 10101 | Beginning Italian I
Alessia Blad-Miller

Welcome to ROIT 10101 - Beginning Italian I Online Course. This course focuses on developing student's competency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. ROIT 10101 will be conducted entirely online. You will not need to be physically present on campus in order to be a student in this class. You will need to have access to a computer with a microphone, headphones, a video camera, and high-speed internet. We will use the latest edition of the Textbook Sentieri published by Vista Higher Learning and the Supersite. You will need to purchase the access to the Supersite with your textbook. Since the course will be held entirely online, it requires students to work independently and follow a very structured syllabus. Each day you will be involved in a variety of online tasks such as reading, listening, completing exercises, posting writing assignments, and recording responses on the Supersite. Twice a week during our virtual classroom time, you will meet in real-time with your instructors and a small number of classmates. Your instructors will be available for online office hours twice a week

  • Italian
  • 4.0 credits    CRN 2051
  • 10 of 16 enrolled
  • OLF,ZIMB,

Tiziana Serafini

ROIT 10102 | Beginning Italian II
Tiziana Serafini

Welcome to ROIT 1102 - Beginning Italian II (Summer Online). This course focuses on developing student's competency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. ROIT 10102 will be conducted entirely online, meeting both asynchronously and synchronously. You will not need to be physically present on campus in order to be a student in this class. You will need to have access to a computer with a microphone, headphones, a video camera, and high-speed internet. We will use the latest edition of the Textbook Sentieri published by Vista Higher Learning and the Supersite. You will need to purchase the access to the Supersite with your textbook. Since the course will be held online, it requires students to work independently and follow a very structured syllabus. Each day you will be involved in a variety of online tasks such as speaking, reading, listening, completing exercises, posting writing assignments in Canvas and recording responses on the Supersite and Flipgrid. Twice a week during our virtual classroom time, you will meet in real-time with your instructors and a small number of classmates. Your instructors will be available for online office hours twice a week.

  • Italian
  • 4.0 credits    CRN 2052
  • 7 of 16 enrolled
  • OLF,ZIMB,

Tiziana Serafini, Suzanne Shanahan

ROIT 10180 | Italian LTBC
Tiziana Serafini, Suzanne Shanahan

This is a one-credit interdisciplinary and experiential learning course offered through Summer Online in June 2022 to qualified Notre Dame students. This course prepares students to serve as language coaches for immigrants in Italy participating in the Italian for Immigrants non-credit training program. Students will tackle issues of immigration and foreign language pedagogy and will learn how to use their language knowledge for service to the underprivileged. This course is open to all language students who have reached a 102 level in their foreign language. Precedence will be given to students of Italian. Approximately 4 Notre Dame students will be hired to participate in this course. Students who are not hired will be prepared to support language training for immigrants.

  • Italian
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 2083
  • 7 of 10 enrolled
  • TR 11:00 AM-12:15 PM 05/30 - 06/20
  • OLF,ZIMB,

Patrick Vivirito

ROIT 20201 | Intermediate Italian I
Patrick Vivirito

Welcome to ROIT 20201 -Intermediate Italian I (Summer Online). This is an intermediate language course focusing on oral and written production and conducted entirely online. It includes a review of basic introductory-level grammar and transitions into more difficult features of Italian grammar and vocabulary. Students discuss and write about Italian cultural topics and current events. Students will not need to be physically present on campus, but access to a computer with a microphone, a video camera, and high-speed internet is essential. Students must work independently and follow a very structured syllabus. Daily online tasks include reading, listening, completing exercises, posting writing assignments, and recorded responses. Classes run synchronously, meaning that we meet in real-time.

  • Italian
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2053
  • 6 of 16 enrolled
  • LANG,MESE,OLF,SCLN,ZFTY,

Kathleen Boyle

ROIT 63050 | Italian Graduate Reading
Kathleen Boyle

This one semester, intensive study of Italian grammar and syntax is intended for graduate students working in the humanities or sciences, who are interested in acquiring reading proficiency in Italian.

  • Italian
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2054
  • 7 of 16 enrolled
  • OLF,ZIMB,

Marcio Bahia

ROPO 63050 | Portuguese Graduate Reading
Marcio Bahia

This online intensive study of Portuguese grammar and syntax is intended for graduate students working n the humanities or sciences who are interested in acquiring reading proficiency in Portuguese.

  • Portuguese
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2078
  • 9 of 16 enrolled
  • TR 05:00 PM-06:00 PM 06/13 - 07/22
  • OLF,ZIMB,

Joshua Lund

ROSP 63050 | Spanish Graduate Reading
Joshua Lund

A course designed to prepare students for the Graduate Reading Examination. No prerequisites.

