Summer Courses 2021

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Below is a preliminary list of courses that will be offered in Summer 2021. Class meeting patterns are subject to change until registration opens on April 7th, 2021. If you have any questions regarding the Summer Online course offerings, please email summeronline@nd.edu.

For information on financial aid, please visit summersession.nd.edu/tuition-financial-aid.

Please note:

  • Graduate students can utilize their Summer Tuition Scholarships towards Summer Online courses.
  • Faculty and staff may use their educational benefits towards Summer Online courses for themselves and their dependents. More information can be found on the Ask HR site.

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Edward Hums

ACCT 24101 | Accountancy I
Edward Hums

An introduction to financial accounting and the accounting profession, with an emphasis on the decision-usefulness of accounting information. The course stresses the relation of accounting to economic activity, organizing information for decision-making, the resource acquisition decision, the uses of cash and noncash resources, the accounting for selling and manufacturing activities, and the information needs of multiple owners, lenders and equity holders. A prerequisite of all accountancy and finance courses. Course cannot be taken Pass/Fail.

  • Accountancy
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1373
  • 0 of 28 enrolled
  • MTW 07:30 PM-09:10 PM 05/31 - 07/09
  • BA02,OLF,ZODO,

Edward Hums

ACCT 24201 | Accountancy II
Edward Hums

A continuation of the introduction to accounting, with an emphasis on the use of accounting information and analysis for management decision and control. The purpose of the course is the learning of accounting techniques such as budget preparation, cost-volume-profit analysis, variable costing, contribution margins, relevant costing, performance evaluation of business units, transfer pricing and responsibility accounting for the planning, decision making and management control inside an organization. To complete a general knowledge of accounting and its usefulness in financial reporting and control the course also includes an introduction to auditing, attestation, corporate governance and the impact of Sarbanes Oxley Act on business organizations, plus an introduction to US taxation for individuals and corporations Course cannot be taken Pass/Fail.

  • Accountancy
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1374
  • 0 of 28 enrolled
  • MTW 05:00 PM-06:40 PM 05/31 - 07/09
  • BA02,OLF,ZODO,

James O'Brien

ACCT 60111 | Federal Taxation
James O'Brien

The purpose of the course is to provide a broad introduction to taxation. The course is designed to prepare students for the Taxes and Business Strategy Course. Major topics to be covered in this first tax course include: types of taxes, tax rates, taxes and present values, tax planning, income from business operations, individuals (basics), investment planning, nontaxable transactions and tax considerations for property acquisitions.

  • Accountancy
  • 1.5 credits    CRN 1341
  • 0 of 15 enrolled
  • MTWRF 09:00 AM-12:00 PM 07/26 - 07/30
  • ACCT,OLF,

Keith Urtel

ACCT 60112 | Intermediate Accounting I
Keith Urtel

This course is the first of a two course sequence that cover intermediate level financial reporting topics. Topics covered across the two courses include: economic and institutional setting for financial reporting, accrual accounting and income determination, role of financial information in valuation, role of financial information in contracting, receivables, inventories, long-lived assets, financial instruments as liabilities, leases, pensions and post-retirement benefits, income tax reporting, and owners' equity.

  • Accountancy
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 1338
  • 0 of 15 enrolled
  • MWFS 04:00 PM-05:30 PM 06/21 - 07/03
  • OLF,

Keith Urtel

ACCT 60122 | Intermediate Accounting II
Keith Urtel

This course is the second of a two course sequence that cover intermediate level financial reporting topics. Topics covered across the two courses include: economic and institutional setting for financial reporting, accrual accounting and income determination, role of financial information in valuation, role of financial information in contracting, receivables, inventories, long-lived assets, financial instruments as liabilities, leases, pensions and post-retirement benefits, income tax reporting, and owners' equity.

  • Accountancy
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 1337
  • 0 of 15 enrolled
  • MWF 04:00 PM-05:30 PM 07/05 - 07/09 |MWS 04:00 PM-05:30 PM 07/12 - 07/17 |MWF 04:00 PM-05:30 PM 07/19 - 07/23 |MWS 04:00 PM-05:30 PM 07/26 - 07/31
  • ,

Kenneth Milani

ACCT 60232 | Strategic Cost Management
Kenneth Milani

This course builds on and reinforces concepts from the introductory accounting courses with applications in accounting and strategic cost management settings. The course is designed to help students become discriminating producers and users of strategic cost accounting information for decision-making. The course demonstrates how cost management analysts can add value to their organizations by providing recommendations to improve profitability of products, services, customers, and value streams. The course also focuses on measuring causes or drivers of costs, and making recommendations about capacity, quality, and time.

  • Accountancy
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 1339
  • 0 of 15 enrolled
  • MTRF 08:00 AM-10:45 AM 06/21 - 06/25 |S 08:00 AM-09:15 AM 06/26 - 06/26 |M 09:30 AM-10:45 AM 06/28 - 06/28 |WRF 08:00 AM-10:45 AM 06/30 - 07/02 |MTW 08:00 AM-10:45 AM 07/05 - 07/07 |R 08:00 AM-09:15 AM 07/08 - 07/08 |F 09:30 AM-10:45 AM 07/09 - 07/09
  • OLF,

James O'Brien

ACCT 60411 | Federal Taxation - Immersion
James O'Brien

The purpose of the course is to provide a broad introduction to taxation. The course is designed to prepare students for the Taxes and Business Strategy Course. Major topics to be covered in this first tax course include: types of taxes, tax rates, taxes and present values, tax planning, income from business operations, individuals (basics), investment planning, nontaxable transactions and tax considerations for property acquisitions.

  • Accountancy
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 1336
  • 0 of 15 enrolled
  • MTWRF 01:00 PM-05:00 PM 06/14 - 06/18
  • OLF,

Keith Urtel

ACCT 60512 | Audit & Assurance Service
Keith Urtel

This course provides a conceptual framework of the principles, standards, and procedures underlying financial audits. Topics covered include: generally accepted auditing standards, materiality and audit risk thresholds, issuance of the audit report, the audit process and documentation, internal control in a financial statement audit, analytical procedures, and auditor's legal liability, including the auditor's responsibility for fraud.

  • Accountancy
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 1340
  • 0 of 15 enrolled
  • MWF 02:30 PM-03:45 PM 07/12 - 07/16 |TWF 02:30 PM-03:45 PM 07/20 - 07/23 |MWF 02:30 PM-03:45 PM 07/26 - 07/30
  • ,

Zachary Miksis

ACMS 14145 | Stats for Business I
Zachary Miksis

A conceptual introduction to the science of data for students of business. Descriptive statistics: graphical methods, measures of central tendency, spread, and association. Basic probability theory and probability models for random variables. Introduction to statistical inference: confidence intervals and hypothesis tests. Many examples will be based on real, current business and economics datasets. Calculations will be illustrated in Microsoft Excel.

  • Applied & Comp Math and Stats
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1570
  • 0 of 35 enrolled
  • BA01,OLF,ZOBJ,ZODO, MATH,WKQR

Alan Huebner

ACMS 24215 | R Programming
Alan Huebner

In this course, you will learn the foundational skills necessary in R that will enable you to acquire and manipulate data, complete exploratory data analysis (EDA), and create visualizations to communicate your findings. <p> Note: this course is delivered fully online. The course design combines required live weekly meetings online with self-scheduled lectures, problems, assignments, and interactive learning materials. To participate, students will need to have a computer with webcam, reliable internet connection, and a quiet place to participate in live sessions. <P> Students with other prerequisite courses or equivalent background preparation may enroll by permission of the instructor or permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies, Professor Alan Huebner (Alan.Huebner.10@nd.edu).

  • Applied & Comp Math and Stats
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 1413
  • 0 of 20 enrolled
  • T 07:00 PM-09:00 PM 05/31 - 07/15
  • OLF,ZODO,

John Dillon

ACMS 24216 | Python Programming
John Dillon

In this course, you will learn the foundational skills necessary in Python that will enable you to acquire and manipulate data, model data for the purposes of scientific analysis, and create visualizations to communicate your findings. The course will introduce you to efficient scientific computing using NumPy. You will learn how to apply the pandas library to perform a variety of data manipulation tasks, including selecting, subsetting, combining, grouping, and aggregating data. You will also learn how to generate and customize visualizations with matplotlib. The course will give you the basic ideas and intuition behind modern data analysis methods and their applications, with a strong focus on a course project and weekly assignments. <p> Note: this course is delivered fully online. The course design combines required live weekly meetings online with self-scheduled lectures, problems, assignments, and interactive learning materials. To participate, students will need to have a computer with webcam, reliable internet connection, and a quiet place to participate in live sessions. <P> Students with other prerequisite courses or equivalent background preparation may enroll by permission of the instructor or permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies, Professor Alan Huebner (Alan.Huebner.10@nd.edu).

  • Applied & Comp Math and Stats
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 1262
  • 0 of 20 enrolled
  • W 07:00 PM-09:00 PM 05/31 - 07/23
  • OLF,ZODO,

Alan Huebner

ACMS 34445 | Prob & Stats: Data Sc
Alan Huebner

In this course, you will learn the fundamentals of probability theory and statistical inference used in data science. These foundational principles and techniques will allow you to transform data science problems into mathematical terms and validate them as statistical statements. <p> Note: this course is delivered fully online. The course design combines required live weekly meetings online with self-scheduled lectures, problems, assignments, and interactive learning materials. To participate, students will need to have a computer with webcam, reliable internet connection, and a quiet place to participate in live sessions. <P> Students with other prerequisite courses or equivalent background preparation may enroll by permission of the instructor or permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies, Professor Alan Huebner (Alan.Huebner.10@nd.edu).

  • Applied & Comp Math and Stats
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1274
  • 0 of 20 enrolled
  • MW 08:00 PM-09:30 PM 05/31 - 07/23
  • OLF,ZODO,

Victoria Woodard

ACMS 54850 | Intermediate Probability
Victoria Woodard

This course introduces the theory of probability with emphasis on applications. Topics include discrete and continuous random variables, conditional probability and independent events, generating functions, laws of large numbers, the central limit theorem, Markov chains, Martingales, Brownian motion, and stochastic processes. This course is intended for Master students to be taken online and is not a qualified course for ACMS Ph D written exam. ACMS students in the PhD program should take ACMS 60850 instead. Note: This course is delivered fully online with a combination of synchronous live weekly meetings and asynchronous material. To participate, students will need to have a computer with webcam, reliable internet connection, and a quiet place to participate in live sessions.

  • Applied & Comp Math and Stats
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1278
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • M 07:30 PM-09:00 PM 05/31 - 07/23
  • OLF,ZODO,

Alan Huebner

ACMS 64051 | R Programming
Alan Huebner

In this course, you will learn the foundational skills necessary in R that will enable you to acquire and manipulate data, complete exploratory data analysis (EDA), and create visualizations to communicate your findings. <p> Note: this course is delivered fully online. The course design combines required live weekly meetings online with self-scheduled lectures, problems, assignments, and interactive learning materials. To participate, students will need to have a computer with webcam, reliable internet connection, and a quiet place to participate in live sessions. <P> Students with other prerequisite courses or equivalent background preparation may enroll by permission of the instructor or permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies, Professor Alan Huebner (Alan.Huebner.10@nd.edu).

  • Applied & Comp Math and Stats
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 1414
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • T 07:00 PM-09:00 PM 05/31 - 07/15
  • OLF,ZODO,

John Dillon

ACMS 64052 | Python Programming
John Dillon

In this course, you will learn the foundational skills necessary in Python that will enable you to acquire and manipulate data, model data for the purposes of scientific analysis, and create visualizations to communicate your findings. The course will introduce you to efficient scientific computing using NumPy. You will learn how to apply the pandas library to perform a variety of data manipulation tasks, including selecting, subsetting, combining, grouping, and aggregating data. You will also learn how to generate and customize visualizations with matplotlib. The course will give you the basic ideas and intuition behind modern data analysis methods and their applications, with a strong focus on a course project and weekly assignments.

  • Applied & Comp Math and Stats
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 1263
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • W 07:00 PM-09:00 PM 05/31 - 07/23
  • OLF,ZODO,

Alan Huebner

ACMS 64054 | Prob & Stats: Data Sc
Alan Huebner

In this course, you will learn the fundamentals of probability theory and statistical inference used in data science. These foundational principles and techniques will allow you to transform data science problems into mathematical terms and validate them as statistical statements. Note: this course is delivered fully online. The course design combines required live weekly meetings online with self-scheduled lectures, problems, assignments, and interactive learning materials. To participate, students will need to have a computer with webcam, reliable internet connection, and a quiet place to participate in live sessions.

  • Applied & Comp Math and Stats
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1275
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • MW 08:00 PM-09:30 PM 05/31 - 07/23
  • OLF,ZODO,

Pushpi Paranamana

ACMS 64665 | Time Series
Pushpi Paranamana

Focusing on financial data sets and applications, in this course students study time series models and computational techniques for model estimation, model diagnostics and forecasting.

  • Applied & Comp Math and Stats
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1543
  • 0 of 35 enrolled
  • R 06:00 PM-07:30 PM 05/31 - 07/02
  • OLF,ZODO,

Victoria Woodard

ACMS 64849 | Intermediate Probability
Victoria Woodard

This course introduces the theory of probability with emphasis on applications. Topics include discrete and continuous random variables, conditional probability and independent events, generating functions, laws of large numbers, the central limit theorem, Markov chains, Martingales, Brownian motion, and stochastic processes. This course is intended for Master students to be taken online and is not a qualified course for ACMS Ph D written exam. ACMS students in the PhD program should take ACMS 60850 instead. Note: This course is delivered fully online with a combination of synchronous live weekly meetings and asynchronous material. To participate, students will need to have a computer with webcam, reliable internet connection, and a quiet place to participate in live sessions.

  • Applied & Comp Math and Stats
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1277
  • 0 of 20 enrolled
  • M 07:30 PM-09:00 PM 05/31 - 07/23
  • OLF,ZODO,

AL 24004 | Internship

Taught in Santiago, Chile

  • Arts and Letters (Non-dept.)
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1515
  • 0 of 1 enrolled
  • ZOSC,

Collin Meissner

AL 45999 | Summer Internship
Collin Meissner

Credit toward graduation for up to two internships is available for College of Arts and Letters students upon approval by a dean in the Office for Undergraduate Studies. Students are required to provide a goals and objectives statement and to obtain a letter of offer for the internship in advance of beginning the internship, to keep a daily journal over the course of the internship, to have a letter of evaluation provided upon completion of duties, and to write a reflection paper.

  • Arts and Letters (Non-dept.)
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1516
  • 0 of 3 enrolled
  • ZINT,

Nicholas Russo

AL 45999 | Summer Internship
Nicholas Russo

Credit toward graduation for up to two internships is available for College of Arts and Letters students upon approval by a dean in the Office for Undergraduate Studies. Students are required to provide a goals and objectives statement and to obtain a letter of offer for the internship in advance of beginning the internship, to keep a daily journal over the course of the internship, to have a letter of evaluation provided upon completion of duties, and to write a reflection paper.

  • Arts and Letters (Non-dept.)
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1517
  • 0 of 3 enrolled
  • ZINT,

Joseph Stanfiel

AL 45999 | Summer Internship
Joseph Stanfiel

Credit toward graduation for up to two internships is available for College of Arts and Letters students upon approval by a dean in the Office for Undergraduate Studies. Students are required to provide a goals and objectives statement and to obtain a letter of offer for the internship in advance of beginning the internship, to keep a daily journal over the course of the internship, to have a letter of evaluation provided upon completion of duties, and to write a reflection paper.

  • Arts and Letters (Non-dept.)
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1518
  • 0 of 3 enrolled
  • ZINT,

Maureen Dawson

AL 45999 | Summer Internship
Maureen Dawson

Credit toward graduation for up to two internships is available for College of Arts and Letters students upon approval by a dean in the Office for Undergraduate Studies. Students are required to provide a goals and objectives statement and to obtain a letter of offer for the internship in advance of beginning the internship, to keep a daily journal over the course of the internship, to have a letter of evaluation provided upon completion of duties, and to write a reflection paper.

  • Arts and Letters (Non-dept.)
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1519
  • 0 of 3 enrolled
  • ZINT,

Darlene Hampton

AL 45999 | Summer Internship
Darlene Hampton

Credit toward graduation for up to two internships is available for College of Arts and Letters students upon approval by a dean in the Office for Undergraduate Studies. Students are required to provide a goals and objectives statement and to obtain a letter of offer for the internship in advance of beginning the internship, to keep a daily journal over the course of the internship, to have a letter of evaluation provided upon completion of duties, and to write a reflection paper.

  • Arts and Letters (Non-dept.)
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1520
  • 0 of 3 enrolled
  • ZINT,

Mary O'Callaghan

AL 45999 | Summer Internship
Mary O'Callaghan

Credit toward graduation for up to two internships is available for College of Arts and Letters students upon approval by a dean in the Office for Undergraduate Studies. Students are required to provide a goals and objectives statement and to obtain a letter of offer for the internship in advance of beginning the internship, to keep a daily journal over the course of the internship, to have a letter of evaluation provided upon completion of duties, and to write a reflection paper.

  • Arts and Letters (Non-dept.)
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1521
  • 0 of 3 enrolled
  • ZINT,

John Goodwine

AME 40498 | Spc.Stud.Int'l Collab.Indus P
John Goodwine

In this course students will work in teams comprised of students from Notre Dame and universities in countries other than in the United States. The teams will complete projects provided by multinational companies working in industries related to aerospace or mechanical engineering. Periodic reporting requirements, design reviews and final project presentations consistent with industrial practice are required both to the academic supervisor as well as the industrial sponsor of the project.

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1051
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • MET,

John Goodwine

AME 47560 | Independent UG Design Project
John Goodwine

A design project at the undergraduate level under the supervision of a faculty member.

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1061
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

John Goodwine

AME 48491 | Undergraduate Research
John Goodwine

A research project at the undergraduate level under the supervision of a faculty member.

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1062
  • 0 of 15 enrolled
  • ZUG1,

John Goodwine

AME 67099 | Special Studies
John Goodwine

Individual or small group study under the direction of a faculty member in a graduate subject not currently covered by any University course. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1063
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

John Goodwine

AME 67890 | Independent Summer Research
John Goodwine

This course is for graduate students receiving a summer stipend and conducting independent research. Registering for this course will ensure proper classification for tax purposes. Only those students both actively engaged in research and receiving a stipend are eligible for this course.