  • Spanish
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2094
  • 6 of 16 enrolled
  • MW 11:00 AM-12:00 PM 05/24 - 07/02
  • OLF,ZIMB,

Gabriel Reynolds, Eric DeVilliers

THEO 20706 | Quran, Bible, Christn Theo
Gabriel Reynolds, Eric DeVilliers

The goal of this course is to introduce students to the ways in which Christian theologians have interpreted the scripture of Islam, the Quran, through the centuries, and to explore with them possible Christian theological responses to that scripture. To that end the course will involve a clear presentation of the Quran and Quranic Studies, the relationship of the Qur'an to the Bible, and the tradition of Christian theological reflection on non-Christian religions. This course fulfills the second ("development") requirement. No background in the Qur'an, Arabic, or Islam, is required or expected of students.

  • Theology
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2032
  • 35 of 35 enrolled
  • MWR 05:00 PM-06:30 PM 06/06 - 07/22
  • OLF, THE2,WKDT

Hany Takla

THEO 60009 | Introduction to Coptic
Hany Takla

This course introduces students to the basic grammar and vocabulary of Coptic, the final descendant of ancient Egyptian. Coptic is important for any who are interested in, among other things, early translations of the Bible, monasticism, early Christianity, liturgy, hagiography, homilies, "Gnosticism" (Nag Hammadi), and Manichaeism. This introduction will be focused on the two best attested Coptic dialects, Sahidic and Bohairic. The course is designed to enable students who have no previous training in Coptic to read simple to moderately difficult texts. A Coptic reading course will follow in the next semester. This course satisfies language requirements for certain programs; please check with your academic advisor.

  • Theology
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2063
  • 1 of 3 enrolled
  • MTWR 06:00 PM-08:00 PM 05/31 - 07/07
  • OLF,

Anthony Pagliarini

THEO 60181 | Theology of Revelation
Anthony Pagliarini

God Speaks to us through the Word in Scripture and Tradition. This course intends (1) to provide a deeper knowledge of the Word as He conveys Himself through these two "Streams" of Revelation and (2) to give students the skills necessary to lead others (and themselves) in the ongoing task of theology -- of, that is, faith seeking understanding. In particular, we will study (1) the relation of natural knowledge and divine revelation; (2) the "streams" of revelation that are Scripture and Tradition; (3) the relation between these two and the means of interpreting them; and (4) the salient content of this revelation as it is communicated in the Old Testament, the New Testament, and the first several centuries of the Catholic Tradition.

  • Theology
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2159
  • 41 of 45 enrolled
  • R 08:30 PM-09:30 PM 05/23 - 07/22
  • OLF,

Elizabeth Capdevielle

WR 13400 | Advanced Writing and Rhetoric
Elizabeth Capdevielle

Advanced Writing and Rhetoric is designed to help students continue refining the interpretive, analytical, and composing skills developed through 1) attendance in WR 13100 or 2) a qualifying AP or IB score consistent with university policies. Students will practice composing in multiple genres and modalities, conducting original and secondary research, analyzing audiences, writing claims, providing evidence, addressing alternative perspectives, and revising written materials. The course will devote special attention to writing ethical arguments grounded in rhetorical practices of truthfulness, accountability, open-mindedness, and intellectual integrity.

  • Writing and Rhetoric
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2030
  • 11 of 15 enrolled
  • TR 07:00 PM-09:00 PM 05/30 - 07/22
  • OLF, WRIT,WRRH

Jessica Shumake

WR 13400 | Advanced Writing and Rhetoric
Jessica Shumake

Advanced Writing and Rhetoric is designed to help students continue refining the interpretive, analytical, and composing skills developed through 1) attendance in WR 13100 or 2) a qualifying AP or IB score consistent with university policies. Students will practice composing in multiple genres and modalities, conducting original and secondary research, analyzing audiences, writing claims, providing evidence, addressing alternative perspectives, and revising written materials. The course will devote special attention to writing ethical arguments grounded in rhetorical practices of truthfulness, accountability, open-mindedness, and intellectual integrity.