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1064
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Kenneth Christensen

AME 68691 | Thesis Research
Kenneth Christensen

This course is reserved for the six-credit-hour thesis requirement of the research master's degree. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1023
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Thomas Corke

AME 68691 | Thesis Research
Thomas Corke

This course is reserved for the six-credit-hour thesis requirement of the research master's degree. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1067
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

David Go

AME 68691 | Thesis Research
David Go

This course is reserved for the six-credit-hour thesis requirement of the research master's degree. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1068
  • 0 of 8 enrolled
  • ,

John Goodwine

AME 68691 | Thesis Research
John Goodwine

This course is reserved for the six-credit-hour thesis requirement of the research master's degree. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1069
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Eric Jumper

AME 68691 | Thesis Research
Eric Jumper

This course is reserved for the six-credit-hour thesis requirement of the research master's degree. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1070
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Tengfei Luo

AME 68691 | Thesis Research
Tengfei Luo

This course is reserved for the six-credit-hour thesis requirement of the research master's degree. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1071
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Karel Matous

AME 68691 | Thesis Research
Karel Matous

This course is reserved for the six-credit-hour thesis requirement of the research master's degree. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1072
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Scott Morris

AME 68691 | Thesis Research
Scott Morris

This course is reserved for the six-credit-hour thesis requirement of the research master's degree. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1073
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Glen Niebur

AME 68691 | Thesis Research
Glen Niebur

This course is reserved for the six-credit-hour thesis requirement of the research master's degree. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1074
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Timothy Ovaert

AME 68691 | Thesis Research
Timothy Ovaert

This course is reserved for the six-credit-hour thesis requirement of the research master's degree. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1075
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Joseph Powers

AME 68691 | Thesis Research
Joseph Powers

This course is reserved for the six-credit-hour thesis requirement of the research master's degree. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1076
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Ryan Roeder

AME 68691 | Thesis Research
Ryan Roeder

This course is reserved for the six-credit-hour thesis requirement of the research master's degree. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1077
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

James Schmiedeler

AME 68691 | Thesis Research
James Schmiedeler

This course is reserved for the six-credit-hour thesis requirement of the research master's degree. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1078
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Flint Thomas

AME 68691 | Thesis Research
Flint Thomas

This course is reserved for the six-credit-hour thesis requirement of the research master's degree. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1079
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Meng Wang

AME 68691 | Thesis Research
Meng Wang

This course is reserved for the six-credit-hour thesis requirement of the research master's degree. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1080
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Nicholas Zabaras

AME 68691 | Thesis Research
Nicholas Zabaras

This course is reserved for the six-credit-hour thesis requirement of the research master's degree. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1081
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Stanislav Gordeyev

AME 68691 | Thesis Research
Stanislav Gordeyev

This course is reserved for the six-credit-hour thesis requirement of the research master's degree. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1082
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Thomas Juliano

AME 68691 | Thesis Research
Thomas Juliano

This course is reserved for the six-credit-hour thesis requirement of the research master's degree. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1083
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Edward Kinzel

AME 68691 | Thesis Research
Edward Kinzel

This course is reserved for the six-credit-hour thesis requirement of the research master's degree. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1084
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Ryan McClarren

AME 68691 | Thesis Research
Ryan McClarren

This course is reserved for the six-credit-hour thesis requirement of the research master's degree. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1085
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Svetlana Neretina

AME 68691 | Thesis Research
Svetlana Neretina

This course is reserved for the six-credit-hour thesis requirement of the research master's degree. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1086
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Hirotaka Sakaue

AME 68691 | Thesis Research
Hirotaka Sakaue

This course is reserved for the six-credit-hour thesis requirement of the research master's degree. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1087
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Michael Stanisic

AME 68691 | Thesis Research
Michael Stanisic

This course is reserved for the six-credit-hour thesis requirement of the research master's degree. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1088
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Yanliang Zhang

AME 68691 | Thesis Research
Yanliang Zhang

This course is reserved for the six-credit-hour thesis requirement of the research master's degree. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1089
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Pinar Zorlutuna

AME 68691 | Thesis Research
Pinar Zorlutuna

This course is reserved for the six-credit-hour thesis requirement of the research master's degree. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1090
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Donny Hanjaya Putra

AME 68691 | Thesis Research
Donny Hanjaya Putra

This course is reserved for the six-credit-hour thesis requirement of the research master's degree. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1091
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Maria Holland

AME 68691 | Thesis Research
Maria Holland

This course is reserved for the six-credit-hour thesis requirement of the research master's degree. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1092
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Jonathan MacArt

AME 68691 | Thesis Research
Jonathan MacArt

This course is reserved for the six-credit-hour thesis requirement of the research master's degree. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1093
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Mark Plecnik

AME 68691 | Thesis Research
Mark Plecnik

This course is reserved for the six-credit-hour thesis requirement of the research master's degree. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1094
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Jian-Xun Wang

AME 68691 | Thesis Research
Jian-Xun Wang

This course is reserved for the six-credit-hour thesis requirement of the research master's degree. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1095
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Patrick Wensing

AME 68691 | Thesis Research
Patrick Wensing

This course is reserved for the six-credit-hour thesis requirement of the research master's degree. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1096
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Sangpil Yoon

AME 68691 | Thesis Research
Sangpil Yoon

This course is reserved for the six-credit-hour thesis requirement of the research master's degree. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1097
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Matthew Zahr

AME 68691 | Thesis Research
Matthew Zahr

This course is reserved for the six-credit-hour thesis requirement of the research master's degree. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1098
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Kenneth Christensen

AME 68697 | Nonresident Thesis Research
Kenneth Christensen

For master's degree students. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1024
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Thomas Corke

AME 68697 | Nonresident Thesis Research
Thomas Corke

For master's degree students. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1099
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

David Go

AME 68697 | Nonresident Thesis Research
David Go

For master's degree students. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1100
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

John Goodwine

AME 68697 | Nonresident Thesis Research
John Goodwine

For master's degree students. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1101
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Eric Jumper

AME 68697 | Nonresident Thesis Research
Eric Jumper

For master's degree students. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1102
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Tengfei Luo

AME 68697 | Nonresident Thesis Research
Tengfei Luo

For master's degree students. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1103
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Karel Matous

AME 68697 | Nonresident Thesis Research
Karel Matous

For master's degree students. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1104
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Scott Morris

AME 68697 | Nonresident Thesis Research
Scott Morris

For master's degree students. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1105
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Glen Niebur

AME 68697 | Nonresident Thesis Research
Glen Niebur

For master's degree students. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1106
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Timothy Ovaert

AME 68697 | Nonresident Thesis Research
Timothy Ovaert

For master's degree students. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1107
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Joseph Powers

AME 68697 | Nonresident Thesis Research
Joseph Powers

For master's degree students. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1108
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Ryan Roeder

AME 68697 | Nonresident Thesis Research
Ryan Roeder

For master's degree students. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1109
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

James Schmiedeler

AME 68697 | Nonresident Thesis Research
James Schmiedeler

For master's degree students. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1110
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Flint Thomas

AME 68697 | Nonresident Thesis Research
Flint Thomas

For master's degree students. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1111
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Meng Wang

AME 68697 | Nonresident Thesis Research
Meng Wang

For master's degree students. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1112
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Nicholas Zabaras

AME 68697 | Nonresident Thesis Research
Nicholas Zabaras

For master's degree students. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1113
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Stanislav Gordeyev

AME 68697 | Nonresident Thesis Research
Stanislav Gordeyev

For master's degree students. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1114
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Thomas Juliano

AME 68697 | Nonresident Thesis Research
Thomas Juliano

For master's degree students. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1115
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Edward Kinzel

AME 68697 | Nonresident Thesis Research
Edward Kinzel

For master's degree students. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1116
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Ryan McClarren

AME 68697 | Nonresident Thesis Research
Ryan McClarren

For master's degree students. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1117
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Svetlana Neretina

AME 68697 | Nonresident Thesis Research
Svetlana Neretina

For master's degree students. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1118
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Hirotaka Sakaue

AME 68697 | Nonresident Thesis Research
Hirotaka Sakaue

For master's degree students. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1119
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Michael Stanisic

AME 68697 | Nonresident Thesis Research
Michael Stanisic

For master's degree students. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1120
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Yanliang Zhang

AME 68697 | Nonresident Thesis Research
Yanliang Zhang

For master's degree students. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1121
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Pinar Zorlutuna

AME 68697 | Nonresident Thesis Research
Pinar Zorlutuna

For master's degree students. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1122
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Donny Hanjaya Putra

AME 68697 | Nonresident Thesis Research
Donny Hanjaya Putra

For master's degree students. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1123
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Maria Holland

AME 68697 | Nonresident Thesis Research
Maria Holland

For master's degree students. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1124
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Jonathan MacArt

AME 68697 | Nonresident Thesis Research
Jonathan MacArt

For master's degree students. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1125
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Mark Plecnik

AME 68697 | Nonresident Thesis Research
Mark Plecnik

For master's degree students. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1126
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Jian-Xun Wang

AME 68697 | Nonresident Thesis Research
Jian-Xun Wang

For master's degree students. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1127
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Patrick Wensing

AME 68697 | Nonresident Thesis Research
Patrick Wensing

For master's degree students. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1128
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Sangpil Yoon

AME 68697 | Nonresident Thesis Research
Sangpil Yoon

For master's degree students. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1129
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Matthew Zahr

AME 68697 | Nonresident Thesis Research
Matthew Zahr

For master's degree students. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1130
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Kenneth Christensen

AME 98991 | Dissertation Research
Kenneth Christensen

Required for candidates for the advanced degree in the research program. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1065
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Thomas Corke

AME 98991 | Dissertation Research
Thomas Corke

Required for candidates for the advanced degree in the research program. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1131
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

David Go

AME 98991 | Dissertation Research
David Go

Required for candidates for the advanced degree in the research program. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1132
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

John Goodwine

AME 98991 | Dissertation Research
John Goodwine

Required for candidates for the advanced degree in the research program. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1133
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Eric Jumper

AME 98991 | Dissertation Research
Eric Jumper

Required for candidates for the advanced degree in the research program. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1134
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Tengfei Luo

AME 98991 | Dissertation Research
Tengfei Luo

Required for candidates for the advanced degree in the research program. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1135
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Karel Matous

AME 98991 | Dissertation Research
Karel Matous

Required for candidates for the advanced degree in the research program. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1136
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Scott Morris

AME 98991 | Dissertation Research
Scott Morris

Required for candidates for the advanced degree in the research program. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1137
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Glen Niebur

AME 98991 | Dissertation Research
Glen Niebur

Required for candidates for the advanced degree in the research program. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1138
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Timothy Ovaert

AME 98991 | Dissertation Research
Timothy Ovaert

Required for candidates for the advanced degree in the research program. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1139
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Joseph Powers

AME 98991 | Dissertation Research
Joseph Powers

Required for candidates for the advanced degree in the research program. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1140
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Ryan Roeder

AME 98991 | Dissertation Research
Ryan Roeder

Required for candidates for the advanced degree in the research program. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1141
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

James Schmiedeler

AME 98991 | Dissertation Research
James Schmiedeler

Required for candidates for the advanced degree in the research program. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1142
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Flint Thomas

AME 98991 | Dissertation Research
Flint Thomas

Required for candidates for the advanced degree in the research program. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1143
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Meng Wang

AME 98991 | Dissertation Research
Meng Wang

Required for candidates for the advanced degree in the research program. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1144
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Nicholas Zabaras

AME 98991 | Dissertation Research
Nicholas Zabaras

Required for candidates for the advanced degree in the research program. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1145
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Stanislav Gordeyev

AME 98991 | Dissertation Research
Stanislav Gordeyev

Required for candidates for the advanced degree in the research program. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1146
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Thomas Juliano

AME 98991 | Dissertation Research
Thomas Juliano

Required for candidates for the advanced degree in the research program. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1147
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Edward Kinzel

AME 98991 | Dissertation Research
Edward Kinzel

Required for candidates for the advanced degree in the research program. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1148
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Ryan McClarren

AME 98991 | Dissertation Research
Ryan McClarren

Required for candidates for the advanced degree in the research program. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1149
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Svetlana Neretina

AME 98991 | Dissertation Research
Svetlana Neretina

Required for candidates for the advanced degree in the research program. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1150
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Hirotaka Sakaue

AME 98991 | Dissertation Research
Hirotaka Sakaue

Required for candidates for the advanced degree in the research program. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1151
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Michael Stanisic

AME 98991 | Dissertation Research
Michael Stanisic

Required for candidates for the advanced degree in the research program. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1152
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Yanliang Zhang

AME 98991 | Dissertation Research
Yanliang Zhang

Required for candidates for the advanced degree in the research program. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1153
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Pinar Zorlutuna

AME 98991 | Dissertation Research
Pinar Zorlutuna

Required for candidates for the advanced degree in the research program. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1154
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Donny Hanjaya Putra

AME 98991 | Dissertation Research
Donny Hanjaya Putra

Required for candidates for the advanced degree in the research program. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1155
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Maria Holland

AME 98991 | Dissertation Research
Maria Holland

Required for candidates for the advanced degree in the research program. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1156
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Jonathan MacArt

AME 98991 | Dissertation Research
Jonathan MacArt

Required for candidates for the advanced degree in the research program. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1157
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Mark Plecnik

AME 98991 | Dissertation Research
Mark Plecnik

Required for candidates for the advanced degree in the research program. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1158
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Jian-Xun Wang

AME 98991 | Dissertation Research
Jian-Xun Wang

Required for candidates for the advanced degree in the research program. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1159
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Patrick Wensing

AME 98991 | Dissertation Research
Patrick Wensing

Required for candidates for the advanced degree in the research program. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1160
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Sangpil Yoon

AME 98991 | Dissertation Research
Sangpil Yoon

Required for candidates for the advanced degree in the research program. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1161
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Matthew Zahr

AME 98991 | Dissertation Research
Matthew Zahr

Required for candidates for the advanced degree in the research program. (Every semester)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1162
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Kenneth Christensen

AME 98998 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch
Kenneth Christensen

This course is reserved to provide the required continuing minimal registration of one credit hour per academic semester for nonresident graduate students who wish to retain their degree status. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1066
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Thomas Corke

AME 98998 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch
Thomas Corke

This course is reserved to provide the required continuing minimal registration of one credit hour per academic semester for nonresident graduate students who wish to retain their degree status. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1165
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

David Go

AME 98998 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch
David Go

This course is reserved to provide the required continuing minimal registration of one credit hour per academic semester for nonresident graduate students who wish to retain their degree status. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1166
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

John Goodwine

AME 98998 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch
John Goodwine

This course is reserved to provide the required continuing minimal registration of one credit hour per academic semester for nonresident graduate students who wish to retain their degree status. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1167
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Eric Jumper

AME 98998 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch
Eric Jumper

This course is reserved to provide the required continuing minimal registration of one credit hour per academic semester for nonresident graduate students who wish to retain their degree status. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1168
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Tengfei Luo

AME 98998 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch
Tengfei Luo

This course is reserved to provide the required continuing minimal registration of one credit hour per academic semester for nonresident graduate students who wish to retain their degree status. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1169
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Karel Matous

AME 98998 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch
Karel Matous

This course is reserved to provide the required continuing minimal registration of one credit hour per academic semester for nonresident graduate students who wish to retain their degree status. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1170
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Scott Morris

AME 98998 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch
Scott Morris

This course is reserved to provide the required continuing minimal registration of one credit hour per academic semester for nonresident graduate students who wish to retain their degree status. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1171
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Glen Niebur

AME 98998 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch
Glen Niebur

This course is reserved to provide the required continuing minimal registration of one credit hour per academic semester for nonresident graduate students who wish to retain their degree status. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1172
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Timothy Ovaert

AME 98998 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch
Timothy Ovaert

This course is reserved to provide the required continuing minimal registration of one credit hour per academic semester for nonresident graduate students who wish to retain their degree status. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1173
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Joseph Powers

AME 98998 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch
Joseph Powers

This course is reserved to provide the required continuing minimal registration of one credit hour per academic semester for nonresident graduate students who wish to retain their degree status. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1174
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Ryan Roeder

AME 98998 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch
Ryan Roeder

This course is reserved to provide the required continuing minimal registration of one credit hour per academic semester for nonresident graduate students who wish to retain their degree status. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1175
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

James Schmiedeler

AME 98998 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch
James Schmiedeler

This course is reserved to provide the required continuing minimal registration of one credit hour per academic semester for nonresident graduate students who wish to retain their degree status. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1176
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Flint Thomas

AME 98998 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch
Flint Thomas

This course is reserved to provide the required continuing minimal registration of one credit hour per academic semester for nonresident graduate students who wish to retain their degree status. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1177
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Meng Wang

AME 98998 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch
Meng Wang

This course is reserved to provide the required continuing minimal registration of one credit hour per academic semester for nonresident graduate students who wish to retain their degree status. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1178
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Nicholas Zabaras

AME 98998 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch
Nicholas Zabaras

This course is reserved to provide the required continuing minimal registration of one credit hour per academic semester for nonresident graduate students who wish to retain their degree status. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1179
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Stanislav Gordeyev

AME 98998 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch
Stanislav Gordeyev

This course is reserved to provide the required continuing minimal registration of one credit hour per academic semester for nonresident graduate students who wish to retain their degree status. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1180
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Thomas Juliano

AME 98998 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch
Thomas Juliano

This course is reserved to provide the required continuing minimal registration of one credit hour per academic semester for nonresident graduate students who wish to retain their degree status. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1181
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Edward Kinzel

AME 98998 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch
Edward Kinzel

This course is reserved to provide the required continuing minimal registration of one credit hour per academic semester for nonresident graduate students who wish to retain their degree status. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1182
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Ryan McClarren

AME 98998 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch
Ryan McClarren

This course is reserved to provide the required continuing minimal registration of one credit hour per academic semester for nonresident graduate students who wish to retain their degree status. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1183
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Svetlana Neretina

AME 98998 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch
Svetlana Neretina

This course is reserved to provide the required continuing minimal registration of one credit hour per academic semester for nonresident graduate students who wish to retain their degree status. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1184
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Hirotaka Sakaue

AME 98998 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch
Hirotaka Sakaue

This course is reserved to provide the required continuing minimal registration of one credit hour per academic semester for nonresident graduate students who wish to retain their degree status. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1185
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

AME 98998 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch

This course is reserved to provide the required continuing minimal registration of one credit hour per academic semester for nonresident graduate students who wish to retain their degree status. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1186
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Yanliang Zhang

AME 98998 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch
Yanliang Zhang

This course is reserved to provide the required continuing minimal registration of one credit hour per academic semester for nonresident graduate students who wish to retain their degree status. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1187
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Pinar Zorlutuna

AME 98998 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch
Pinar Zorlutuna

This course is reserved to provide the required continuing minimal registration of one credit hour per academic semester for nonresident graduate students who wish to retain their degree status. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1188
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Donny Hanjaya Putra

AME 98998 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch
Donny Hanjaya Putra

This course is reserved to provide the required continuing minimal registration of one credit hour per academic semester for nonresident graduate students who wish to retain their degree status. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1189
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Maria Holland

AME 98998 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch
Maria Holland

This course is reserved to provide the required continuing minimal registration of one credit hour per academic semester for nonresident graduate students who wish to retain their degree status. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1190
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Jonathan MacArt

AME 98998 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch
Jonathan MacArt

This course is reserved to provide the required continuing minimal registration of one credit hour per academic semester for nonresident graduate students who wish to retain their degree status. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1191
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Mark Plecnik

AME 98998 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch
Mark Plecnik

This course is reserved to provide the required continuing minimal registration of one credit hour per academic semester for nonresident graduate students who wish to retain their degree status. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1192
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Jian-Xun Wang

AME 98998 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch
Jian-Xun Wang

This course is reserved to provide the required continuing minimal registration of one credit hour per academic semester for nonresident graduate students who wish to retain their degree status. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1193
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Patrick Wensing

AME 98998 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch
Patrick Wensing

This course is reserved to provide the required continuing minimal registration of one credit hour per academic semester for nonresident graduate students who wish to retain their degree status. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1194
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Sangpil Yoon

AME 98998 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch
Sangpil Yoon

This course is reserved to provide the required continuing minimal registration of one credit hour per academic semester for nonresident graduate students who wish to retain their degree status. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1195
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Matthew Zahr

AME 98998 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch
Matthew Zahr

This course is reserved to provide the required continuing minimal registration of one credit hour per academic semester for nonresident graduate students who wish to retain their degree status. (As needed)

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1196
  • 0 of 7 enrolled
  • ,

Vania Smith Allen

ANTH 10203 | Global Cultural Worlds
Vania Smith Allen

This class is designed to introduce anthropology as a lens to analyze the human condition and the diversity of human expression. We will also identify key topical themes and interests in cultural anthropology including an overview of its history and methods. Anthropology illuminates the myriad of cultural patterns and social systems throughout the world. Expressed through ethnography, anthropology reveals a vast variety of global cultural phenomena that reveal complex social patterns and the stunning vibrancy of ways we can live and view life. The course explores human action through multiple holistic lenses including culture concepts, kinship patterns, economic strategies, political practices, religious rituals, artistic performances, gender roles, ethnic identities, communicative languages, medical systems, patterns of violence, and the legacies of globalization.