  • Writing and Rhetoric
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 2259
  • 8 of 15 enrolled
  • MW 08:00 PM-10:00 PM 05/30 - 07/22
  • OLF, WRIT,WRRH

Course Attribute Codes



2DCO 2DCO - 2D Studio Core Option
3DCO 3DCO - 3D Studio Core Option
ACCT ACCT - M.S. Accountancy
ACCY ACCY - M.S. Accountancy E&Y
AERO Inactive-AERO-AERO Electives
AERT AERT - AERO Tech Specializatio
AFAL AFAL - AFST Literature
AFHI AFHI - AFST History
AFSS AFSS - AFST Social Science
AHAA AHAA - ARHI Ancient Art
AHGR AHGR - Grad Level ARHI
AHMA AHMA - ARHI Medieval Art
AHMO AHMO - ARHI Modern Art
AHPO AHPO - ARHI Post-1600 Content
AHPR AHPR - ARHI Pre-1600 Content
AHRB AHRB - ARHI Ren. & Baroque Art
ALHN ALHN- Glynn Family Honors Prgm
ALLN ALLN-Arts&Letters Language Req
ALSS ALSS - A & L- Social Science
AMAN Inactive-AMAN-AMSTAnthro
AMEN Inactive-AMEN-AMST English
AMET Inactive-AMET - AME Tech Elect
AMHI Inactive-AMHI-AMST History
AMIN Inactive-AMIN - AMST Inside
AMPO Inactive-AMPO - AMST Pol Sci
AMS1 AMS1 - AMST Category 1
AMS2 AMS2 - AMST Category 2
AMS3 AMS3 - AMST Category 3
AMSO Inactive-AMSO - AMST Soc Conc
ANAM Inactive-ANAM-ANTH Approach &
ANAS Inactive-ANAS-ANTH AreaStudies
ANEV Inactive-ANEV-ANTH Evol Persp
ANHS Inactive-ANHS-ANTH HonorsExper
ANME ANME - ANTH Methods
ANSE Inactive-ANSE-ANTH Adv Seminar
ANTA Inactive-ANTA-ANTHTopicsAnthro
ARMH ARMH - Army ROTC Military Hist
ASHI ASHI - Asian Studies History
ASHU ASHU -Asian Studies Humanities
ASLI ASLI - Asian Studies Lit/Cultr
ASSS ASSS - Asian Studies Soc Sci
BA01 BA01-Sequence 1 Business Class
BA02 BA02-Sequence 2 Business Class
BA03 BA03-Sequence 3 Business Class
BAHP BAHP - Business Honors Program
BAMC BAMC-Major-lvl business course
BASP BASP-Business Scholars Program
BBRD BBRD-Business Broadening Class
BCOR BCOR - Business Core Class
BEHA BEHA - Behavioral Science
BIOE BIOE-Bioengineerng minor rqmnt
BLAB BLAB - Biology Lab
BSTA Inactive-BSTA - Business Stats
CAPA CAPA - CAPP Applications
CAPE CAPE - CAPP Computer Ethics
CAPL CAPL - CAPP Computer Languages
CAPS Inactive-CAPS - CAPP Stats
CAPT CAPT - CAPP Tech & Society
CBAN CBAN -conc in Business Anlytcs
CBIN CBIN-conc in Business Intlgnce
CDCR CDCR Comptng & Digtl Tech Core
CDCS CDCS- Cmp&Dgtl Tch Cgntve Sci
CDCY CDCY- Cmp&Dgtl Tch Cybr Secrty
CDDA CDDA- Cmp&Dgtl Tch Dgtl Arts
CDDF CDDF- Computatnl/Digital Focus
CDDH CDDH- Cmp&Dgtl Tch Humanities
CDND CDND- Not Comptatnl/Dgtl Focus
CDTD CDTD- Cmp&Dgtl Tch Dev & Mgt
CDUI CDUI- Cmp&Dgtl Tch Usr Intrfce
CEEL Inactive-CEEL - CE Electives
CETE CETE - CE Technical Electives
CFEL CFEL-ECON Financial Concntratn
CHEA CHEA - EALC China or East Asia
CHEG Inactive-CHEG - CHEG Electives
CHGT Inactive-CHGT - CHEG TechElect
CHLT CHLT - EALC Literature
CHSE CHSE - CHEM Science Electives
COMP Inactive-Univ.Req. 1st Yr Comp
CPE2 Inactive-CPE2-CAPPAdd'l Ethics
CPEE CPEE - CPEG Free Elective Seq.
CPTE CPTE - CPEG Technical Elect