  • Anthropology
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1266
  • 0 of 2 enrolled
  • ALSS,GLBC,OLF,ZFTY,ZFYS,ZODO, SOSC,WKSS

Vania Smith Allen

ANTH 20203 | Global Cultural Worlds
Vania Smith Allen

This course introduces students to the field of social-cultural anthropology. Cultural anthropologists are primarily interested in exploring issues of human cultural diversity across cultures and through time. This course will explore key theoretical, topical, and ethical issues of interest to cultural anthropologists. We will examine diverse ways in which people around the globe have constructed social organizations (such as kinship, and political and economic systems) and cultural identities (such as gender, ethnicity, nationality, race, and class) and we will consider the impact of increasing globalization on such processes. Throughout the course we will consider how different anthropologists go about their work as they engage in research and as they represent others through the writing of ethnographies.

  • Anthropology
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1265
  • 0 of 15 enrolled
  • ALSS,GLBC,OLF,ZODO,ZTST, SOSC,WKSS

Jeffrey Peterson

ANTH 24201 | Fundamentals of Bio Anth
Jeffrey Peterson

This course approaches human evolution from a theoretical point of view that combines both biological and cultural processes into a cohesive bio-cultural model. It begins by tracing the development of modern evolutionary theory and the place of evolutionary studies in anthropology, especially in the sub-field of bioanthropology. These concepts provide the framework for understanding the many lines of evidence that anthropologists use to explore and explain human evolution. These include studies of our primate relatives, through the intricacies of the fossil record, to archaeological evidence for the invention of material culture from the simplest stone tools to the complex cultural world that we live in today. Modern human variation can only be explained as the result of evolutionary forces acting on the complex interplay of biology and culture over millions of years. We continue to be affected by these forces, and this course not only provides information about where we came from, it also provides the scientific backgrounds to help us understand where we might be going as our species continues to evolve.

  • Anthropology
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1586
  • 0 of 15 enrolled
  • TWR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM 05/31 - 07/23
  • ALSS,NSBH,OLF,ZODO,ZTST,

ANTH 46100 | Dir Readings - Biological Anth

Intensive independent readings on a special problem area in biological anthropology about which the student will be expected to produce a detailed annotated bibliography and write a scholarly paper.

  • Anthropology
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1232
  • 0 of 2 enrolled
  • ,

ANTH 46200 | Dir Readings - Medical Anth

Intensive independent readings on a special problem area in medical anthropology about which the student will be expected to produce a detailed annotated bibliography and write a scholarly paper.

  • Anthropology
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1233
  • 0 of 2 enrolled
  • ,

ANTH 46300 | Dir Readings - Sociocultural

Intensive independent readings on a special problem area in sociocultural anthropology about which the student will be expected to produce a detailed annotated bibliography and write a scholarly paper.

  • Anthropology
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1234
  • 0 of 2 enrolled
  • ,

ANTH 46400 | Dir Readings - Linguistic Anth

Intensive independent readings on a special problem area in linguistic anthropology about which the student will be expected to produce a detailed annotated bibliography and write a scholarly paper.

  • Anthropology
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1235
  • 0 of 2 enrolled
  • ,

ANTH 46500 | Dir Readings - Archaeology

Intensive independent readings on a special problem area in archaeology about which the student will be expected to produce a detailed annotated bibliography and write a scholarly paper.

  • Anthropology
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1236
  • 0 of 2 enrolled
  • ,

ANTH 46700 | Dir Readings in Anthropology

Intensive independent readings on a special problem area in anthropology about which the student will be expected to produce a detailed annotated bibliography, write a scholarly paper, or research report.

  • Anthropology
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1237
  • 0 of 2 enrolled
  • ,

ANTH 48100 | Dir Research - Biological

Intensive independent research on a special problem area in biological anthropology, about which the student will be expected to produce a detailed annotated bibliography and write a scholarly paper.

  • Anthropology
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1238
  • 0 of 2 enrolled
  • ZUG1,

ANTH 48110 | Dir Research - Bioarchaeology

Intensive independent research on a special problem area in biological anthropology and/or archaeology, about which the student will be expected to produce a detailed annotated bibliography and write a scholarly paper.

  • Anthropology
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1239
  • 0 of 2 enrolled
  • ZUG1,

ANTH 48200 | Dir Research - Medical Anth

Intensive independent research on a special problem area in medical anthropology, about which the student will be expected to produce a detailed annotated bibliography and write a scholarly paper.

  • Anthropology
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1240
  • 0 of 2 enrolled
  • ZUG1,

ANTH 48300 | Dir Research - Sociocultural

Intensive independent research on a special problem area in socio-cultural anthropology, about which the student will be expected to produce a detailed annotated bibliography and write a scholarly paper.

  • Anthropology
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1241
  • 0 of 2 enrolled
  • ZUG1,

ANTH 48400 | Dir Research - Linguistic Anth

Intensive independent research on a special problem area in linguistic anthropology, about which the student will be expected to produce a detailed annotated bibliography and write a scholarly paper.

  • Anthropology
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1242
  • 0 of 2 enrolled
  • ,

ANTH 48500 | Dir Research - Archaeology

Intensive independent research on a special problem area in archaeology, about which the student will be expected to produce a detailed annotated bibliography and write a scholarly paper.

  • Anthropology
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1243
  • 0 of 2 enrolled
  • ZUG1,

ANTH 48700 | Dir Research in Anthropology

Intensive independent research on a special problem area in anthropology, about which the student will be expected to produce a detailed annotated bibliography, write a scholarly paper, or research report.

  • Anthropology
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1244
  • 0 of 2 enrolled
  • ,

ANTH 66200 | Dir Readings - Medical Anth

Intensive independent readings on a special problem area in medical anthropology about which the student will be expected to produce a detailed annotated bibliography and write a scholarly paper.

  • Anthropology
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1246
  • 0 of 2 enrolled
  • ,

ANTH 66300 | Dir Readings - Sociocultural

Intensive independent readings on a special problem area in sociocultural anthropology about which the student will be expected to produce a detailed annotated bibliography and write a scholarly paper.

  • Anthropology
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1247
  • 0 of 2 enrolled
  • ,

Maureen Collins

ANTH 67111 | Independent Summer Research
Maureen Collins

This course is for graduate students receiving a summer stipend and conducting independent research. Registering for this course will ensure proper classification for tax purposes. Only those students both actively engaged in research and receiving a stipend are eligible for this course.

  • Anthropology
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1002
  • 0 of 25 enrolled
  • ,

ARCH 45999 | Professional Internship

Internship credit in the School of Architecture for full time summer employment (40 hours per week minimum) for a minimum of eight weeks. Students must have a firm job offer before being given permission to enroll. In addition to the successful completion of employment, students must submit weekly reflections to the instructor on a series of questions relating the employment experience to the academic program.

  • Architecture
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1395
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ZINT,

Samantha Salden Teach

ARCH 61011 | Intro to Arch Representation
Samantha Salden Teach

Instruction in the techniques of traditional architectural drawing and presentation. Required of all incoming graduate students, except by special arrangement.

  • Architecture
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1394
  • 0 of 15 enrolled
  • MTWRF 09:00 AM-05:00 PM 06/14 - 07/23
  • ,

Sara Fahling

ART 24402 | Photography I
Sara Fahling

BA Core Option/BFA Core. MATERIALS FEE. This course is an introduction to the theory and practice of still photography. It is designed for all students interested in developing their photographic skills and also serves as the entry-level sequence for the photo major in studio art. The course is based on the use of digital cameras. Adobe Lightroom software and professional quality inkjet printing. Creative assignments introduce students to various thematic approaches including documentary work and portraits. Presentations cover both historical and contemporary approaches to the medium. A digital SLR camera with manual controls is highly recommended. Or, students may check out departmental cameras to complete assignments. A portable hard drive compatible with the Apple OS platform is required for storing personal files.

  • Art Studio
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1547
  • 0 of 15 enrolled
  • MWR 01:00 PM-03:00 PM 05/31 - 07/23
  • OLF,ZODO, FNAR,WKAR

Troy Aiken

ART 30101 | Multilevel Ceramics
Troy Aiken

In this multi-level class, you will become involved with the creative process of art through the medium of clay. Beginning and advanced techniques will be explored as you learn to produce pottery and sculptural forms in a variety of methods including hand building and wheel throwing. A basic understanding of clay and glaze composition along with firing methods will also be addressed. The goal of this course is for you to become familiar with the elements of art and the principles of design, to use these consciously in an attempt to refine your aesthetic sensibilities, and further your understanding of art. The major benefit in taking our summer course lies in the intensive nature of its structure. Meeting four days in a row each week for seven weeks affords a momentum and focus not easily realized in regular semesters. Tools, clay & glazes are included in the lab fee.

  • Art Studio
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1495
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • TBA 06/14 - 07/23
  • 3DCO,ZUG3,

ART 44770 | Arch. and Design in Berlin

Berlin is the ideal place for studying the development of architecture and design and their interrelationship. The city houses famous museums like Werkbundarchiv - Museum der Dinge, Bauhaus Archiv, Kunstgewerbe Museum (Museum of Applied Arts) and Br'han-Museum (Museum of Art and Design). The urban landscape is marked by an architecture created by great architects like Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, who also designed the famous Barcelona Chair. The historical overview starts with the 19th century and continues via Deutscher Werkbund (German Association of Craftsmen) towards the 20th century with the Bauhaus, and finally the latest developments in architecture and design in the 21st century.

  • Art Studio
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1398
  • 0 of 2 enrolled
  • ZOBG, FNAR,WKAR

Vania Smith Allen

ASIA 20203 | Global Cultural Worlds
Vania Smith Allen

This course introduces students to the field of social-cultural anthropology. Cultural anthropologists are primarily interested in exploring issues of human cultural diversity across cultures and through time. This course will explore key theoretical, topical, and ethical issues of interest to cultural anthropologists. We will examine diverse ways in which people around the globe have constructed social organizations (such as kinship, and political and economic systems) and cultural identities (such as gender, ethnicity, nationality, race, and class) and we will consider the impact of increasing globalization on such processes. Throughout the course we will consider how different anthropologists go about their work as they engage in research and as they represent others through the writing of ethnographies.

  • Asian Studies
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1267
  • 0 of 2 enrolled
  • ASSS, SOSC,WKSS

James O'Brien

ACCT 24150 | Bus Law Contracts & Agency
James O'Brien

Students taking this course will gain an understanding of the American legal system and learn fundamental rules of law, particularly of torts, contracts, sales, and agency. Students will develop an appreciation of how law affects business decision-making, of competing policy concerns underlying the law, and of ethical dimensions of legal issues and business situations. Required for all BA students. Course cannot be taken Pass/Fail.

  • Bus Admin - Business Law
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1329
  • 0 of 28 enrolled
  • MTWR 10:00 AM-11:15 AM 05/31 - 07/23
  • BA02,OLF,ZODO,ZTST,

Gina Shropshire

BA 37000 | Internship Special Studies
Gina Shropshire

Students pursue an individual study during their summer internship which relates directly to their major area of study, designed with and supervised by a member of the faculty, leading to the production of oral and written reports reflecting deeper theoretical and empirical understanding. The proposed course of study is not part of a standard curriculum for students in the Mendoza College of Business and cannot duplicate or substitute for an existing or regularly offered course. Students interested in pursuing this study must seek out a Mendoza College of Business faculty member affiliated with the subject matter who will then develop a specific timetable for consultations and submission or presentation of student work and will evaluate the final agreed upon deliverable(s) to determine successful completion of the course and assignment of a grade.

  • Business Administration - UG
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1389
  • 0 of 100 enrolled
  • ,

Joseph O'Tousa

BIOS 14110 | Biotechnology & Society
Joseph O'Tousa

Increased understanding of biological processes has fueled the development of new biotechnology. The course covers topics of current relevance, including the use of antibiotics, the development of genetically modified foods, genetic testing capabilities, stem cell technologies, cancer causes and treatments. Each topic is developed through reading assignments, instructor presentations, review of news media, and in class group interactions. A heightened awareness of the topic, and opposing viewpoints, will be developed through student debates and other in-class activities. Grading is based on class participation, online quizzes, assignments, and a final exam. <p> Note: this course is delivered fully online. The course design combines required live weekly meetings online with self-scheduled lectures, problems, assignments, and interactive learning materials. To participate, students will need to have a computer with webcam, reliable internet connection, and a quiet place to participate in live sessions.

  • Biological Sciences
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1280
  • 0 of 20 enrolled
  • MW 06:00 PM-07:30 PM 05/31 - 07/23
  • OLF,ZODO, NASC,WKST

Jeffrey Peterson

BIOS 20401 | Fundamentals of Bio Anth
Jeffrey Peterson

This course approaches human evolution from a theoretical point of view that combines both biological and cultural processes into a cohesive bio-cultural model. It begins by tracing the development of modern evolutionary theory and the place of evolutionary studies in anthropology, especially in the sub-field of bioanthropology. These concepts provide the framework for understanding the many lines of evidence that anthropologists use to explore and explain human evolution. These include studies of our primate relatives, through the intricacies of the fossil record, to archaeological evidence for the invention of material culture from the simplest stone tools to the complex cultural world that we live in today. Modern human variation can only be explained as the result of evolutionary forces acting on the complex interplay of biology and culture over millions of years. We continue to be affected by these forces, and this course not only provides information about where we came from, it also provides the scientific backgrounds to help us understand where we might be going as our species continues to evolve.

  • Biological Sciences
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1588
  • 0 of 6 enrolled
  • NSBH,

David Hyde

BIOS 24251 | Classical/Molec Gntcs
David Hyde

This course deals with two major areas. The first area is classical genetics: Mendelian principles, chromosome mechanics, linkage and recombination, and chromosomal mutations. The second area is molecular genetics: DNA replication, RNA transcription, protein translation, recombinant DNA techniques, the nature of the gene and regulation of gene expression. However, these areas are not mutually exclusive and often the same concept is applied at different times in the course. The integration of topics at different points throughout the course will help to reinforce the material for the student and demonstrate how our understanding of genetics has been built over time. Pre-requisites: Students are required to have completed a year-long Introductory Biology sequence prior to taking this genetics course. <b>BIOS or BCHM majors may only take this course when they receive permission from their Director of Undergraduate Studies. All majors must speak with their DUS: for BIOS, David Veselik (dveselik@nd.edu) / for BCHM, Dee Anne Goodenogh-Lashua (dgoodeno@nd.edu). <p> Note: this course is delivered fully online. The course design combines required live weekly meetings online with self-scheduled lectures, problems, assignments, and interactive learning materials. To participate, students will need to have a computer with webcam, reliable internet connection, and a quiet place to participate in live sessions.

  • Biological Sciences
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1281
  • 0 of 20 enrolled
  • TBA 05/31 - 07/23
  • CHSE,OLF,ZODO,

Troy Vogel

CBE 08999 | Research Experience HS
Troy Vogel

This is a zero-credit course for students engaged in independent research or working with a faculty member or a member of the University staff on a special project. Registration requires a brief description of the research or project to be pursued and the permission of the director of the Summer Session. No course work is required.

  • Chemical & Biomolecular Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1375
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Troy Vogel

CBE 28901 | Undergraduate Research
Troy Vogel

This is the course that freshmen and sophomore students should sign up for as their first experience in research. This is a one credit course, and involves a minimum commitment of 4-5 hours/wk. This course is S/U, may be taken more than once, but does not satisfy the Engineering/technical elective degree requirement.

  • Chemical & Biomolecular Engr.
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1376
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Troy Vogel

CBE 48901 | Undergraduate Research
Troy Vogel

This is the course that students should sign up for as their first experience in research. This is a one credit course, and involves a minimum commitment of 4-5 hours/wk. This course is S/U, may be taken more than once, but does not satisfy the Engineering/technical elective degree requirement.

  • Chemical & Biomolecular Engr.
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1377
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ZUG1,

Troy Vogel

CBE 48902 | Advanced UG Research
Troy Vogel

This is a three credit course on which students should expect to spend 12-15 hours per week. Successful completion of CBE 48901 or a summer (or academic year) research internship in the Department is a prerequisite for enrolling in CBE 48902. It can be counted as an Engineering/technical elective and students must produce a written report of their results at the end of the semester. This course is graded, and may be repeated.

  • Chemical & Biomolecular Engr.
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1378
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ZUG1,

Troy Vogel

CBE 48999 | Undergrad Research Experience
Troy Vogel

Registrar: This is a zero-credit course for students engaged in independent research or working with a faculty member of the University on a special project. No course work is required.

  • Chemical & Biomolecular Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1379
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Maureen Collins

CBE 67890 | Independent Summer Research
Maureen Collins

This course is for graduate students receiving a summer stipend and conducting independent research. Registering for this course will ensure proper classification for tax purposes. Only those students both actively engaged in research and receiving a stipend are eligible for this course.

  • Chemical & Biomolecular Engr.
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1390
  • 0 of 500 enrolled
  • ,

CDT 24510 | Robot Ethics

Robots or "autonomous systems" play an ever-increasing role in many areas, from weapons systems and driverless cars to health care and consumer services. As a result, it is ever more important to ask whether it makes any sense to speak of such systems' behaving ethically and how we can build into their programming what some call "ethics modules." After a brief technical introduction to the field, this course will approach these questions through contemporary philosophical literature on robot ethics and through popular media, including science fiction text and video. This is an online course with required, regular class sessions each week. Class meetings are online via Zoom webinar software (provided by the University). Note: this course is delivered fully online. The course design combines required live weekly meetings online with self-scheduled lectures, problems, assignments, and interactive learning materials. To participate, students will need to have a computer with webcam, reliable internet connection, and a quiet place to participate in live sessions.

  • Computing & Digtl Technologies
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1306
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • TBA 05/31 - 07/23
  • CDCS,CDDF,OLF,ZODO, PHI2,WKSP

Alan Huebner

CDT 24641 | R Programming
Alan Huebner

In this course, you will learn the foundational skills necessary in R that will enable you to acquire and manipulate data, complete exploratory data analysis (EDA), and create visualizations to communicate your findings. <p> Note: this course is delivered fully online. The course design combines required live weekly meetings online with self-scheduled lectures, problems, assignments, and interactive learning materials. To participate, students will need to have a computer with webcam, reliable internet connection, and a quiet place to participate in live sessions. <P> Students with other prerequisite courses or equivalent background preparation may enroll by permission of the instructor or permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies, Professor Alan Huebner (Alan.Huebner.10@nd.edu).

  • Computing & Digtl Technologies
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 1415
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • T 07:00 PM-09:00 PM 05/31 - 07/15
  • CDDF,CDTD,OLF,ZODO,

John Dillon

CDT 24642 | Python Programming
John Dillon

In this course, you will learn the foundational skills necessary inPython that will enable you to acquire and manipulate data, model data for the purposes of scientific analysis, and create visualizations to communicate your findings. The course willintroduce you to efficient scientific computing using NumPy. You will learn how to apply the pandas library to perform a variety of data manipulation tasks, including selecting, subsetting, combining, grouping, and aggregating data. You will also learn how to generate and customize visualizations with matplotlib. The course will give you the basic ideas and intuition behind modern data analysis methods and their applications, with a strong focuson a course project and weekly assignments. <p> Note: this course is delivered fully online. The course design combines required live weekly meetings online with self-scheduled lectures, problems, assignments, and interactive learning materials. To participate, students will need to have a computer with webcam, reliable internet connection, and a quiet place to participate in live sessions. <P> Students with other prerequisite courses or equivalent background preparation may enroll by permission of the instructor or permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies, Professor Alan Huebner (Alan.Huebner.10@nd.edu).

  • Computing & Digtl Technologies
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 1264
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • W 07:00 PM-09:00 PM 05/31 - 07/23
  • CDDF,CDTD,OLF,ZODO,

Alan Huebner

CDT 34643 | Prob & Stats: Data Sc
Alan Huebner

In this course, you will learn the fundamentals of probability theory and statistical inference used in data science. These foundational principles and techniques will allow you to transform data science problems into mathematical terms and validate them as statistical statements. <p> Note: this course is delivered fully online. The course design combines required live weekly meetings online with self-scheduled lectures, problems, assignments, and interactive learning materials. To participate, students will need to have a computer with webcam, reliable internet connection, and a quiet place to participate in live sessions. <P> Students with other prerequisite courses or equivalent background preparation may enroll by permission of the instructor or permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies, Professor Alan Huebner (Alan.Huebner.10@nd.edu).

  • Computing & Digtl Technologies
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1276
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • MW 08:00 PM-09:30 PM 05/31 - 07/23
  • CDDF,CDTD,OLF,ZODO,

CDT 44640 | Data Science

Data science can be viewed as the art and craft of extracting knowledge from large bodies of structured and unstructured data using methods from many disciplines, including (but not limited to) machine learning, databases, probability and statistics, information theory, and data visualization. This course will focus on the process of data science -- from data acquisition to analytics methods to deployment, and will walk the students through both the technical and use-case aspects in the process. It will place a larger emphasis on the machine learning component, with relevant inclusions and references from other disciplines. The course will give students an opportunity to implement and experiment with some of the concepts as part of a class project, in addition to the hands-on assignments using the Python programming language. Additionally, the course touches upon some of the advances in related topics such as big data and discuss the role of data mining in contemporary society. The course has been designed and developed by Nitesh Chawla, the Frank Freimann Professor of Computer Science and Engineering and Director of iCeNSA at the University of Notre Dame. <p> Note: this course is delivered fully online. The course design combines required live weekly meetings online with self-scheduled lectures, problems, assignments, and interactive learning materials. To participate, students will need to have a computer with webcam, reliable internet connection, and a quiet place to participate in live sessions. <p>Students enrolling in this course should have taken one or more courses or implemented one or more projects involving Python programming and one or more courses in probability or statistics. <p>Students enrolling in this course should have taken <b> <u> one or more</b> </u> courses or implemented <b> <u>one or more</b> </u> projects involving Python programming and <b> <u>one or more courses</b> </u> in probability or statistics.

  • Computing & Digtl Technologies
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1291
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • TBA 05/31 - 07/23
  • CDDF,CDTD,OLF,ZODO,

Yahya Kurama

CE 47600 | Special Studies
Yahya Kurama

Individual or small group study under the direction of a faculty member in an undergraduate subject not concurrently covered by any University course.

  • Civil Engineering
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1403
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Tracy Kijewski-Correa

CE 47600 | Special Studies
Tracy Kijewski-Correa

Individual or small group study under the direction of a faculty member in an undergraduate subject not concurrently covered by any University course.

  • Civil Engineering
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1404
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Ahsan Kareem

CE 47600 | Special Studies
Ahsan Kareem

Individual or small group study under the direction of a faculty member in an undergraduate subject not concurrently covered by any University course.

  • Civil Engineering
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1405
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Joannes Westerink

CE 47600 | Special Studies
Joannes Westerink

Individual or small group study under the direction of a faculty member in an undergraduate subject not concurrently covered by any University course.

  • Civil Engineering
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1406
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Kapil Khandelwal

CE 48600 | Undergraduate Research
Kapil Khandelwal

A research project at the undergraduate level under the supervision of a faculty member.

  • Civil Engineering
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1407
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ZUG1,

Andrew Kennedy

CE 48600 | Undergraduate Research
Andrew Kennedy

A research project at the undergraduate level under the supervision of a faculty member.

  • Civil Engineering
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1418
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ZUG1,

Alexandros Taflanidis

CE 48600 | Undergraduate Research
Alexandros Taflanidis

A research project at the undergraduate level under the supervision of a faculty member.

  • Civil Engineering
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1419
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ZUG1,

Diogo Bolster

CE 48600 | Undergraduate Research
Diogo Bolster

A research project at the undergraduate level under the supervision of a faculty member.

  • Civil Engineering
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1420
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ZUG1,

Peter Burns

CE 48600 | Undergraduate Research
Peter Burns

A research project at the undergraduate level under the supervision of a faculty member.

  • Civil Engineering
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1421
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ZUG1,

Harindra Fernando

CE 48600 | Undergraduate Research
Harindra Fernando

A research project at the undergraduate level under the supervision of a faculty member.

  • Civil Engineering
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1422
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ZUG1,

Melissa Berke

CE 48600 | Undergraduate Research
Melissa Berke

A research project at the undergraduate level under the supervision of a faculty member.

  • Civil Engineering
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1423
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ZUG1,

Jeremy Fein

CE 48600 | Undergraduate Research
Jeremy Fein

A research project at the undergraduate level under the supervision of a faculty member.

  • Civil Engineering
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1424
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ZUG1,

Amy Hixon

CE 48600 | Undergraduate Research
Amy Hixon

A research project at the undergraduate level under the supervision of a faculty member.

  • Civil Engineering
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1425
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ZUG1,

Clive Neal

CE 48600 | Undergraduate Research
Clive Neal

A research project at the undergraduate level under the supervision of a faculty member.

  • Civil Engineering
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1426
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ZUG1,

Antonio Simonetti

CE 48600 | Undergraduate Research
Antonio Simonetti

A research project at the undergraduate level under the supervision of a faculty member.

  • Civil Engineering
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1427
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ZUG1,

Ahsan Kareem

CE 48600 | Undergraduate Research
Ahsan Kareem

A research project at the undergraduate level under the supervision of a faculty member.

  • Civil Engineering
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1428
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ZUG1,

Tracy Kijewski-Correa

CE 48600 | Undergraduate Research
Tracy Kijewski-Correa

A research project at the undergraduate level under the supervision of a faculty member.

  • Civil Engineering
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1429
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ZUG1,

Yahya Kurama

CE 48600 | Undergraduate Research
Yahya Kurama

A research project at the undergraduate level under the supervision of a faculty member.

  • Civil Engineering
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1430
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ZUG1,

Ashley Thrall

CE 48600 | Undergraduate Research
Ashley Thrall

A research project at the undergraduate level under the supervision of a faculty member.

  • Civil Engineering
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1431
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ZUG1,

Kyle Doudrick

CE 48600 | Undergraduate Research
Kyle Doudrick

A research project at the undergraduate level under the supervision of a faculty member.

  • Civil Engineering
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1432
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ZUG1,

Alan Hamlet

CE 48600 | Undergraduate Research
Alan Hamlet

A research project at the undergraduate level under the supervision of a faculty member.

  • Civil Engineering
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1433
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ZUG1,

Robert Nerenberg

CE 48600 | Undergraduate Research
Robert Nerenberg

A research project at the undergraduate level under the supervision of a faculty member.

  • Civil Engineering
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1434
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ZUG1,

David Richter

CE 48600 | Undergraduate Research
David Richter

A research project at the undergraduate level under the supervision of a faculty member.

  • Civil Engineering
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1435
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ZUG1,

Joshua Shrout

CE 48600 | Undergraduate Research
Joshua Shrout

A research project at the undergraduate level under the supervision of a faculty member.

  • Civil Engineering
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1436
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ZUG1,

Joannes Westerink

CE 48600 | Undergraduate Research
Joannes Westerink

A research project at the undergraduate level under the supervision of a faculty member.

  • Civil Engineering
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1437
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ZUG1,

Ahsan Kareem

CE 67600 | Special Studies
Ahsan Kareem

Individual or small-group study under the direction of a faculty member in a graduate subject not concurrently covered by any University course.

  • Civil Engineering
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1438
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Yahya Kurama

CE 67600 | Special Studies
Yahya Kurama

Individual or small-group study under the direction of a faculty member in a graduate subject not concurrently covered by any University course.

  • Civil Engineering
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1439
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Joannes Westerink

CE 67600 | Special Studies
Joannes Westerink

Individual or small-group study under the direction of a faculty member in a graduate subject not concurrently covered by any University course.

  • Civil Engineering
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1440
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Kevin Walsh

CE 67600 | Special Studies
Kevin Walsh

Individual or small-group study under the direction of a faculty member in a graduate subject not concurrently covered by any University course.

  • Civil Engineering
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1441
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Maureen Collins

CE 67890 | Independent Summer Research
Maureen Collins

This course is for graduate students receiving a summer stipend and conducting independent research. Registering for this course will ensure proper classification for tax purposes. Only those students both actively engaged in research and receiving a stipend are eligible for this course.

  • Civil Engineering
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1442
  • 0 of 100 enrolled
  • ,

Joannes Westerink, Mollie Dash

CE 68600 | Thesis Direction
Joannes Westerink, Mollie Dash

Research to satisfy the six credit hours required for the research master's degree.

  • Civil Engineering
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1444
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Joannes Westerink

CE 68610 | Nonresident Thesis Research
Joannes Westerink

Required of nonresident graduate students who are completing their theses in absentia and who wish to retain their degree status.

  • Civil Engineering
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1443
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Joannes Westerink, Mollie Dash

CE 78600 | Research and Dissertation
Joannes Westerink, Mollie Dash

Research and dissertation for resident doctoral students

  • Civil Engineering
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1445
  • 0 of 20 enrolled
  • ,

Joannes Westerink, Mollie Dash

CE 78610 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch
Joannes Westerink, Mollie Dash

Required of nonresident graduate students who are completing their dissertations in absentia and who wish to retain their degree status.

  • Civil Engineering
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1446
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Kevin Koh

CHEM 10172 | Organic Structure & Reactivity
Kevin Koh

This class, generally taught in the Spring, is the first semester of a two-semester organic chemistry sequence intended for students in biological sciences and pre-professional studies. It is accompanied by laboratory work and by a tutorial section. The course provides a solid foundation in organic structure and bonding, spectroscopy, and Lewis acid/base reactions. These concepts are then applied to understand substitution and elimination reactions with a focus on mechanism and factors governing selectivity. A section of this course, taught in the Fall semester, is intended for chemical engineering students.

  • Chemistry and Biochemistry
  • 4.0 credits    CRN 1459
  • 0 of 72 enrolled
  • ZTST, NASC,WKST

Kevin Koh

CHEM 11172 | Structure and Reactivity Lab
Kevin Koh

Experimental work to accompany CHEM 10172.

  • Chemistry and Biochemistry
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1460
  • 0 of 72 enrolled
  • MW 01:30 PM-05:00 PM 06/14 - 07/23
  • ,

CHEM 20273 | Organic Reactions & Applicatio

A second semester covering the basic principles of organic chemistry, including structure, bonding, physical and chemical properties, reactive intermediates, and reaction mechanisms. Additional emphasis on applications of reactions in synthesis and relationships to biochemical systems and other associated areas of current interest. Intended primarily for pre-professional and biological science majors. This course is generally taken in the Fall semester with the laboratory CHEM 21273. A section is offered in the spring semester for chemical engineering students.

  • Chemistry and Biochemistry
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1461
  • 0 of 72 enrolled
  • MSCE,ZTST,

CHEM 21273 | Reactions and Applications Lab

Experiments to accompany CHEM 20273

  • Chemistry and Biochemistry
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1462
  • 0 of 72 enrolled
  • ,

Gregory Hartland

CHEM 78599 | Thesis Direction
Gregory Hartland

Research and reading for master's students

  • Chemistry and Biochemistry
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1455
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Gregory Hartland

CHEM 90697 | Directed Readings
Gregory Hartland

Reading and research on specialized topics that are immediately relevant to the student's interests and not routinely covered in the regular curriculum.

  • Chemistry and Biochemistry
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1463
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • CHSE,

Gregory Hartland

CHEM 98698 | Research and Dissertation
Gregory Hartland

Research and dissertation for resident doctoral students.

  • Chemistry and Biochemistry
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1456
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Gregory Hartland

CHEM 98699 | Visiting Student Research
Gregory Hartland

Research for visiting students.

  • Chemistry and Biochemistry
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1457
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Gregory Hartland

CHEM 98700 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch
Gregory Hartland

Required of nonresident graduate students who are completing their dissertations in absentia and who wish to retain their degree status.

  • Chemistry and Biochemistry
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1458
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • CHSE,

Maureen Collins

CLAS 67890 | Independent Summer Research
Maureen Collins

This course is for graduate students receiving a summer stipend and conducting independent research. Registering for this course will ensure proper classification for tax purposes. Only those students both actively engaged in research and receiving a stipend are eligible for this course.

  • Classics in Translation
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1005
  • 0 of 500 enrolled
  • ,

David Hernandez

CLAS 78598 | Summer Thesis Direction
David Hernandez

For students doing thesis work for a research master's degree.

  • Classics in Translation
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1006
  • 0 of 2 enrolled
  • ,

CLAS 10001 | Beginning Greek I

This two-semester sequence of courses introduces students to the language of the ancient Greeks for the first time. It emphasizes the fundamentals of ancient Greek grammar and vocabulary, and prepares students to read original Greek texts. An appreciation for ancient Greek culture is also fostered through secondary readings and class discussion.

  • Greek Language and Literature
  • 4.0 credits    CRN 1003
  • 0 of 15 enrolled
  • ZTST,

CLAS 10002 | Beginning Greek II

This two-semester sequence of courses introduces students to the language of the ancient Greeks for the first time. It emphasizes the fundamentals of ancient Greek grammar and vocabulary, and prepares students to read original Greek texts. An appreciation for ancient Greek culture is also fostered through secondary readings and class discussion.

  • Greek Language and Literature
  • 4.0 credits    CRN 1004
  • 0 of 15 enrolled
  • ZTST,

CLAS 20103 | Intermediate Greek

This second-year language course is designed for students who have taken one year of Beginning Greek or its equivalent. The course combines a review of grammar with careful reading of classical Greek authors including Lysias, Plato, and Homer. In addition to improving students' translating skills, this course introduces methods for studying Greek literature in its historical and cultural contexts, and it prepares students for more advanced work with a variety of ancient Greek literary genres. At the course's end students will be functioning independent readers of Greek.

  • Greek Language and Literature
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1007
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • LANG,MESE,SCLN,ZTST,

CLAS 60001 | Beginning Greek I

This two-semester sequence of courses introduces graduate students to the language of the ancient Greeks for the first time. It emphasizes the fundamentals of ancient Greek grammar and vocabulary, and prepares students to read original Greek texts. An appreciation for ancient Greek culture is also fostered through secondary readings and class discussion. CLGR 60001 is offered each fall semester and CLGR 60002 is offered each spring semester. (Both courses are offered in the Summer term.)

  • Greek Language and Literature
  • 4.0 credits    CRN 1008
  • 0 of 15 enrolled
  • ,

CLAS 60001 | Beginning Greek I

This two-semester sequence of courses introduces graduate students to the language of the ancient Greeks for the first time. It emphasizes the fundamentals of ancient Greek grammar and vocabulary, and prepares students to read original Greek texts. An appreciation for ancient Greek culture is also fostered through secondary readings and class discussion. CLGR 60001 is offered each fall semester and CLGR 60002 is offered each spring semester. (Both courses are offered in the Summer term.)

  • Greek Language and Literature
  • 4.0 credits    CRN 1013
  • 0 of 15 enrolled
  • OLF,ZODO,ZTST,

CLAS 60002 | Beginning Greek II

This two-semester sequence of courses introduces graduate students to the language of the ancient Greeks for the first time. It emphasizes the fundamentals of ancient Greek grammar and vocabulary, and prepares students to read original Greek texts. An appreciation for ancient Greek culture is also fostered through secondary readings and class discussion.

  • Greek Language and Literature
  • 4.0 credits    CRN 1009
  • 0 of 15 enrolled
  • ZTST,

CLAS 60002 | Beginning Greek II

This two-semester sequence of courses introduces graduate students to the language of the ancient Greeks for the first time. It emphasizes the fundamentals of ancient Greek grammar and vocabulary, and prepares students to read original Greek texts. An appreciation for ancient Greek culture is also fostered through secondary readings and class discussion.

  • Greek Language and Literature
  • 4.0 credits    CRN 1012
  • 0 of 15 enrolled
  • ZTST,

CLAS 60103 | Intermediate Greek

This second-year language course is designed for students who have taken one year of Beginning Greek or its equivalent. The course combines a review of grammar with careful reading of classical Greek authors including Lysias, Plato, and Homer. In addition to improving students' translating skills, this course introduces methods for studying Greek literature in its historical and cultural contexts, and it prepares students for more advanced work with a variety of ancient Greek literary genres. At the course's end students will be functioning independent readers of Greek.

  • Greek Language and Literature
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1010
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ZTST,

CLAS 60103 | Intermediate Greek

This second-year language course is designed for students who have taken one year of Beginning Greek or its equivalent. The course combines a review of grammar with careful reading of classical Greek authors including Lysias, Plato, and Homer. In addition to improving students' translating skills, this course introduces methods for studying Greek literature in its historical and cultural contexts, and it prepares students for more advanced work with a variety of ancient Greek literary genres. At the course's end students will be functioning independent readers of Greek.

  • Greek Language and Literature
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1011
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ZTST,

CLAS 10001 | Beginning Latin I

This Latin course initiates a two-semester sequence that introduces students to the language and culture of the ancient Romans. It emphasizes the fundamentals of Latin grammar and vocabulary, and prepares students to read original Latin texts. During the academic year, this course is taught as a hybrid course; a significant portion of the learning will be done by students working independently online. A deeper appreciation for English grammar and ancient Roman culture will be fostered through class discussion and attentive reading. This course is offered every semester.