CSEM CSEM - College Seminar
CSET Inactive-CSET - CS Tech Elec
CSSE Inactive-CSSE - CS Electives
CSTC CSTC - CST Colloquium
CSTE CSTE - CST Elective
CSTS CSTS - CST Seminar
ECDV Inactive-ECDV - ECON Devel
ECHP Inactive-ECHP - ECON Hist&Phil
ECIN Inactive-ECIN -ECON Internat'l
ECIO Inactive-ECIO-ECON IndustOrg
ECLB Inactive-ECLB - ECON Labor
ECMF Inactive-ECMF-ECONMonetary&Fin
ECPO Inactive-ECPO-ECON Pol Econ
ECQM Inactive-ECQM-ECON Quant Meth
ECUR Inactive-ECUR-ECON Urban&Reg
ECWI ECWI - ECON Writing Intensive
EEEL Inactive-EEEL - EE Electives
EELE EELE - EE LabElective
EESE EESE - EE Science Electives
EETE Inactive-EETE - EE Techn Elctv
EINT EINT - English Intro
ELHA ELHA - ENGL Lit History Area A
ELHB ELHB - ENGL Lit History Area B
ELHC ELHC - ENGL Lit History Area C
EMTH Inactive-EMTH - ENGL Methods
EN01 EN01 - ENGL Pre-1500
EN02 EN02 - ENGL 1500-1700
EN03 EN03 - ENGL 1700-1900
EN04 EN04 - ENGL Post-1900
EN05 EN05 - ENGL British Lit
EN06 EN06 - ENGL American Lit
EN07 EN07 - ENGL Other or EthnicLit
EN08 EN08 - ENGL Poetry
EN09 EN09 - ENGL Fiction
EN10 EN10 - ENGL Drama or Film
EN11 EN11 - ENGL Critical Theory
EN12 EN12 - Nonfiction
ENCH Inactive-ENCH-CHEG EGCHEM Elec
ENCL Inactive-ENCL-CLALClass in Eng
ENGL ENGL - ENGL Upper-level Elect
ENNT ENNT - Enrgy Studies Nontechcl
ENST ENST - Energy Studies
ENTE ENTE - Enrgy Studies Technical
ENVG Inactive-ENVG - ENVG Electives
EPOL Inactive-EPOL - ECON Policy
ESED ESED - MEDS Education-General
ESEI ESEI - MEDS Education-Focused
ESEM Inactive-ESEM - ENGL Seminar
ESSC ESSC-Educ School&Socty-Culture
ESSE ESSE-Envronmntl Science Electv
ESSL ESSL-Educ Schol&Socty-Learning
ESSP ESSP- Educ School&Socty-Policy
FLIT FLIT - ROFR French Literature
FMTV Inactive-FMTV - FTT FMTV Elect
FNAR FNAR - old Core Fine Arts
FTII FTII - International/Identity
FTVT FTVT - FTT Theory Requirement
GEEL GEEL - GE Electives
GLBC GLBC - Global Cultures
GLBP GLBP - Global Politics
GLHU GLHU-GlobAffrs Hist Understand
GLPS GLPS - GlobAffrs Peace Studies
GLRF GLRF- GlobAffrs Regional Focus
GLRM GLRM-GlobAffrs Research Methds
GRLL Inactive-GRLL-CLAL Gr Lang/Lit
GSAC GSAC - GSC Arts & Culture
GSCE GSCE-Gender Studies Core Elect
GSCR GSCR - GSC Core Graduate Semin
GSDI GSDI - GSC Race,Class,Diversit
GSEM GSEM - Gen Studies Senior Sem.
GSFE Inactive-GSFE-GSC Fem Theory
GSGS GSGS - GSC Gender & Society
GSHU Inactive-GSHU - GSC Humanities
GSIS GSIS-Gndr Stdies Interdisc Sem
GSRF GSRF - GSC Religion & Family
GSSS Inactive-GSSS - GSC Socl Sci
HBAM HBAM-Hist ofAfrica&Middle East
HBAS HBAS - History of Asia
HBEU HBEU - History of Europe
HBLA HBLA- History of Latin America
HBNA HBNA-History of North America
HCT1 HCT1 -HIST Cat 1:AF/AS/ME
HCT2 HCT2 -HIST Cat2:Anc/Med Europe
HCT3 HCT3 -HIST Cat 3:Modern Europe
HCT4 HCT4 -HIST Cat 4: Latin Amer
HCT5 HCT5 - HIST Cat 5: US
HCT6 HCT6 -HIST Cat 6: Special
HGLB HGLB - Global History