  • Latin Language and Literature
  • 4.0 credits    CRN 1014
  • 0 of 15 enrolled
  • LALL,ZTST,

CLAS 10002 | Beginning Latin II

This two-semester sequence of courses introduces students to the language of the ancient Romans for the first time. It emphasizes the fundamentals of Latin grammar and vocabulary, and prepares students to read original Latin texts. An appreciation for ancient Roman culture is also fostered through secondary readings and class discussion.

  • Latin Language and Literature
  • 4.0 credits    CRN 1015
  • 0 of 15 enrolled
  • ZTST,

CLAS 20103 | Intermediate Latin

This course combines presentation of the remaining essentials of Latin grammar, reinforced through prose composition, with careful reading of Latin authors such as Caesar, Cornelius Nepos, Ovid, and Augustine. The course develops students' translating skills, introduces methods for studying Latin literature in its historical and cultural contexts, and prepares students for advanced work in Latin language and literature.

  • Latin Language and Literature
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1016
  • 0 of 9 enrolled
  • LANG,MESE,SCLN,ZTST,

CLAS 60001 | Beginning Latin I

This Latin course initiates a two-semester sequence that introduces students to the language and culture of the ancient Romans. It emphasizes the fundamentals of Latin grammar and vocabulary, and prepares students to read original Latin texts. During the academic year, this course is taught as a hybrid course; a significant portion of the learning will be done by students working independently online. A deeper appreciation for English grammar and ancient Roman culture will be fostered through class discussion and attentive reading. This course is offered every semester.

  • Latin Language and Literature
  • 4.0 credits    CRN 1017
  • 0 of 15 enrolled
  • LALL,ZTST,

CLAS 60001 | Beginning Latin I

This Latin course initiates a two-semester sequence that introduces students to the language and culture of the ancient Romans. It emphasizes the fundamentals of Latin grammar and vocabulary, and prepares students to read original Latin texts. During the academic year, this course is taught as a hybrid course; a significant portion of the learning will be done by students working independently online. A deeper appreciation for English grammar and ancient Roman culture will be fostered through class discussion and attentive reading. This course is offered every semester.

  • Latin Language and Literature
  • 4.0 credits    CRN 1018
  • 0 of 15 enrolled
  • LALL,ZTST,

CLAS 60002 | Beginning Latin II

This two-semester sequence of courses introduces students to the language of the ancient Romans for the first time. It emphasizes the fundamentals of Latin grammar and vocabulary, and prepares students to read original Latin texts. An appreciation for ancient Roman culture is also fostered through secondary readings and class discussion.

  • Latin Language and Literature
  • 4.0 credits    CRN 1019
  • 0 of 20 enrolled
  • ZTST,

CLAS 60002 | Beginning Latin II

This two-semester sequence of courses introduces students to the language of the ancient Romans for the first time. It emphasizes the fundamentals of Latin grammar and vocabulary, and prepares students to read original Latin texts. An appreciation for ancient Roman culture is also fostered through secondary readings and class discussion.

  • Latin Language and Literature
  • 4.0 credits    CRN 1020
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ZTST,

CLAS 60103 | Intermediate Latin

This course combines presentation of the remaining essentials of Latin grammar, reinforced through prose composition, with careful reading of Latin authors such as Caesar, Cornelius Nepos, Ovid, and Augustine. The course develops students' translating skills, introduces methods for studying Latin literature in its historical and cultural contexts, and prepares students for advanced work in Latin language and literature. Graduate students who wish to receive course credit should register under this number.

  • Latin Language and Literature
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1021
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ZTST,

CLAS 60103 | Intermediate Latin

This course combines presentation of the remaining essentials of Latin grammar, reinforced through prose composition, with careful reading of Latin authors such as Caesar, Cornelius Nepos, Ovid, and Augustine. The course develops students' translating skills, introduces methods for studying Latin literature in its historical and cultural contexts, and prepares students for advanced work in Latin language and literature. Graduate students who wish to receive course credit should register under this number.

  • Latin Language and Literature
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1022
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ZTST,

Katherine Walden

CSE 14101 | Elements of Computing I
Katherine Walden

Introduction to programming using the Python language. This course assumes no prior programming experience and emphasizes computational thinking, problem-solving, object-oriented programming, and programming literacy. Topics covered include basic syntax, data types, conditional execution, control flow structures, file I/O, and basic data manipulation. This includes basic programming constructs such as data, variables, functions, conditionals, loops, lists, files, sets, and dictionaries.

  • Computer Science and Engr.
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1283
  • 0 of 30 enrolled
  • TBA 05/31 - 07/23
  • OLF,ZODO,

Corey Pennycuff

CSE 14102 | Elements of Computing II
Corey Pennycuff

Intermediate level programming in Python, building on concepts covered in Elements of Computing I. Object-oriented programming and Python development environments. Topics covered include data structures; relational database systems; and data manipulation, analysis, and communication in a Python programming environment.

  • Computer Science and Engr.
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1538
  • 0 of 30 enrolled
  • MWR 05:00 PM-06:30 PM 05/31 - 07/23
  • OLF,ZODO,

Ramzi Bualuan

CSE 20232 | C/C++ Programming
Ramzi Bualuan

This course introduces students to computational thinking, and develops their ability to solve engineering problems in software. Students will learn structured programming, algorithm analysis and development, C syntax and semantics, logical and syntactical debugging, and software engineering fundamentals. Students will engage in practical, hands-on programming exercises both inside and outside of class.

  • Computer Science and Engr.
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1163
  • 0 of 20 enrolled
  • CETE,MET,

Matthew Morrison

CSE 24312 | Data Structures
Matthew Morrison

This is the second part of a two-course introduction-to-computing sequence intended for Computer Science and Computer Engineering majors. This course deepens and broadens student exposure to imperative and object-oriented programming and data structures. Topics covered include modularity, specification, data abstraction, classes and objects, genericity, inheritance. This course will focus these topics on design and use of elementary data structures such as lists, stacks, queues, and trees, as well as advanced techniques such as divide-and-conquer, sorting, searching and graph algorithms. More advanced data structures such as priority queues and search trees will also be covered.

  • Computer Science and Engr.
  • 4.0 credits    CRN 1311
  • 0 of 30 enrolled
  • MWR 05:00 PM-06:30 PM 05/31 - 07/23
  • OLF,ZODO,

Shreya Kumar

CSE 34332 | Progr. Paradigms
Shreya Kumar

Programming language overview: imperative and functional languages; logic programming. Scripting languages and tools. Development environments. Multi-language interfacing. Case studies. Comprehensive programming practice using several languages. Must have taken Data Structures as a pre-req.

  • Computer Science and Engr.
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1285
  • 0 of 30 enrolled
  • MR 05:30 PM-07:30 PM 05/31 - 07/23
  • OLF,ZODO,

Peter Bui

CSE 34872 | Programming Challenges
Peter Bui

This course encourages the development of practical programming and problem solving skills through hands-on practice and guided learning. This class revolves around solving "brain-teaser" and puzzle-type problems that regularly appear in programming contests, online challenges, and job interviews. Topics covered in this course include: performing I/O, processing strings, utilizing data structures, searching and sorting, using recursion, manipulating graphs, and applying advanced algorithmic techniques such as dynamic programming.

  • Computer Science and Engr.
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1286
  • 0 of 35 enrolled
  • MW 07:30 PM-09:00 PM 05/31 - 07/23
  • OLF,ZODO,

CSE 44648 | Data Science

Data science can be viewed as the art and craft of extracting knowledge from large bodies of structured and unstructured data using methods from many disciplines, including (but not limited to) machine learning, databases, probability and statistics, information theory, and data visualization. This course will focus on the process of data science -- from data acquisition to analytics methods to deployment, and will walk the students through both the technical and use-case aspects in the process. It will place a larger emphasis on the machine learning component, with relevant inclusions and references from other disciplines. The course will give students an opportunity to implement and experiment with some of the concepts as part of a class project, in addition to the hands-on assignments using the Python programming language. Additionally, the course touches upon some of the advances in related topics such as big data and discuss the role of data mining in contemporary society. The course has been designed and developed by Nitesh Chawla, the Frank Freimann Professor of Computer Science and Engineering and Director of iCeNSA at the University of Notre Dame. <p> Note: this course is delivered fully online. The course design combines required live weekly meetings online with self-scheduled lectures, problems, assignments, and interactive learning materials. To participate, students will need to have a computer with webcam, reliable internet connection, and a quiet place to participate in live sessions. <p>Students enrolling in this course should have taken <b> <u> one or more</b> </u> courses or implemented <b> <u>one or more</b> </u> projects involving Python programming and <b> <u>one or more courses</b> </u> in probability or statistics.

  • Computer Science and Engr.
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1289
  • 0 of 15 enrolled
  • TBA 05/31 - 07/23
  • OLF,ZODO,

Michael Wicks

CSE 44694 | Modern Web and App Dev
Michael Wicks

Today's student lives in an exciting time when one no longer requires a large team of engineers to launch a website or app. A single person with a great idea and grit can bring a product to market, raise awareness around an issue, begin selling online, and communicate visually at scale. This course will focus on topics of modern website and application development. We will begin by exploring static web site design and development utilizing contemporary design trends and modern technologies. We will then focus on creating dynamic web applications. During this course, students will take an idea for a web app and develop it into a working prototype. Students will then progressively add features to their applications while focusing on various engineering challenges that occur in production. They will become proficient in HTML, CSS, and JavaScript. These techniques are used by companies such as Airbnb, Netflix, Medium and PayPal which have all adopted a full stack JavaScript approach, and are very useful to those interested in smaller tech startups as well as tech giants such as Facebook and Google.

  • Computer Science and Engr.
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1287
  • 0 of 25 enrolled
  • TR 05:00 PM-06:30 PM 05/31 - 07/23
  • OLF,ZODO,

Gregory Madey

CSE 44967 | Comp Model & Simul - COVID-19
Gregory Madey

The course will cover computer-modeling techniques for simulating the behavior of disease transmission and the evaluation of public health interventions. The primary approach will be the individual-based modeling method (sometimes called the agent-based approach). Special focus will be given to modeling COVID-19 caused by the novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV- 2). Topics include methods for modeling and simulation, statistical distributions, random variate generation, animation, visualization, design of simulation experiments, verification and validation of simulations, and analysis of results. Students will be expected 1) to learn about computer simulation and modeling, 2) to learn about SARS-CoV-2, COVID-19 so as to define biological and public health problems for modeling and simulation, 3) to develop computer models designed to investigate relevant questions about COVID-19, and 4) to provide written documentation of the verification, validation and interpretation of their results. <p><b>Non-CSE majors interested in taking this course should email Prof. Greg Madey directly at gmadey@nd.edu

  • Computer Science and Engr.
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1288
  • 0 of 20 enrolled
  • MW 07:00 PM-08:30 PM 05/31 - 07/23
  • OLF,ZODO,

Ramzi Bualuan

CSE 60732 | C/C++ Programming
Ramzi Bualuan

Top-down analysis and structured programming. Basic analysis of algorithms, algorithm development, implementation and debugging and testing of programs will also be emphasized. Students will write several programs in the C++ language to learn the concepts taught and to acquire experience in solving problems using the UNIX operating system.

  • Computer Science and Engr.
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1164
  • 0 of 20 enrolled
  • ,

CSE 64648 | Data Science

Data science can be viewed as the art and craft of extracting knowledge from large bodies of structured and unstructured data using methods from many disciplines, including (but not limited to) machine learning, databases, probability and statistics, information theory, and data visualization. This course will focus on the process of data science -- from data acquisition to analytics methods to deployment, and will walk the students through both the technical and use-case aspects in the process. It will place a larger emphasis on the machine learning component, with relevant inclusions and references from other disciplines. The course will give students an opportunity to implement and experiment with some of the concepts as part of a class project, in addition to the hands-on assignments using the Python programming language. Additionally, the course touches upon some of the advances in related topics such as big data and discuss the role of data mining in contemporary society. The course has been designed and developed by Nitesh Chawla, the Frank Freimann Professor of Computer Science and Engineering and Director of iCeNSA at the University of Notre Dame. <p> Note: this course is delivered fully online. The course design combines required live weekly meetings online with self-scheduled lectures, problems, assignments, and interactive learning materials. To participate, students will need to have a computer with webcam, reliable internet connection, and a quiet place to participate in live sessions. <p>Students enrolling in this course should have taken <b> <u> one or more</b> </u> courses or implemented <b> <u>one or more</b> </u> projects involving Python programming and <b> <u>one or more courses</b> </u> in probability or statistics.

  • Computer Science and Engr.
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1290
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • TBA 05/31 - 07/23
  • OLF,ZODO,

Katherine Bennett

CSLC 73006 | EAP Graduate Writing
Katherine Bennett

The Center for the Study of Languages and Cultures (CSLC) offers this academic and technical writing course in the English for Academic Purposes summer program. The course is specifically designed for current international graduate students and incorporates multiple writing assignments based on a diverse collection of topics that will develop students' vocabulary and grammar alongside writing style with opportunities for individualized feedback. Students will be encouraged to tailor their writing submissions to their own academic field.

  • Ctr for Study of Lang&Cultures
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1384
  • 0 of 15 enrolled
  • ,

Lisa Oglesbee

CSLC 73007 | EAP Oral Proficiency
Lisa Oglesbee

The Center for the Study of Languages and Cultures (CSLC) offers this oral proficiency course in the English for Academic Purposes summer program. The course is designed to provide students with strategies for improving their English pronunciation, as well as instruction in and opportunities for giving academic presentations. In addition, teaching skills relevant to teaching/lab assistant roles will be covered and practiced.

  • Ctr for Study of Lang&Cultures
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1385
  • 0 of 15 enrolled
  • ,

Lisa Oglesbee

CSLC 73008 | Legal English
Lisa Oglesbee

The course is specifically designed for incoming and current international graduate students in the Law School.

  • Ctr for Study of Lang&Cultures
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1386
  • 0 of 15 enrolled
  • ,

Yuliya Fedorovych

ART 24102 | VCD 1: Fundamentals of Design
Yuliya Fedorovych

Fundamentals of Design is a gateway course for Visual Communication Design that introduces students to basic design elements and concepts like form and space, color, composition, typography, and grids. This course helps develop an understanding of the delicate balance between these design elements and how they can be effectively used in an effort to communicate an idea, thought, or concept. This course builds a vigorous foundation that allows students to acquire visual skill sets that serve as a firm foundation for advanced level courses in Visual Communication Design. *The course has a corequisite lab where students learn Adobe Illustrator, Photoshop, and InDesign. The lab is integrated into this course*

  • Design
  • 4.0 credits    CRN 1562
  • 0 of 15 enrolled
  • MR 01:00 PM-03:00 PM 05/31 - 07/23
  • OLF,ZODO,

Carolyn Hardin

ACMS 64301 | Communication and Storytelling
Carolyn Hardin

This course is designed to develop communication skills for data scientists working in industry and business contexts. Students master the art of clear, effective, and engaging scientific and technical communications, with attention to the business necessity of translating complex technical subjects into actionable insights. Students identify and analyze rhetorical situations in technical discourse communities, assist them in defining their purpose in writing/presenting information, and teach them to design materials and deliver presentations that are properly targeted and appropriately styled.

  • Data Science
  • 1.5 credits    CRN 1533
  • 0 of 40 enrolled
  • M 07:00 PM-10:45 PM 05/24 - 06/27
  • OLF,ZODO,

Scott Nestler

ACMS 64305 | Ethics/Policy in Data Science
Scott Nestler

Data-informed decision making has created new opportunities, but also expands the set of possible risks to organizations. One of these risks comes from grappling with the "should we?" question with regard to data and analytics, and associated privacy concerns. In this course students are introduced to some of the frameworks to address the issues related to the proper roles of public law, government regulation, and ethics in performing and managing analytics activities. Upon completion, the students should be comfortable adapting one of these ethical frameworks for use in alignment with their organizational missions.

  • Data Science
  • 1.5 credits    CRN 1534
  • 0 of 40 enrolled
  • M 07:00 PM-10:45 PM 06/28 - 08/01
  • OLF,ZODO,

Christopher Frederick

ACMS 64620 | Databases and Data Security
Christopher Frederick

Calibrated to data science applications, this course focuses on effective techniques in managing, ingesting, retrieving and updating information from a database system. It provides an introduction to relational databases, including topics such as relational calculus and algebra, integrity constraints, distributed databases, and data security. Students are introduced to database technologies utilized in industry, such as NoSQL, graph databases, in-memory databases, querying data over HDFS (Hive), etc. The final project for this course consists of the integration of a database system into an analytics workflow.

  • Data Science
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1539
  • 0 of 40 enrolled
  • R 07:00 PM-10:45 PM 05/24 - 08/01
  • OLF,ZODO,

Forrest Spence

ECON 10010 | Principles of Microeconomics
Forrest Spence

An introduction to economics, with particular attention to the pricing mechanism, competitive and monopolistic markets, government regulation of the economy, labor-management relations and programs, income determination and public policy, trade and the international economy.

  • Economics
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1401
  • 0 of 25 enrolled
  • BA01,ZFYS, SOSC,WKSS

Eva Dziadula

ECON 14022 | Principles of Macroeconomics
Eva Dziadula

A continuation of introduction to economics with emphasis on the measurement of national economic performance, alternative explanations of short-run economic fluctuations and long-run economic growth, money and credit, fiscal and monetary policy.

  • Economics
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1514
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • MTR 07:00 PM-08:50 PM 05/31 - 07/15
  • OLF,ZODO,

Forrest Spence

ECON 20010 | Principles of Microeconomics
Forrest Spence

An introduction to economics, with particular attention to the pricing mechanism, competitive and monopolistic markets, government regulation of the economy, labor-management relations and programs, income determination and public policy, trade and the international economy.

  • Economics
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1402
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • BA01, SOSC,WKSS

Eva Dziadula

ECON 24022 | Principles of Macroeconomics
Eva Dziadula

A continuation of introduction to economics with emphasis on the measurement of national economic performance, alternative explanations of short-run economic fluctuations and long-run economic growth, money and credit, fiscal and monetary policy.

  • Economics
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1513
  • 0 of 20 enrolled
  • MTR 07:00 PM-08:50 PM 05/31 - 07/15
  • OLF,ZODO,

ECON 34795 | Economics of a Green Germany

The course provides a comprehensive view of the Energiewende - Germany's effort to reshape its energy system, the industry, and building sectors into a nuclear-free, low-carbon economy. The course applies a range of analytical methods - including economic assessment tools, legal analyses and political science - to shed light on different facets of the Energiewende, and to help understand the public and academic debates around it. The course thus offers different angles - looking at the economics of the Energiewende, as well as the technological, social, ethical, legal and political implications. The course faculty includes senior staff of the Ecologic Institute with backgrounds in economics, law, political science, engineering and history, complemented by discussions with stakeholders and policy makers.

  • Economics
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1396
  • 0 of 3 enrolled
  • ZOBG,

Gail Mayotte

ACE 60022 | Intro to Teaching - Elementary
Gail Mayotte

This course provides an introduction to the meaning and practice of contemporary teaching. It includes historical highlights in public and Catholic education, and considers cultural and social contexts of today?s Catholic schools. Professional, legal, and ethical responsibilities of the teacher are emphasized along with classroom organization and management.