HIST HIST - old Core History
HPIP HPIP -Hesburgh Pgm Inst & Proc
HPRE HPRE - HIST: Pre-1500 Courses
HPRS HPRS -Hesburgh Pgm Rsrch Tools
HPSE HPSE -Hesburgh Pgm Rsrch Sem
HPSH HPSH - History Track for HPS
HPSP HPSP -Philosophy Track for HPS
HPST HPST - Theology Track for HPS
HPTP HPTP-Hesburgh Pgm Policy Topic
HPVL HPVL -Hesburgh Pgm Values
HTBE HTBE-Histry of Business&Ecnmcs
HTGL HTGL-History of Global Empires
HTGS HTGS-History of Gendr&Sexualty
HTME HTME-History of Medieval World
HTRA HTRA - History of Race
HTRE HTRE - History of Religion
HTWS HTWS - History of War&Society
IBCB IBCB - IBC Business
IBCL IBCL - IBC Liberal Arts
IEEL IEEL - IE economics elective
ITEL Inactive-ITEL - ROIT Electives
ITLC ITLC - ROIT Italian Lit & Cult
ITLS ITLS - ROIT Italian Subject
JAEA JAEA - EALJ Japan or E. Asian
JAPL JAPL - EALJ Literature
JEDE JEDE - Journalism Electives
LALL Inactive-LALL-CLAL LatLang/Lit
LANG LANG - College Language Req
LAST LAST - Latin Amer. Studies
LDSC LDSC- Ltd Degree Crdt:Science
LIT LIT - old Core Literature
LPBC Inactive-LPBC-LondonProgBritC
LULW LULW - LAW Upper-level Writing
MATG MATG - Minor in Accounting
MATH MATH - old Core Mathematics
MCCE MCCE-Compassnte Care Med Elctv
MCCS MCCS-Compssnte Care Exp/Skills
MCEL Inactive-MCEL-MGT Consul Elec
MDSA MDSA-Data Science mnr analytcs
MDSC MDSC - Data Science minor
MEBH MEBH-Economic&Business History
MEEL Inactive-MEEL-MGT Entrepr Elec
MESE MESE - European Studies Course
MET MET - ME General Techncl Elctv
MGAM MGAM - Research Methods
MGAP MGAP - Global Politics
MGTI Inactive-MGTI - ITM Electives
MIHL Inactive-MIHL-MI Med Hist/Lit
MIPT Inactive-MIPT-MI Med Phil/Theo
MMI Inactive-MMI-MI Med Studies
MMME MMME - Mediter/Mid East Elect
MMTH MMTH -Musical Theatre Elective
MPL Inactive - MPL - MPL Electives
MPPE MPPE -Minor in Phil, Pol &Econ
MPRL MPRL -Minor in Phil,Rlgn & Lit
MREL MREL-Real Estate Minor Electv
MRLE MRLE - MRLT Electives
MRLT Inactive-MRLT-MRLT Rel & Lit
MRUS MRUS - Russian Studies
MSAE MSAE - Mat Sci & Eng. PhD
MSCE MSCE - MATH Science Elective
MUSE MUSE - MUS Ensemble
MUSL MUSL - MUS Music Lessons
NASC NASC - old Core Natur. Science
NBSE NBSE - Non-BIOS Science Elect
NRCS Inactive-NRCS Navy Comp Sci
NSBH NSBH - Neuroscience elective
NSEC Inactive-NSEC Navy Nat'l Sec
NSMA NSMA - NROTC Secrty/Miltry Aff
NVCA NVCA - NROTC Culturl Awareness
OLF OLF-Fully Online (100 percent)
OLH OLH-Hybrid Online(20-74 prcnt)
OLM OLM-Mostly Online(75-99 prcnt)
PAMR Inactive-PAMR - POLS Amer Pol
PBLP PBLP - PSY Biological & Learn.
PCOM Inactive-PCOM-POLS Comp Pol
PE PE - Univ.Req.- Phys Ed
PHAP Inactive-PHAP-Applied PhysElec
PHI2 PHI2 - old Core 2nd Philosophy
PHIL PHIL - old Core 1st Philosophy
PHMA Inactive-PHMA-Physics MathElec
PIR PIR - POLS Inter'l Relations
PLA1 Inactive-PLA1-PhD in Lit Area1
PLA2 Inactive-PLA2-PhD in Lit Area2
PMFC PMFC - POLS Methods Course
POLE Inactive-POLE-POLS Upper Elec