  • Education
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1312
  • 0 of 20 enrolled
  • ,

Diane Maletta, Gail Mayotte

ACE 60022 | Intro to Teaching - Elementary
Diane Maletta, Gail Mayotte

This course provides an introduction to the meaning and practice of contemporary teaching. It includes historical highlights in public and Catholic education, and considers cultural and social contexts of today?s Catholic schools. Professional, legal, and ethical responsibilities of the teacher are emphasized along with classroom organization and management.

  • Education
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1313
  • 0 of 20 enrolled
  • ,

Alec Torigian, Gail Mayotte

ACE 60024 | Intro to Teaching - Middle Sch
Alec Torigian, Gail Mayotte

This course provides an introduction to the meaning and practice of contemporary teaching. It includes historical highlights in public and Catholic education, and considers cultural and social contexts of today?s Catholic schools. Professional, legal, and ethical responsibilities of the teacher are emphasized along with classroom organization and management.

  • Education
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1314
  • 0 of 35 enrolled
  • ,

Michael Macaluso, Gail Mayotte

ACE 60026 | Intro to Teaching -High School
Michael Macaluso, Gail Mayotte

This course provides an introduction to the meaning and practice of contemporary teaching. It includes historical highlights in public and Catholic education, and considers cultural and social contexts of today?s Catholic schools. Professional, legal, and ethical responsibilities of the teacher are emphasized along with classroom organization and management.

  • Education
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1315
  • 0 of 35 enrolled
  • ,

Louis DelFra, Gail Mayotte

ACE 60060 | Teaching in Cath Schools
Louis DelFra, Gail Mayotte

An overview of six core topics of Catholic teaching along with a discussion of their influence and impact on Catholic school culture and teaching

  • Education
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1316
  • 0 of 65 enrolled
  • ,

William Mattison, Gail Mayotte

ACE 60070 | Teaching Rel in Cath Schools
William Mattison, Gail Mayotte

An overview of six core topics of Catholic teaching along with initial planning with grade level master teachers to teach these topics in Catholic schools.

  • Education
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1317
  • 0 of 50 enrolled
  • ,

Monica Kowalski, Gail Mayotte

ACE 60102 | Effctve Elem Clsrm Tchng
Monica Kowalski, Gail Mayotte

The development of knowledge, skills, and dispositions essential for elementary teachers: lesson and unit planning, yearly planning, cross-curricular planning, and effective teaching strategies in the K-6 classroom. Topics will also include grouping for instruction and differentiated instruction, motivation, effective use of learning centers, use of texts, student learning standards, and multiple resources.

  • Education
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 1318
  • 0 of 35 enrolled
  • ,

Patrick Kirkland, Gail Mayotte

ACE 60112 | Mathematics in Elem Ed II
Patrick Kirkland, Gail Mayotte

In this course, participants will draw on their experiences as educators to improve their capacity to apply content-specific pedagogies in the elementary setting (K-6). By examining evidenced-based practices and discussing key features of state and NCTM standards, participants will be expected to refine and enhance how they design instruction and assessments that implement core mathematics teaching practices.

  • Education
  • 0.5 credits    CRN 1560
  • 0 of 30 enrolled
  • ,

Patrick Kirkland, Gail Mayotte

ACE 60132 | Mathematics in Elem Educ
Patrick Kirkland, Gail Mayotte

The development of the mathematical and pedagogical content knowledge for teaching mathematics in the elementary classroom (K-6). The course gives attention to learning theory, evidenced-based instructional methods, frameworks, and assessment practices, and standards of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics

  • Education
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 1319
  • 0 of 35 enrolled
  • ,

Jodene Morrell, Gail Mayotte

ACE 60142 | Reading and Lang Arts in Elem
Jodene Morrell, Gail Mayotte

An integrated approach to literacy instruction designed to help children make sense of the world through literacy expression of all language arts elements including grammar, spelling, writing, and speaking and listening skills as well as continuing their understanding of essential reading components using quality children's literature and multi-sensory approaches. Course content will include a focus on assessment with readings on current research, practice in constructing traditional and performance assessments in relation to stated unit goals, and analyses of results to inform future planning and instruction.

  • Education
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1320
  • 0 of 31 enrolled
  • ,

Martha Beesley, Gail Mayotte

ACE 60162 | Content Methods for Elem Educ
Martha Beesley, Gail Mayotte

A review of content-specific methods framed by readings on theory and evidence-based practices and frameworks will enable participants to develop cohesive units of study which integrate reading, writing, mathematics, social studies and science.

  • Education
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 1321
  • 0 of 31 enrolled
  • ,

Erin Wibbens, Gail Mayotte

ACE 60182 | Teaching of Reading
Erin Wibbens, Gail Mayotte

An exploration of the research and instructional strategies of reading instruction including emergent literacy, reading readiness, phonemic awareness, phonics, word recognition, vocabulary development, fluency, cultural literacy, and reading comprehension, as well as direct, explicit, and multi-sensory strategies for reading remediation.

  • Education
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1322
  • 0 of 35 enrolled
  • ,

Jessica Fries-Gaither, Gail Mayotte

ACE 60192 | Sci and SS Teaching in Elem
Jessica Fries-Gaither, Gail Mayotte

An introduction to methods for teaching elementary science and social studies with a focus on selecting standards-based content, developing inquiry-based lessons, and finding and using appropriate resources.

  • Education
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1323
  • 0 of 35 enrolled
  • ,

Gail Mayotte

ACE 60204 | Intro to Middle School Teachng
Gail Mayotte

An introduction to the culture and dynamics of the middle school classroom. Central to the course is instructional planning that emphasizes unit planning based on goals derived from state standards and assessments which measure student progress in meeting these goals. Lesson planning based on unit goals focuses on an integrative survey of strategies and methods that lead to effective daily instruction.

  • Education
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1324
  • 0 of 35 enrolled
  • ,

Mark Johnson, Gail Mayotte

ACE 60256 | Intro to High School Teaching
Mark Johnson, Gail Mayotte

An introduction to the culture and dynamics of the high school classroom. Central to the course is instructional planning that emphasizes unit planning based on goals derived from state standards and assessments that measure student progress in meeting these goals. Lesson planning based on unit goals focuses on an integrative survey of strategies and methods that lead to effective daily instruction.

  • Education
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1325
  • 0 of 35 enrolled
  • ,

Christine Bonfiglio, Gail Mayotte

ACE 60312 | Inclusive Teach Practices Elem
Christine Bonfiglio, Gail Mayotte

A survey in inclusive education with emphasis on the elementary-aged student is followed by an in-depth study of the common learning issues in the elementary grades. Academics, behavior, and executive functioning are addressed with a focus on strategies and assessment.

  • Education
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1326
  • 0 of 31 enrolled
  • ,

Emily Kubaszak, Christine Bonfiglio, Gail Mayotte

ACE 60324 | Inclusive Teach Practices MS
Emily Kubaszak, Christine Bonfiglio, Gail Mayotte

A survey in inclusive education with emphasis on the early adolescent student is followed by an in-depth study of the common learning issues in the middle grades. Academics, behavior, and executive functioning are addressed with a focus on strategies and assessment.

  • Education
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1327
  • 0 of 32 enrolled
  • ,

Abby Giroux, Christine Bonfiglio, Gail Mayotte

ACE 60336 | Inclusive Teach Practices HS
Abby Giroux, Christine Bonfiglio, Gail Mayotte

A survey in inclusive education with emphasis on the adolescent student is followed by an in-depth study of the common learning issues in the high school grades. Academics, behavior, and executive functioning are addressed with a focus on strategies and assessment.

  • Education
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1328
  • 0 of 28 enrolled
  • ,

Andrea Christensen, Gail Mayotte

ACE 60455 | Devel/Moral Educ in Child/Adol
Andrea Christensen, Gail Mayotte

A systematic treatment of cognitive, social, biological, and personality development during childhood through late adolescence relating to education and an examination of the theoretical and research bases of moral development and their implications for P-12 classrooms.

  • Education
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1464
  • 0 of 25 enrolled
  • ,

Luis Mendez Perez, Gail Mayotte

ACE 60455 | Devel/Moral Educ in Child/Adol
Luis Mendez Perez, Gail Mayotte

A systematic treatment of cognitive, social, biological, and personality development during childhood through late adolescence relating to education and an examination of the theoretical and research bases of moral development and their implications for P-12 classrooms.

  • Education
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1465
  • 0 of 25 enrolled
  • ,

Daniel Lapsley, Gail Mayotte

ACE 60455 | Devel/Moral Educ in Child/Adol
Daniel Lapsley, Gail Mayotte

A systematic treatment of cognitive, social, biological, and personality development during childhood through late adolescence relating to education and an examination of the theoretical and research bases of moral development and their implications for P-12 classrooms.

  • Education
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1466
  • 0 of 25 enrolled
  • ,

Nicole McNeil, Gail Mayotte

ACE 60455 | Devel/Moral Educ in Child/Adol
Nicole McNeil, Gail Mayotte

A systematic treatment of cognitive, social, biological, and personality development during childhood through late adolescence relating to education and an examination of the theoretical and research bases of moral development and their implications for P-12 classrooms.

  • Education
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1467
  • 0 of 25 enrolled
  • ,

Kati Macaluso, Gail Mayotte, Michael Macaluso

ACE 60605 | English/Lang Arts Educ I
Kati Macaluso, Gail Mayotte, Michael Macaluso

In this course, participants will extend their developing knowledge of curriculum and instructional planning to reflect the unique content and skill of English/Language Arts pedagogy. By exploring current research from peer reviewed literature, examining evidenced-based practices, discussing key features of state and NCTE standards, and simulating relevant instructional scenarios, participants will begin to plan and deliver high-impact learning experiences for their middle and high school students.

  • Education
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 1474
  • 0 of 20 enrolled
  • ,

Meghan McDermott, Brian Collier, Gail Mayotte

ACE 60625 | Social Studies Educ I
Meghan McDermott, Brian Collier, Gail Mayotte

In this course, participants will extend their developing knowledge of curriculum and instructional planning to reflect the unique content, skill and literacy-related priorities of Social Studies pedagogy. By exploring current research from peer reviewed literature, examining evidenced-based practices, discussing key features of state and NCSS standards, and simulating relevant instructional scenarios, participants will begin to plan and deliver high-impact learning experiences for their middle and high school students.

  • Education
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 1475
  • 0 of 15 enrolled
  • ,

Christine Trinter, Gail Mayotte

ACE 60665 | Mathematics Educ I
Christine Trinter, Gail Mayotte

In this course, participants will extend their developing knowledge of curriculum and instructional planning to reflect the unique content and skill of Mathematics pedagogy. By exploring current research from peer reviewed literature, examining evidenced-based practices, discussing key features of state and NCTM standards, and simulating relevant instructional scenarios, participants will begin to plan and deliver high-impact learning experiences for their middle and high school students.

  • Education
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 1476
  • 0 of 20 enrolled
  • ,

Matthew Kloser, Gail Mayotte

ACE 60685 | Science Educ I
Matthew Kloser, Gail Mayotte

In this course, participants will extend their developing knowledge of curriculum and instructional planning to reflect the unique content, skill and literacy-related priorities of Science pedagogy. By exploring current research from peer reviewed literature, examining evidenced-based practices, discussing key features of state and NSTA standards, and simulating relevant instructional scenarios, participants will begin to plan and deliver high-impact learning experiences for their middle and high school students.

  • Education
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 1477
  • 0 of 20 enrolled
  • ,

Edward Caron, Gail Mayotte

ACE 60695 | Literacy in the Content Areas
Edward Caron, Gail Mayotte

This course will focus on reading and writing in the content areas and introduce literacy strategies, resources, and assessments for use in middle and high school classrooms. Specific attention will be given to teaching and learning of texts with scientifically-based reading components of comprehension, vocabulary development, use of language to support learning, and informal and formal writing. Inclusion of interventions that are direct, explicit, and multi-sensory are provided.

  • Education
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1478
  • 0 of 60 enrolled
  • ,

Kati Macaluso, Gail Mayotte, Michael Macaluso

ACE 60705 | English/Lang Arts Educ II
Kati Macaluso, Gail Mayotte, Michael Macaluso

In this course, participants will draw on their experiences as educators to improve their capacity to apply content-specific pedagogies in a middle and high school setting. By analyzing peer-reviewed literature, examining evidenced-based practices, discussing key features of state and NCTE standards, and simulating relevant instructional scenarios, participants will be expected to refine and enhance how they design learning experiences and assessments that implement key aspects of English/Language Arts pedagogy.

  • Education
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1479
  • 0 of 15 enrolled
  • ,

Meghan McDermott, Brian Collier, Gail Mayotte

ACE 60725 | Social Studies Educ II
Meghan McDermott, Brian Collier, Gail Mayotte

In this course, participants will draw on their experiences as educators to improve their capacity to apply content-specific pedagogies in a middle and high school setting. By analyzing peer-reviewed literature, examining evidenced-based practices, discussing key features of state and NCSS standards, and simulating relevant instructional scenarios, participants will be expected to refine and enhance how they design learning experiences and assessments that implement key aspects of Social Studies pedagogy.

  • Education
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1480
  • 0 of 16 enrolled
  • ,

Christine Trinter, Gail Mayotte

ACE 60765 | Mathematics Educ II
Christine Trinter, Gail Mayotte

In this course, participants will draw on their experiences as educators to improve their capacity to apply content-specific pedagogies in a middle and high school setting. By analyzing peer-reviewed literature, examining evidenced-based practices, discussing key features of state and NCTM standards, and simulating relevant instructional scenarios, participants will be expected to refine and enhance how they design learning experiences and assessments that implement key aspects of Mathematics pedagogy.

  • Education
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1481
  • 0 of 17 enrolled
  • ,

Matthew Kloser, Gail Mayotte

ACE 60785 | Science Educ II
Matthew Kloser, Gail Mayotte

In this course, participants will draw on their experiences as educators to improve their capacity to apply content-specific pedagogies in a middle and high school setting. By analyzing peer-reviewed literature, examining evidenced-based practices, discussing key features of state and NSTA standards, and simulating relevant instructional scenarios, participants will be expected to refine and enhance how they design learning experiences and assessments that implement key aspects of Science pedagogy.

  • Education
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1482
  • 0 of 15 enrolled
  • ,

Nathan Wills, Gail Mayotte

ACE 60865 | Blended Learning
Nathan Wills, Gail Mayotte

This course introduces models of Blended Learning, strengths and weaknesses of Blended Learning models, and content delivery options.

  • Education
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1483
  • 0 of 30 enrolled
  • ,

Kathryn Lichon, Gail Mayotte

ACE 60875 | Supporting ELL
Kathryn Lichon, Gail Mayotte

Introduction to the process of language acquisition. Additional focus upon practical pedagogical strategies for supporting English Language Learners(ELLs) at all age levels.

  • Education
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1473
  • 0 of 90 enrolled
  • ,

John Schoenig, Gail Mayotte

ACE 63500 | Integrative Seminar
John Schoenig, Gail Mayotte

An integration of the professional, communal, and spiritual dimensions of the ACE program. Participants engage in active listening as well as interactive and collaborative learning exercises to integrate these pillars of ACE in their professional service to Catholic schools.

  • Education
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1468
  • 0 of 190 enrolled
  • ,

Eugene Buczynski, Gail Mayotte

ACE 65032 | Practicum - Elementary
Eugene Buczynski, Gail Mayotte

An intense practicum in the local area schools during the summer. The clinical experience will include closely supervised teaching as well as reflections on that experience. Extensive planning of instruction is required.

  • Education
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 1469
  • 0 of 30 enrolled
  • MTWRF 08:00 AM-12:00 PM 06/14 - 06/30
  • ,

Eugene Buczynski, Gail Mayotte

ACE 65034 | Practicum - Middle School
Eugene Buczynski, Gail Mayotte

An intense practicum in the local area schools during the summer. The clinical experience will include closely supervised teaching as well as reflections on that experience. Extensive planning of instruction is required.

  • Education
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 1470
  • 0 of 35 enrolled
  • ,

Eugene Buczynski, Gail Mayotte

ACE 65036 | Practicum - High School
Eugene Buczynski, Gail Mayotte

An intense practicum in the local area schools during the summer. The clinical experience will include closely supervised teaching as well as reflections on that experience. Extensive planning of instruction is required.

  • Education
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 1471
  • 0 of 35 enrolled
  • ,

Christine Bonfiglio, Gail Mayotte

ACE 67980 | Special Topics in Education
Christine Bonfiglio, Gail Mayotte

This course provides an opportunity for students to explore issues and experiences in education with the approval of the Academic Director.

  • Education
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1472
  • 0 of 15 enrolled
  • TBA 05/31 - 07/21
  • ,

Allison Longton

ACE 70100 | Linguistic & Lang. Acquisition
Allison Longton

This course addresses linguistics, components of language, and the principles of first- and second- language acquisition. Content includes theory and evidence-based research of language acquisition and development, the purposes that language serves, and the key roles of oral, written, and nonverbal communication in literacy development in the context of elementary, middle, and secondary levels.

  • Education
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1523
  • 0 of 37 enrolled
  • MTWRF 01:00 PM-04:30 PM 07/19 - 07/30
  • OLF,ZODO,

Laura Hamman

ACE 70110 | Teaching 2nd Language Learners
Laura Hamman

This course addresses the foundational principles of English learner instruction and language acquisition as applied to EL instruction and assessment. Content includes the integration of social, cultural, psychological, and pedagogical influences; historical and legal background of second language instruction; literacy, writing, and oral language development; and multicultural literature in the context of elementary, middle, and secondary levels.

  • Education
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1522
  • 0 of 37 enrolled
  • MWF 01:00 PM-03:00 PM 07/05 - 07/16
  • OLF,ZODO,

Christine Bonfiglio

ACE 70200 | Foundation in Inclusive Ed
Christine Bonfiglio

An introduction to inclusive education with a focus on understanding learner attributes including academic, behavioral, social/emotional and health issues is provided. Historical, philosophical, and ethical perspectives serve as a foundation for understanding learning strengths and challenges. Evidence-based frameworks and practices that seek to address complex learning needs promoting inclusive practice are emphasized. Clinical experiences in a Catholic school are required.

  • Education
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1391
  • 0 of 35 enrolled
  • MTWRF 03:00 PM-04:00 PM 05/24 - 07/23
  • OLF,ZODO,

Christine Bonfiglio, Michael Faggella-Luby, Sean Smith

ACE 70201 | Critical Elements Inclusion
Christine Bonfiglio, Michael Faggella-Luby, Sean Smith

Critical elements of planning and instruction within a multi-tiered system of support are addressed. Assessment and data-based decision making are examined to address the learning needs of students who struggle in the classroom environment. Attention is given to accommodations and curricular modifications, as well as frameworks and strategies that impact behavior. Clinical experiences in a Catholic school are required.

  • Education
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 1392
  • 0 of 35 enrolled
  • MTWRF 03:00 PM-04:00 PM 05/24 - 07/23
  • ,

Christine Bonfiglio, Sean Smith

ACE 70202 | Collaboration, Community & Cul
Christine Bonfiglio, Sean Smith

Critical elements of professional collaboration and consultation within a multi-tiered system of support are addressed. Communication, roles/responsibilities, and culture of key stakeholders are a central focus. Teaming and problem-solving models are examined to address the needs of students who struggle in the classroom environment. Clinical experiences in a Catholic school are required.

  • Education
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 1393
  • 0 of 35 enrolled
  • MTWRF 03:00 PM-04:00 PM 05/24 - 07/23
  • OLF,ZODO,

Christine Bonfiglio, Michael Faggella-Luby, Sean Smith

ACE 70204 | Policy & Practice Special Ed.
Christine Bonfiglio, Michael Faggella-Luby, Sean Smith

Effective practice and implications of special education policy for learners with diverse needs are provided. Specialized methods of service delivery are addressed for students with diagnoses. Attention is given to accommodations, curricular modifications, sensory integration, and transition planning. Evidence-based practices are advanced to enable successful individualized educational planning. Clinical experiences in a Catholic school are required.

  • Education
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1399
  • 0 of 35 enrolled
  • ,

Michael Zelenka, Kathleen Carr

ACE 70610 | School Organizational Culture
Michael Zelenka, Kathleen Carr

This course introduces candidates to the concepts and skills needed to build a school-wide culture of achievement aligned to a vision of success for every student. Candidates develop a theoretical framework for creating and sustaining a strong, positive, intentional school culture aligned with the mission, vision, beliefs, and values of school leaders. In particular, the course focuses on articulating a set of root beliefs and core values that inform a culture of achievement and establish a climate of high expectations for academics and character development. Candidates are introduced to a process that ensures that each policy, procedure and program is reflective of the culture of the school community's unique history, mission, and beliefs.

  • Education
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1511
  • 0 of 50 enrolled
  • ,

Betsy Okello, David Sorkin, Kathleen Carr

ACE 70611 | Org. Mgmt. & Board Gov.
Betsy Okello, David Sorkin, Kathleen Carr

This course introduces candidates to the executive management skills necessary to support school improvement and achieve educational excellence. Candidates are introduced to board governance and board management concepts and skills. Candidates learn strategies and best practices in how to seek new resources to support school programs and advance the institutional mission. This course has a particular focus on planning, managing, and monitoring mission-driven advancement goals.

  • Education
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1506
  • 0 of 50 enrolled
  • ,

Mary Jones, April Garcia, Jennifer Beltramo, Kathleen Carr

ACE 70612 | Curriculum & Standards Algnmnt
Mary Jones, April Garcia, Jennifer Beltramo, Kathleen Carr

This course introduces candidates to the leadership skills necessary to ensure high quality teaching and learning school-wide. Candidates learn a framework for fostering effective school-wide instruction, assessment, and curriculum as the instructional leader of a school. This course also prepares candidates to implement structures that support a culture for learning in schools including: rigorous standards-based curriculum, core instructional practices, classroom observation, teacher collaboration, and cycles of inquiry around student data and assessment. Candidates develop a comprehensive understanding of research-based curriculum and instructional practices, situated within a framework of a culture for learning that promotes the success of all students.

  • Education
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1503
  • 0 of 50 enrolled
  • ,

Michael Zelenka, Kathleen Carr, Ryan Clark

ACE 70620 | Leading Change & Communities
Michael Zelenka, Kathleen Carr, Ryan Clark

This course prepares candidates to implement a school-wide culture of achievement aligned to the school's vision of success for every student. Candidates will build on their organizational framework for creating and sustaining a strong, positive, intentional school culture aligned with the mission, vision, beliefs, and values of school leaders and focus on developing plans to communicate and work collaboratively with individuals and groups inside and outside the school to promote continuous improvement. Candidates learn how to establish an organizational culture of urgency in which students, parents/guardians, teachers, staff, and other key stakeholders relentlessly pursue academic and behavioral excellence, and they learn effective strategies to forge consensus for change, manage and monitor change, and secure cooperation from key stakeholders in planning and implementing change.

  • Education
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1508
  • 0 of 40 enrolled
  • ,

Sandria Morten, David Sorkin, Kathleen Carr

ACE 70621 | Inst. Adv. & Facilities Mgmt.
Sandria Morten, David Sorkin, Kathleen Carr

This course further prepares candidates to develop the executive management skills necessary to support school improvement and achieve educational excellence. Candidates learn to establish and lead an administrative team, to delegate and support staff, and to establish priorities and objectives daily, weekly, monthly, and annually. Candidates will learn the technological tools and systems to facilitate communication and collaboration while learning to address controversial issues as the public and political roles of school leaders. This course will also introduce best practices for the safe and efficient operation of the physical plant.

  • Education
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1507
  • 0 of 40 enrolled
  • ,

Mary Jones, April Garcia, Kathleen Carr

ACE 70622 | Data, Observation, & Feedback
Mary Jones, April Garcia, Kathleen Carr

This course prepares candidates to foster professional learning communities as an ongoing process of mission-driven and data-informed improvement within their schools. Candidates will deepen their knowledge of collaborative teacher learning and evidence-driven cycles of inquiry that will strengthen student achievement and ensure effective teaching and learning school-wide.

  • Education
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1505
  • 0 of 40 enrolled
  • ,

Nathan Wills, Judith Madden, Kathleen Carr, Sarah Perkins, William Mattison

ACE 73622 | Models of Leadership
Nathan Wills, Judith Madden, Kathleen Carr, Sarah Perkins, William Mattison

?This course seeks to form students as integrated spiritual leaders in their school and community. Candidates are prepared to be self-reflective and spiritually connected to our Catholic faith as they cultivate their interior life and grow as zealous disciples of Jesus Christ. In particular, they do this throughout this semester by developing a theological and pastoral understanding of the Remick Leadership Program Root Beliefs. Students are challenged to create strategies to adapt and apply these insights to their Catholic school and community context.

  • Education
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1509
  • 0 of 90 enrolled
  • ,

Louis DelFra, Kathleen Carr

ACE 73624 | Integrated Leadership
Louis DelFra, Kathleen Carr

This course prepares candidates to cultivate habits of lifelong, transformational leaders. It focuses on integrating reflective practice, spiritual growth, and community formation through the three primary domains of school leadership: instructional leadership, executive management, and school culture.

  • Education
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1510
  • 0 of 48 enrolled
  • MF 10:40 AM-12:00 PM 06/28 - 07/09
  • ,

Kole Knueppel, Gregory O'Donnell, Kathleen Carr

ACE 73640 | Transformational Leadership
Kole Knueppel, Gregory O'Donnell, Kathleen Carr

In this course candidates have an opportunity to learn from transformational leaders from a variety of sectors. Through storytelling and reflection on how they live out the Remick Leadership Program disposition, these leaders inspire candidates to transform Catholic schools and the Church.

  • Education
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1500
  • 0 of 48 enrolled
  • MTRF 01:40 PM-03:50 PM 06/28 - 07/10
  • ,

Betsy Okello, David Sorkin, Kathleen Carr, Kelly O'Leary, Sandria Morten

ACE 73643 | Inquiry & Intervention III
Betsy Okello, David Sorkin, Kathleen Carr, Kelly O'Leary, Sandria Morten

Over the course of the second year, candidates use methods from the fields of action research and improvement science to lead improvement in their school. During this course candidates integrate the knowledge and skills they have gained throughout the course and Remick program to present their findings, reflect on the process of leading change, and make recommendations for future action. Candidates present their findings at annual Remick Leadership Conference.

  • Education
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 1499
  • 0 of 48 enrolled
  • ,

Ramzi Bualuan

EG 00100 | Introduction to Engineering
Ramzi Bualuan

A noncredit course for high school students who have completed the junior year. A survey of the courses of study and career paths in aerospace, chemical, civil, computer, electrical, and mechanical engineering. An introduction to problem solving and computer programming through group projects. Trips to tour local and nearby industries, as examples of various engineering environments, are included. Offered in the first half of the summer session.

  • Engineering (Non-Departmental)
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1486
  • 0 of 20 enrolled
  • ,

Ramzi Bualuan

EG 00100 | Introduction to Engineering
Ramzi Bualuan

A noncredit course for high school students who have completed the junior year. A survey of the courses of study and career paths in aerospace, chemical, civil, computer, electrical, and mechanical engineering. An introduction to problem solving and computer programming through group projects. Trips to tour local and nearby industries, as examples of various engineering environments, are included. Offered in the first half of the summer session.

  • Engineering (Non-Departmental)
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1487
  • 0 of 20 enrolled
  • ,

Ramzi Bualuan

EG 00155 | IEP Counselors
Ramzi Bualuan

Introduction to Engineering summer program for High School Juniors.

  • Engineering (Non-Departmental)
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1490
  • 0 of 12 enrolled
  • ,

Ramzi Bualuan

EG 00200 | Introduction to Engineering
Ramzi Bualuan

The same course content as EG 00100. Offered in the second half of the summer session.

  • Engineering (Non-Departmental)
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1488
  • 0 of 20 enrolled
  • ,

Ramzi Bualuan

EG 00200 | Introduction to Engineering
Ramzi Bualuan

The same course content as EG 00100. Offered in the second half of the summer session.

  • Engineering (Non-Departmental)
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1489
  • 0 of 20 enrolled
  • ,

Holly Martin

ENGL 20235 | Introduction to Shakespeare
Holly Martin

This course introduces students to a wide variety of themes in Shakespeare's plays as well as to the plays' context and conventions. Particular emphasis will be placed on the plays' nature as scripts for the stage and, more recently, film. However the course will primarily focus on the difficulties of social interaction and self knowledge as seen in Shakespeare's use of plays-within-plays and of theatrical themes and language.

  • English
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1485
  • 0 of 19 enrolled
  • ZTST, LIT,WKLI

David Thomas

ENGL 20323 | The British Novel
David Thomas

This course surveys the British novel from its appearance in the early 1700s up to the 20th Century. Our texts are chosen to exhibit the historical, stylistic and thematic variety of this literary genre over that period. Topics involve history of economics, politics, gender/sexuality as reflected in novelistic narratives, and literary concepts such as realism and the gothic. Possible main texts spanning over two centuries include Daniel Defoe's Moll Flanders, Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, Charles Dickens's Great Expectations, and Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway, Further smaller readings will be available as electronic downloads. Coursework involves a mixture of short papers, reading journals, and quizzes.

  • English
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1484
  • 0 of 19 enrolled
  • MESE,ZTST, LIT,WKLI

Bryan Santin

ENGL 24156 | Free Speech
Bryan Santin

This introductory course surveys the core texts, doctrines, ideas, and cultural controversies related to First Amendment protections for free expression. We will be especially interested in some large questions: what is expression? How have our ideas of freedom of expression evolved as we enter the digital age? What kind of expression should be permissible? What happens when the public forum is fully online? What is the relationship between free expression and democratic-self government? Is there a difference between individual, group, and government speech? How do we navigate alternative ways of thinking about free expression in a global media ecosystem? We will consider a selection of exemplary cases, controversies, and literary texts: among our topics will include the following: the transformation of speech in the age of digital media; libel, satire and parody; piracy, intellectual property and copyright; privacy and surveillance; hate speech and incitement; obscenity and pornography. We will investigate the topic by studying relevant case law, literary texts (including fiction, film and new media), political philosophy, and information policy? Disclaimer: you will encounter speech that is potentially offensive and discomforting in this course. <p> Note: this course is delivered fully online. The course design combines required live weekly meetings online with self-scheduled lectures, problems, assignments, and interactive learning materials. To participate, students will need to have a computer with webcam, reliable internet connection, and a quiet place to participate in live sessions.

  • English
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1292
  • 0 of 25 enrolled
  • MW 08:00 PM-09:30 PM 05/31 - 07/23
  • OLF,ZODO, LIT,WKLI

Maureen Collins

ENGL 67890 | Independent Summer Research
Maureen Collins

This course is for graduate students receiving a summer stipend and conducting independent research. Registering for this course will ensure proper classification for tax purposes. Only those students both actively engaged in research and receiving a stipend are eligible for this course.

  • English
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1034
  • 0 of 75 enrolled
  • ,

Sara Maurer

ENGL 98601 | Research and Dissertation
Sara Maurer

Independent research and writing on an approved subject under the direction of a faculty member.

  • English
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1035
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Elliott Visconsi

ENGL 98601 | Research and Dissertation
Elliott Visconsi

Independent research and writing on an approved subject under the direction of a faculty member.

  • English
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1036
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Laura Walls

ENGL 98601 | Research and Dissertation
Laura Walls

Independent research and writing on an approved subject under the direction of a faculty member.

  • English
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1037
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Kate Marshall

ENGL 98601 | Research and Dissertation
Kate Marshall

Independent research and writing on an approved subject under the direction of a faculty member.

  • English
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1038
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Jesse Lander

ENGL 98601 | Research and Dissertation
Jesse Lander

Independent research and writing on an approved subject under the direction of a faculty member.

  • English
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1039
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

SC 60212 | Professionalism

The Professionalism Course focuses upon a collection of skills and dispositions aimed at helping students transition into the role of a professional. Topics include: Project Management, Time Management, Communication Practices, and Professional Development.

  • EG, SC & Tech Entrepreneurship
  • 0.5 credits    CRN 1589
  • 0 of 55 enrolled
  • MW 03:00 PM-04:15 PM 07/12 - 07/21
  • ,

SC 61201 | Design Entrepreneurship

This process-based course introduces various techniques to communicate design intent. Topics covered include: rapid visualization, product development, user experience, works and looks-like prototyping, infographics and data-visualization, design narrative, photo and video editing, and process documentation. Through experience and tangible outcome, students will obtain a measurable shift in their understanding of product development, while improving presentation skills and aesthetic judgment. The goal of this course is not to turn ESTEEM students into designers, but to instruct them on the importance of design decisions to the product development process.

  • EG, SC & Tech Entrepreneurship
  • 1.5 credits    CRN 1593
  • 0 of 55 enrolled
  • F 08:30 AM-12:00 PM 06/25 - 07/23
  • ,

SC 61201 | Design Entrepreneurship

This process-based course introduces various techniques to communicate design intent. Topics covered include: rapid visualization, product development, user experience, works and looks-like prototyping, infographics and data-visualization, design narrative, photo and video editing, and process documentation. Through experience and tangible outcome, students will obtain a measurable shift in their understanding of product development, while improving presentation skills and aesthetic judgment. The goal of this course is not to turn ESTEEM students into designers, but to instruct them on the importance of design decisions to the product development process.

  • EG, SC & Tech Entrepreneurship
  • 1.5 credits    CRN 1592
  • 0 of 55 enrolled
  • F 01:00 PM-04:30 PM 06/25 - 07/23
  • ,

SC 63602 | Entrepreneurial Thinking

The Entrepreneurial Thinking Course introduces the concepts inherent within the Entrepreneurial Mindset. Emphasis will be on the complexity and scope of the challenges that entrepreneurs face, the critical decisions they make, and the actions they take. Additionally, students will explore the foundations of the Business Model Canvas as it relates to startup generation.

  • EG, SC & Tech Entrepreneurship
  • 1.5 credits    CRN 1590
  • 0 of 55 enrolled
  • MTWRF 08:30 AM-11:40 AM 06/21 - 06/29
  • ZCSC,

SC 63606 | Entrepreneurial Accounting

The Entrepreneurial Accounting Course is focused upon the basic concepts and standards underlying financial accounting systems as they relate to entrepreneurship. Several important concepts will be studied in detail, including: revenue recognition, inventory, long-lived assets, present value, and long term liabilities. The course emphasizes the construction of the basic financial accounting statements: the income statement, balance sheet, and cash flow statement.

  • EG, SC & Tech Entrepreneurship
  • 1.5 credits    CRN 1591
  • 0 of 55 enrolled
  • ,

SC 68303 | ESTEEM Capstone Project

This course is the completion of the Thesis Project for the ESTEEM program. The end result is a thesis that describes in depth the intellectual property/technology embodied in the thesis project, applications, commercialization of the technology and culminating in a business plan.

  • EG, SC & Tech Entrepreneurship
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1594
  • 0 of 55 enrolled
  • F 10:00 AM-12:00 PM 06/18 - 06/18 |R 03:00 PM-05:00 PM 07/01 - 07/22
  • ,

James Leady

FIN 24150 | Fundamentals of Finance
James Leady

This course is required for finance majors and a grade of "C" or higher is a prerequisite for continuing in the finance major. The course provides an in-depth and quantitative examination of the principles of financial decision-making. Students learn the concepts of value maximization, mathematics of finance, valuation of financial securities, capital investment evaluation, and the estimation of required rates of return. <p> Note: this course is delivered fully online. The course design combines required live weekly meetings online with self-scheduled lectures, problems, assignments, and interactive learning materials. To participate, students will need to have a computer with webcam, reliable internet connection, and a quiet place to participate in live sessions. <P>This course is required for finance majors and a grade of "C" or higher is a prerequisite for continuing in the finance major. The course provides an in-depth and quantitative examination of the principles of financial decision-making. Students learn the concept of value maximization, mathematics of finance, valuation of financial securities, capital investment evaluation, the estimation of required rates of return, and the theory of capital structure.

  • Finance
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1411
  • 0 of 48 enrolled
  • TR 06:00 PM-08:00 PM 05/31 - 07/15
  • BA02,OLF,ZODO,

John Stiver

FIN 30220 | Macroeconomic Analysis
John Stiver

The course addresses topics including the goals of economic policy, national income accounting, theory of income determination and the determination and behavior of economic aggregates, such as total output and the price level.

  • Finance
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1269
  • 0 of 40 enrolled
  • TBA 06/14 - 07/23
  • BA03,

Kristen Collett-Schmitt

FIN 34211 | Managerial Economics
Kristen Collett-Schmitt

This course investigates the relationship between intermediate microeconomic theory and managerial practice. Course topics include analysis of supply and demand, optimization techniques, theories of production and cost, market structure, and strategy. Through a combination of real-world applications, interviews with industry experts, collaborative learning, innovative use of media, and guided practice, students enrolled in this course will strengthen skills required to manage the challenges of the modern business firm. <p> Note: this course is delivered fully online. The course design combines required live weekly meetings online with self-scheduled lectures, problems, assignments, and interactive learning materials. To participate, students will need to have a computer with webcam, reliable internet connection, and a quiet place to participate in live sessions.

  • Finance
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1412
  • 0 of 45 enrolled
  • TR 08:00 PM-09:55 PM 05/31 - 07/09
  • BA03,OLF,ZODO, SOSC,WKSS

Theodore Mandell

FTT 30405 | Intro to Film & TV Production
Theodore Mandell

An introductory Summer course in the fundamentals of writing, shooting, editing, and lighting for narrative film and television productions. This is a summer hands-on course emphasizing creativity, aesthetic, and technical expertise. Students learn the many aspects of filmmaking while making short films of their own. Requirements: Three short digital video assignments, selected readings, and a final exam.

  • Film, Television, and Theatre
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1528
  • 0 of 16 enrolled
  • ZNBL,

Nathaniel Myers

FTT 44600 | Shakespeare and Film
Nathaniel Myers

This course explores the phenomenon of Shakespeare and film, concentrating on the ranges of meaning provoked by the conjunction. We shall be looking at examples of films of Shakespeare plays both early and recent, both in English and in other languages, and both ones that stick close to the conventionalized and historicized conceptualizations of Shakespeare and adaptations at varying degrees of distance toward the erasure of Shakespeare from the text. The transportation of different forms of Shakespearean textualities (printed, theatrical, filmic) and the confrontation with the specificities of film produce a cultural phenomenon whose cultural meanings - meanings as Shakespeare and meanings as film - will be the subject of our investigations. Students will be required to view screenings of films on a regular basis during the semester. <p> Note: this course is delivered fully online. The course design combines required live weekly meetings online with self-scheduled lectures, problems, assignments, and interactive learning materials. To participate, students will need to have a computer with webcam, reliable internet connection, and a quiet place to participate in live sessions.