PSAA Inactive-PSAA - IIPS Area A
PSAB Inactive-PSAB - IIPS Area B
PSAC Inactive-PSAC - IIPS Area C
PSCE PSCE-Povrty Studies Experientl
PSCR PSCR - Peace Studies Core
PSDP PSDP - PSY Social & Devel
PSEL Inactive-PSEL - IIPS Electives
PSGE InactivePSGE-PeaceStdGradElctv
PSGP InactivePSGP-PS Glbl Pol&Hmn R
PSIM PSIM - Poverty Studies Elect.
PSPE InactvePSPE-PS PolEcn,Dev&Glbl
PSRC InactivePSRC-PS Relgn,Cltr&Soc
PSSP PSSP - Peace Studies Support
PTHR Inactive-PTHR-POLS Pol Theory
PWCP PWCP - MPCT Catholic Philo
PWPS PWPS - MPCT Political Science
REES REES - Russ. & E Euro. Studies
RSEL RSEL - Rslncy & Sus Minr Elctv
RUES Inactive-RUES Russ& E Eur Stud
SANC SANC - Study Abroad, Non-Core
SCEL Inactive-SCEL - SCPP Sci Elec
SCLN SCLN-Science Language Req
SEIC SEIC-SEI Minr Capstone Reqrmnt
SEID SEID -SEI Minor Design Reqrmnt
SEIE SEIE -SEI Minor Electv Reqrmnt
SOCE Inactive-SOCE - SOC Electives
SOSC SOSC - old Core Social Science
SOST Inactive-SOST - SOC Statistics
STHD Inactive-STHD-MSTV Human Dimen
STPP Inactive-STPP-MSTV Publ Policy
STVE Inactive-STVE - MSTV Ethics
STVF STVF -Sci, Tech,& Values Fndtn
SUS1 SUS1 - Design
SUS2 SUS2 - Impacts
SUS3 SUS3 - Social Institutions
SUS4 SUS4 - Indiv Behavior & Values
THE2 THE2 - old Core Dvlpmnt Theo
THE3 Inactive-THE3-Theo 30000 Level
THEA Inactive-THEA-FTT THEA Elec
THEO THEO - old Core 1st Theology
TVTO TVTO - FTT Television Topics
USEM USEM - University Seminar
WKAR WKAR - new Core Art
WKCD WKCD - new Core Cathol&Discipl
WKDT WKDT-new Core Devel. Theology
WKFP WKFP - new Core 1st Philosophy
WKFT WKFT-new Core Found. Theology
WKHI WKHI - new Core History
WKIN WKIN - new Core Integration
WKLC WKLC-new Core Adv Lang&Culture
WKLI WKLI - new Core Literature
WKQR WKQR- new Core Quant Reasoning
WKSP WKSP - new Core 2nd Philosophy
WKSS WKSS - new Core Social Science
WKST WKST-new Core Science&Tech.
WRIT WRIT - Writing Intensive
WRRH WRRH-Univ Req Writing&Rhetoric
ZAPV ZAPV - Approved Non-Standard
ZCIF Inactive - ZCIF-Include in CIF
ZCSC ZCSC-Commnty Engagmnt Course
ZDEL Inactive-ZDEL-Delete Attr
ZDFA ZDFA: Not approved: Univ. FNAR
ZDHI ZDHI: Not approved: Univ. HIST
ZDLI ZDLI: Not approved: Univ. LIT
ZDMA ZDMA: Not approved: Univ. MATH
ZDP1 ZDP1: Not approved: Univ. PHIL
ZDP2 ZDP2: Not approved: Univ. PHI2
ZDSC ZDSC: Not approved: Univ. NASC
ZDSS ZDSS: Not approved: Univ. SOSC
ZDT1 ZDT1: Not approved: Univ. THEO
ZDT2 ZDT2: Not approved: Univ. THE2
ZFTY ZFTY -FYS Tally Report (Admin)
ZFYS ZFYS - FYS Bulletin (Admin)
ZIMB ZIMB - Instl Method Both (Adm)
ZINT ZINT - Student Intrnshp Course
ZNBL ZNBL - Not Publ in Bull.(Adm)
ZNDC ZNDC - Non-degree Credit (Adm)
ZOAC ZOAC-Alcoy, Spain(AC)
ZOAE ZOAE - Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
ZOAF ZOAF - Angers,France (AF)
ZOAG ZOAG - Athens, Greece (AG)
ZOAJ ZOAJ-Amman, Jordan(AJ)
ZOAN ZOAN - Auckland, New Zealand
ZOAS ZOAS-St. Andrews, Scotland(AS)
ZOAU ZOAU - Angers, France - UCO
ZOAW ZOAW - SMC Around the World
ZOBA ZOBA - Buenos Aires, Argentina
ZOBC ZOBC - Beijing, China (BC)
ZOBE ZOBE - Bath, England (BE)
ZOBG ZOBG - Berlin, Germany (BG)
ZOBH ZOBH - Beijing and Hong Kong
ZOBJ ZOBJ-Beijing Ctr-Loyola Chicgo
ZOBM ZOBM - Bremen Germany (BM)
ZOBN ZOBN - Berlin, Germany (BN)
ZOBP ZOBP - Budapest, Hungary (BP)
ZOBR ZOBR - Barcelona, Spain
ZOBT ZOBT - Bologna, Italy (BT)
ZOBX ZOBX -Beijing,China(Lang Prgm)
ZOBY ZOBY - Beijing Global Gateway
ZOBZ ZOBZ -Salvador da Bahia,Brazil
ZOCC ZOCC - China Culture (CC)
ZOCD ZOCD-Copehnhagen, Denmark (CD)
ZOCE ZOCE - Cairo, Egypt (CE)
ZOCG ZOCG -Chicago Graduate Busness
ZOCI ZOCI - China Archtre Prgrm(CI)
ZOCL ZOCL-Chicago, IL -Law(CL)
ZOCM ZOCM - Cambridge (CM)
ZOCO ZOCO-Ancient Corinth, Greece
ZOCP ZOCP-Chicago Patent Law (CP)
ZOCS ZOCS - Capetown, South Africa
ZOCT ZOCT - Catania, Italy (CT)
ZOCU ZOCU - HKU Hong, Kong(CU)
ZOCZ ZOCZ-Croatia -Zagreb Schl Econ
ZODB ZODB-Dublin Summer Business
ZODC ZODC - Washington, DC (DC)
ZODF ZODF - Dijon, France (SMC)
ZODI ZODI - Dublin, Ireland
ZODM ZODM - Maynooth, Ireland (SMC)
ZODN ZODN - Durham, England
ZODO ZODO - Online Learning
ZODS ZODS - Dakar, Senegal (DS)
ZODU ZODU - Dublin City Univ (DU)
ZOEC ZOEC - China Engnrg Prgrm (EC)
ZOES ZOES - Edinburgh, Scotland(ES)
ZOFA ZOFA - Fremantle, Australia
ZOFW ZOFW - Fort Wayne, IN - THEO
ZOGE ZOGE-German Summer Engineering
ZOGI ZOGI - German Summer Immersion
ZOGL ZOGL-Bucerius Lw-Hamburg,Grmny
ZOGN ZOGN - Granada, Spain (GN)
ZOGP ZOGP-Global Profssnl Expernce
ZOGR ZOGR - Global Rsrch Experience
ZOGS ZOGS - Gibraltar (GS)
ZOHG ZOHG - Heidelberg, Germany
ZOHK ZOHK - Hong Kong, China (HK)
ZOHT ZOHT- Hong Kong, China (HKUST)
ZOHU ZOHU -Heidelberg Univ, Germany
ZOIA ZOIA - Innsbruck, Austria - UG
ZOIC ZOIC-Co. Galway, Ireland (IC)
ZOIE ZOIE-Intnl Econ:Berlin, et al.
ZOIG ZOIG - Ireland Engineering
ZOIH ZOIH - IRISH Seminar
ZOII ZOII - Ireland Inside Track
ZOIK ZOIK -Ireland - Kylemore Abbey
ZOIR ZOIR - Dublin, Ireland (IR)
ZOIS ZOIS - Dublin, Ireland -Summer
ZOIT ZOIT - Dublin,Irel-TrinityColl
ZOJ1 ZOJ1-Jerusalem Summer Sessn 1
ZOJ2 ZOJ2-Jerusalem Summer Sessn 2
ZOJB ZOJB - Journalism in Britain
ZOJE ZOJE - Tantur, Israel (JE)
ZOJG ZOJG - Japan, Engineering
ZOJM ZOJM - Jerusalem - MA
ZOJS ZOJS-Jerusalem,Israel (Summer)
ZOJT ZOJT - Jerusalem, Tantur - PhD
ZOKE ZOKE-Kylemore Engineering
ZOKS ZOKS - Korea University, Seoul
ZOKU ZOKU - Kampala, Uganda (KU)
ZOKW ZOKW-Keough School-Washngtn,DC
ZOKY ZOKY-Kyoto, Japan
ZOLA ZOLA - London, Eng-Fall/Spring
ZOLB ZOLB - Leuven, Belgium (LB)
ZOLE ZOLE - London, Eng - LAW-JD
ZOLG ZOLG - London, Eng - Summer EG
ZOLH ZOLH - London, Eng (Heythrop)
ZOLI ZOLI- London (Smmr EG Imp)(LI)
ZOLN ZOLN - London Science
ZOLP ZOLP - SOAS, Univ. of London
ZOLS ZOLS - London, Eng - Summer AL
ZOLU ZOLU-Lucerne, Switzerland(Law)
ZOLW ZOLW - Washington,DC Law Prgrm
ZOLY ZOLY - London Seminar
ZOMB ZOMB - Rabat, Morocco - CIEE
ZOMC ZOMC - Montreal, Canada (MC)
ZOMD ZOMD - Madrid, Spain
ZOMI ZOMI - Milan, Italy (MI)
ZOML ZOML - Milan, Italy (Law) (ML)
ZOMM ZOMM -Mexico City, Mexico (MM)
ZOMR ZOMR - Rabat, Morocco (MR)
ZOMX ZOMX - Monterrey, Mexico (MX)
ZOMZ ZOMZ - Mumbai, India (MZ)
ZONJ ZONJ - Nagoya, Japan (NJ)
ZONU ZONU-Norwich,UK(U of E.Anglia)
ZONZ ZONZ - New Zealand (NZ)
ZOOL ZOOL-OnlineLearning (inactive)
ZOOX ZOOX - Oxford University (OX)
ZOPA ZOPA - Perth, Australia (PA)
ZOPB ZOPB - Sao Paulo, Brazil (PB)
ZOPC ZOPC - Peking Univ - Beijing
ZOPD ZOPD - Paris, France (Diderot)
ZOPE ZOPE - Paris, France (Summer)
ZOPF ZOPF - Paris, France (Sci Po)
ZOPI ZOPI - Palermo, Italy (Arch.)
ZOPL ZOPL-Paris,France(Paris II-LW)
ZOPM ZOPM - Puebla, Mexico (PM)
ZOPO ZOPO - Pre-College Online
ZOPR ZOPR - Prague, Czech Republic
ZOPT ZOPT - Puebla, Mexico (ITESM)
ZOPU ZOPU - St. Thomas THEO Center
ZOPZ ZOPZ - Poland Seminar
ZOQE ZOQE - Quito, Ecuador (QE)
ZORA ZORA - Rome Engineering
ZORB ZORB - Rio de Janeiro (RB)
ZORE ZORE - Rome, Italy - UG (RE)
ZORF ZORF - Rome, Italy-Facilitated
ZORG ZORG-Regensburg, Germany (RG)
ZORH ZORH-Rome, Italy(Summr EG)(RH)
ZORI ZORI -Rome, Italy-Architecture
ZORL ZORL - Rome, Italy
ZORP ZORP - St. Petersburg, Russia
ZORR ZORR - Rome, Italy (Summer)
ZORS ZORS - St. Petersburg, Russia
ZORT ZORT -Rome Summer Seminar (RT)
ZORU ZORU - Moscow, Russia (RU)
ZORV ZORV - Vladimir, Russia (RV)
ZORW ZORW - Kigali, Rwanda (RW)
ZORX ZORX - Rome Summer Program(RX)
ZORY ZORY - Rome Global Gateway
ZORZ ZORZ - Rome Seminar
ZOSA ZOSA-Johannesberg,South Africa
ZOSB ZOSB - South Bend, IN (SB)
ZOSC ZOSC - Santiago, Chile-UG (SC)
ZOSE ZOSE - South Africa Entrprship
ZOSG ZOSG-Shanghai, China-MBA(SG)
ZOSH ZOSH - Shanghai, China (SH)
ZOSI ZOSI- National U. of Singapore
ZOSK ZOSK - Seoul, Korea (SK)
ZOSO ZOSO -Santiago, Chile-MBA (SO)
ZOSP ZOSP - Toledo, Spain (SP)
ZOSS ZOSS-Silicon Valley,California
ZOST ZOST - Singapore and Thailand
ZOSU ZOSU-Stellenbosch U., S.Africa
ZOSV ZOSV - Seville, Spain (ZOSV)
ZOSW ZOSW-Geneva,Switzerland (CERN)
ZOSY ZOSY-Sydney,Australia
ZOSZ ZOSZ - Shenzhen, China
ZOTA ZOTA- Tel Aviv,Israel-Law Schl
ZOTB ZOTB - Tsinghua Univ - Beijing
ZOTE ZOTE - Twickenham, England(TE)
ZOTI ZOTI - Tuscany, Italy (TI)
ZOTJ ZOTJ - Tokyo, Japan
ZOTK ZOTK - Tokyo, Japan(Keio Univ)
ZOTL ZOTL - Trinity Law - Dublin
ZOTT ZOTT - Taipei, Taiwan
ZOTU ZOTU - Tel Aviv, Israel
ZOUC ZOUC-Chicago, Illinois (Arch.)
ZOVC ZOVC - Vancouver, Canada (VC)
ZOVI ZOVI - Vienna, Austria (ZOVI)
ZOWL ZOWL - West Lafayette, IN-THEO
ZOXF ZOXF - Paris, France (XF)
ZOXG ZOXG-Exchnge w/ Karlsruhe Univ
ZP01 Inactive-ZP01-Test: Phys Row 1
ZPND ZPND - Pending Appeal
ZREJ ZREJ - Rejected Non-Standard
ZTST ZTST - Final exam
ZUG1 ZUG1 - UG Research (Admin)
ZUG2 ZUG2-UG Critical Anlysis (Adm)
ZUG3 ZUG3-UGCreativeExpression(Adm)
ZUG4 ZUG4 - UGIntern/Practicum(Adm)