  • Film, Television, and Theatre
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1293
  • 0 of 25 enrolled
  • TR 04:00 PM-05:30 PM 05/31 - 07/23
  • MESE,OLF,ZODO, FNAR,WKAR

Christine Becker

FTT 45999 | FTT Internship
Christine Becker

Students who successfully complete at least two of the following courses, FTT 30410, FTT 30462 or FTT 30463, may be eligible for an internship at a television station or network, radio station, video production company, film production company or similar media outlet. Interns must work 10-15 hours per week and compile 150 work hours by the end of the semester (120 hours for the summer session) to obtain three credits. Interns will complete a project, mid-semester progress report and a final evaluation paper. NOTE: This course does not count as an upper level course toward the FTT major.

  • Film, Television, and Theatre
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1541
  • 0 of 35 enrolled
  • ZINT,

James Collins

FTT 50000 | Film across the Humanities
James Collins

This Summer course is intended for <b>Notre Dame faculty </b> who would like to incorporate films into their courses but have hesitated to do so because they have had little or no formal training in film studies. I have designed a week-long intensive course that will solve that problem by exposing seminar participants to the different pedagogical strategies they might use to incorporate films in their courses.We will begin with a crash-course in close visual analysis because I think that's the chief source of anxiety. So I've got this image up on the wall, what do I do with it? How do I get my students to be analytical about those images? Then we'll explore the various ways that really productive interdisciplinary study can be achieved through film analysis. How can we use films effectively to pursue aesthetic, political, philosophical, or theological issues? Most importantly, how can we talk about film as a "way of knowing" in what are increasingly visual cultures?During each morning session, I'll introduce a variety of approaches through lecture, scene analysis, and short selected readings. We'll have a screening each day, right after lunch, and then we'll discuss pragmatic utilization of those methods in our afternoon discussions of the film, focusing on specific applications in courses now being taught or in the process of being developed.Screenings and discussions in the Browning Cinema in the Performing Arts Center.

  • Film, Television, and Theatre
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1352
  • 0 of 16 enrolled
  • TBA 06/14 - 07/23
  • ,

Theodore Mandell

FTT 50505 | Intro to Film & TV Production
Theodore Mandell

An introductory course in the fundamentals of writing, shooting, editing, and lighting for narrative film and video productions. This is a summer hands-on course emphasizing creativity, aesthetic, and technical expertise. Students learn the many aspects of filmmaking while making short films of their own using the new facilities in the Marie P. DeBartolo Performing Arts Center. Requirements: Three short digital video assignments, selected readings, and a final exam.

  • Film, Television, and Theatre
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1529
  • 0 of 9 enrolled
  • ZNBL,

Theodore Mandell

FTT 60505 | Intro to Film & TV Production
Theodore Mandell

An introductory Summer course in the fundamentals of writing, shooting, editing, and lighting for narrative film and television productions. This is a summer hands-on course emphasizing creativity, aesthetic, and technical expertise. Students learn the many aspects of filmmaking while making short films of their own. Requirements: Three short digital video assignments, selected readings, and a final exam.

  • Film, Television, and Theatre
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1530
  • 0 of 1 enrolled
  • ,

James Collins

FTT 70000 | Film Across the Humanities
James Collins

This Summer course is intended for <b>graduate students </b> who would like to incorporate films into their courses but have hesitated to do so because they have had little or no formal training in film studies. I have designed a week-long intensive course that will solve that problem by exposing seminar participants to the different pedagogical strategies they might use to incorporate films in their courses.We will begin with a crash-course in close visual analysis because I think that's the chief source of anxiety. So I've got this image up on the wall, what do I do with it? How do I get my students to be analytical about those images? Then we'll explore the various ways that really productive interdisciplinary study can be achieved through film analysis. How can we use films effectively to pursue aesthetic, political, philosophical, or theological issues? Most importantly, how can we talk about film as a "way of knowing" in what are increasingly visual cultures?During each morning session, I'll introduce a variety of approaches through lecture, scene analysis, and short selected readings. We'll have a screening each day, right after lunch, and then we'll discuss pragmatic utilization of those methods in our afternoon discussions of the film, focusing on specific applications in courses now being taught or in the process of being developed.Screenings and discussions in the Browning Cinema in the Performing Arts Center.

  • Film, Television, and Theatre
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1540
  • 0 of 8 enrolled
  • ,

Denise DellaRossa

LLGR 34141 | Berlin Since the War
Denise DellaRossa

In this course we will use the City of Berlin as our classroom to explore German history since the end of World War II. Major historical and political moments will include the Cold War, Confronting National Socialism and the Holocaust, Reunification, and Multi-Ethnic Germany.

  • German
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1381
  • 0 of 18 enrolled
  • IBCL,MESE,ZOBG, HIST,WKHI

LLGR 34142 | Economics of a Green Germany

The course provides a comprehensive overview of the Energiewende - Germany's effort to reshape its energy system, industry, and building sectors into a nuclear-free, low-carbon economy. We will apply a range of analytical methods (economic assessment tools, legal analyses and political science) to shed light on different facets of the Energiewende, and to help understand the public and academic debates around it. We will discuss the technological, social, ethical, legal and political implications in the German context.

  • German
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1382
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ENST,MESE,SUS3,ZOBG,

William Donahue

LLGR 34143 | Berlin Theater
William Donahue

In this course we will sample from Berlin's great theaters?the Staatsoper, the Komische Oper, the Berliner Ensemble (the "Brecht theater"), the Maxim Gorki, the Grips, as well as other venues. The pre-departure assignment will involve reading the plays we will see. We'll meet in advance of each production to discuss staging, text adaptations, acting, dramaturgy, etc. Right after each performance we'll meet again briefly to discuss any issues that require clarification or comment. Then we'll have a follow-up classroom session later in the week to discuss selected matters performance, theme, etc. We'll take advantage of special back-stage tours and meetings with actors and directors. Students write a targeted 1-2 pp. review of each performance.

  • German
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1383
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • MESE,ZOBG, FNAR,LIT,WKAR,WKLI

LLGR 34144 | Arch. and Design in Berlin

Berlin is the ideal place for studying the development of architecture and design and their interrelationship. The city houses famous museums like Werkbundarchiv - Museum der Dinge, Bauhaus Archiv, Kunstgewerbe Museum (Museum of Applied Arts) and Brohan-Museum (Museum of Art and Design). The urban landscape is marked by an architecture created by great architects like Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, who also designed the famous Barcelona Chair. The historical overview starts with the 19th century and continues via Deutscher Werkbund (German Association of Craftsmen) towards the 20th century with the Bauhaus, and finally the latest developments in architecture and design in the 21st century.

  • German
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1387
  • 0 of 15 enrolled
  • ZOBG,ZOGE, FNAR,WKAR

LLGR 34144 | Arch. and Design in Berlin

Berlin is the ideal place for studying the development of architecture and design and their interrelationship. The city houses famous museums like Werkbundarchiv - Museum der Dinge, Bauhaus Archiv, Kunstgewerbe Museum (Museum of Applied Arts) and Brohan-Museum (Museum of Art and Design). The urban landscape is marked by an architecture created by great architects like Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, who also designed the famous Barcelona Chair. The historical overview starts with the 19th century and continues via Deutscher Werkbund (German Association of Craftsmen) towards the 20th century with the Bauhaus, and finally the latest developments in architecture and design in the 21st century.

  • German
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1388
  • 0 of 2 enrolled
  • ZOBG,ZOGE, FNAR,WKAR

Christopher Miller

LLGR 64501 | German Graduate Reading
Christopher Miller

Intended as review for graduate students who wish to take the GRE in German. The final examination of the course, if passed, fulfills the requirements of the GRE.

  • German
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1561
  • 0 of 30 enrolled
  • MTWR 11:30 AM-01:00 PM 06/14 - 07/23
  • OLF,ZODO,

Pamela Butler

GSC 35000 | Internship
Pamela Butler

This course connects students with a community-based partner organization related to the student's interests in career development and social justice. In collaboration with the Director of Undergraduate Studies, students choose a community partner organization for which they serve as an unpaid intern. In fall/spring semesters, students perform 6-8 hours of internship service per week for their chosen internship site, completing a minimum of 80 total hours. During summer session, students work 5-8 weeks full time, as defined by the internship site. Work on-site is overseen by a designated agency supervisor; coursework is supervised and evaluated by the Director of Undergraduate Studies. Students are expected to complete a short set of readings before the internship begins. Additional assignments include: weekly journal entries; a final reflection paper that summarizes the internship experience and explores its connections to the student's Gender Studies education; an updated resume that includes the internship. This course may be taken during any of the three academic sessions in junior or senior year, and may be counted as an elective towards any Gender Studies undergraduate degree.

  • Gender Studies
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1001
  • 0 of 4 enrolled
  • ZINT,

Daniel Hobbins

HIST 30267 | The Middle Ages on Film
Daniel Hobbins

This course will explore modern popular imaginings of the Middle Ages through film. We will view several feature-length films and numerous clips, interspersed with readings from and about the Middle Ages. Together we will discuss and analyze both the texts and films. The films will range from early silent films to Monty Python spoofs to recent blockbusters. I have divided the course into six segments: (1) the Crusades; (2) Eleanor of Aquitaine: wife and mother of kings; (3) Robin Hood; (4) King Arthur; (5) the Black Death; and (6) Joan of Arc Students will write short daily assignments, two short essays, and a final paper or take-home exam. There are two required textbooks and a course packet. The textbooks are Robert Brent Toplin, Reel History: In Defense of Hollywood (2002); and Daniel Hobbins (trans.), The Trial of Joan of Arc.

  • History
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1542
  • 0 of 20 enrolled
  • HBEU,HCT2,HPRE,HTME, HIST,WKHI

Ian Johnson

HIST 30995 | The Road to War
Ian Johnson

This course will explore the origins of the Second World War from 1919 to 1941. Students will engage in the major historiographical debates on the origins of the war, including the Treaty of Versailles, the rise of Hitler, the militarization of Japan, and the question of appeasement. Students will gain an appreciation of the complex interwar political and social environment while wrestling with questions of causation, structure and agency in history.

  • History
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1544
  • 0 of 20 enrolled
  • HCT6, HIST,WKHI

Jennifer Waddell

ITAO 24201 | Statistical Inference Business
Jennifer Waddell

Statistical Inference in Business focuses on using data to make sound inferences about a population based on sample data, especially in business contexts. More specifically, students will learn how to make inferences using test statistics and confidence intervals in contexts of multiple groups and/or multiple variables, with multiple regression and related methods heavily emphasized. Throughout the course, issues of sampling variability, research design, causality, and the assumptions and limitations of the methods are discussed. Students will supplement their conceptual understanding of the material using statistical software. This course is taught fully online. Both synchronous class meetings and asynchronous consumption of material are expected of students.

  • IT, Analytics and Operations
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1342
  • 0 of 48 enrolled
  • MT 10:30 AM-12:05 PM 05/31 - 07/23
  • BA02,OLF,ZODO,

Xiaojing Duan

ITAO 24211 | Coding Fundamentals
Xiaojing Duan

It is very important in the current age of automation and data-driven business models to have a basic understanding of coding, and to acquire some of the skills of programming. This course introduces students to Python, a widely used programming language among data scientists, with the goal of cleaning, modeling, transforming and analyzing data. Students will learn fundamentals of coding, use python packages for acquiring data from various sources, learn skills to slice and dice the data and produce data visualizations. They will gain experience in Python and apply these skills in generating reproducible reports in business contexts. In addition, students will have opportunity to apply programming skills and work on various projects/datasets that are pertinent to all the majors in the business school. This course is taught fully online. Both synchronous class meetings and asynchronous consumption of material are expected of students.

  • IT, Analytics and Operations
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1343
  • 0 of 48 enrolled
  • WR 07:00 PM-08:35 PM 05/31 - 07/23
  • BA02,OLF,ZODO,

Robert Lewandowski

ITAO 24601 | Business Technology&Analytics
Robert Lewandowski

Businesses today generate large amounts of data. Analysts are tasked with using that information to identify trends and problems, improve decision-making, increasing efficiency and optimize business processes. All of this can be achieved using Microsoft Excel and its add-on Business Intelligence tools such as Solver, Power Query and Power Pivot. This fully online course provides an introduction and structure to analyzing what-if scenarios, organizing big data, using relational databases and developing clear data visualizations all using one application - Microsoft Excel. Note: this course is delivered fully online. The course design combines required live weekly meetings online with self-scheduled lectures, problems, assignments, and interactive learning materials. To participate, students will need to have a computer with webcam, reliable internet connection, and a quiet place to participate in live sessions. No financial aid is available for this course.

  • IT, Analytics and Operations
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1295
  • 0 of 48 enrolled
  • WR 10:30 AM-12:05 PM 05/31 - 07/23
  • BA02,OLF,ZODO,

Huy Huynh

ITAO 34221 | Predictive Analytics
Huy Huynh

The unprecedented availability of data and information now allows companies to rely on facts rather than intuition to drive their business decisions. Giant online retailers like Amazon.com investigate customers' browsing histories to recommend products that may be of interest to customers. Banks study the payment patterns of old customers to predict the likelihood that new borrowers will default. Wireless providers analyze usage data to predict customer turnover. Firms can make better strategic and tactical decisions and gain competitive advantages by leveraging the tremendous amount of data now available on the table. We'll study the tools and techniques these companies and others use to make better and faster decisions, and we'll learn about how methods such as data mining can be used to extract knowledge from data. This course is taught fully online. Both synchronous class meetings and asynchronous consumption of material are expected of students.

  • IT, Analytics and Operations
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1498
  • 0 of 24 enrolled
  • M 08:00 PM-10:00 PM 05/31 - 07/23
  • BAMC,OLF,ZODO,

Vania Smith Allen

KSGA 20002 | Global Cultural Worlds
Vania Smith Allen

This course introduces students to the field of social-cultural anthropology. Cultural anthropologists are primarily interested in exploring issues of human cultural diversity across cultures and through time. This course will explore key theoretical, topical, and ethical issues of interest to cultural anthropologists. We will examine diverse ways in which people around the globe have constructed social organizations (such as kinship, and political and economic systems) and cultural identities (such as gender, ethnicity, nationality, race, and class) and we will consider the impact of increasing globalization on such processes. Throughout the course we will consider how different anthropologists go about their work as they engage in research and as they represent others through the writing of ethnographies.

  • Keough School - Global Affairs
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1272
  • 0 of 2 enrolled
  • GLBC, SOSC,WKSS

Maureen Collins

LLR 68000 | Independent Summer Research
Maureen Collins

This course is for graduate students receiving a summer stipend and conducting independent research. Registering for this course will ensure proper classification for tax purposes. Only those students both actively engaged in research and receiving a stipend are eligible for this course.

  • Romance Lang & Lit
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1060
  • 0 of 500 enrolled
  • ,

Robert Essig

MARK 34651 | Contemporary Sales Management
Robert Essig

A study of the role of the salesperson and the function of sales management in creating close and productive buyer-seller relationships in the business-to-business domain. Emphases in the course are placed on trends affecting the sales person's role, the effects of the internal and external environment on the selling function, and the value of the salesperson to the firm and society.

  • Marketing
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1410
  • 0 of 20 enrolled
  • TR 08:00 PM-10:00 PM 05/31 - 07/23
  • BAMC,OLF,ZODO,

Jacob Landgraf

MATH 10110 | Principles of Finite Math.
Jacob Landgraf

For students in arts and letters. For first-year students who lack the necessary background for MATH 10120. (Students who take this course cannot take MATH 10120. Topics include the fundamental principles of counting systematically, probability, statistics, linear programming, optimization problems, game theory and mathematical finance, population problems, and coding information. There is a wealth of applications of these topics to contemporary social, economic, and political issues appealing to liberal arts students. Also, these topics broaden a student's mathematical horizon in an interesting direction not covered by calculus, which deals mostly with continuous models.

  • Mathematics
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1249
  • 0 of 30 enrolled
  • ZFYS, MATH,WKQR

Nicolas Chavarria Gomez

MATH 10250 | Elements of Calculus I
Nicolas Chavarria Gomez

For students in arts and letters, architecture, or business. A study of basic calculus as part of a liberal education. It emphasizes conceptual learning and stresses the connections between mathematics and modern society. Topics include functions, limits, derivatives, and an introduction to integral, with interesting real-life applications throughout. Students are familiarized with the many different interpretations of the derivative as a rate of change, and the integral as a total rate of change. This enables them to learn and practice modeling in a variety of situations from economics the social and the life sciences.

  • Mathematics
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1250
  • 0 of 30 enrolled
  • BA01,ZFYS, MATH,WKQR

Dmytro Voloshyn

MATH 10250 | Elements of Calculus I
Dmytro Voloshyn

For students in arts and letters, architecture, or business. A study of basic calculus as part of a liberal education. It emphasizes conceptual learning and stresses the connections between mathematics and modern society. Topics include functions, limits, derivatives, and an introduction to integral, with interesting real-life applications throughout. Students are familiarized with the many different interpretations of the derivative as a rate of change, and the integral as a total rate of change. This enables them to learn and practice modeling in a variety of situations from economics the social and the life sciences.

  • Mathematics
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1251
  • 0 of 30 enrolled
  • BA01,ZFYS, MATH,WKQR

Kathryn Mulholland

MATH 14360 | Calculus B
Kathryn Mulholland

This is a second-semester calculus course designed for biology and social science majors. It is required for all premedical students. Mathematics plays a prominent role in the understanding of complex systems in modern biology and social science. This course aims to develop basic mathematical literacy in students for this modern era. Students will acquire skills needed for a quantitative approach to scientific problems and the mathematics needed to study change in a quantity. Topics include integration techniques, solution of differential equations, geometric series, Taylor series and their applications to physics, geometry and ecology. Pre-requisites: First semester calculus or freshmen calculus. <p> Note: this course is delivered fully online. The course design combines required live weekly meetings online with self-scheduled lectures, problems, assignments, and interactive learning materials. To participate, students will need to have a computer with webcam, reliable internet connection, and a quiet place to participate in live sessions.

  • Mathematics
  • 4.0 credits    CRN 1297
  • 0 of 25 enrolled
  • MW 10:00 AM-12:00 PM 05/31 - 07/23
  • OLF,ZODO, MATH,WKQR

Sarah Petersen

MATH 14360 | Calculus B
Sarah Petersen

This is a second-semester calculus course designed for biology and social science majors. It is required for all premedical students. Mathematics plays a prominent role in the understanding of complex systems in modern biology and social science. This course aims to develop basic mathematical literacy in students for this modern era. Students will acquire skills needed for a quantitative approach to scientific problems and the mathematics needed to study change in a quantity. Topics include integration techniques, solution of differential equations, geometric series, Taylor series and their applications to physics, geometry and ecology. Pre-requisites: First semester calculus or freshmen calculus. <p> Note: this course is delivered fully online. The course design combines required live weekly meetings online with self-scheduled lectures, problems, assignments, and interactive learning materials. To participate, students will need to have a computer with webcam, reliable internet connection, and a quiet place to participate in live sessions.

  • Mathematics
  • 4.0 credits    CRN 1298
  • 0 of 25 enrolled
  • MW 06:00 PM-08:00 PM 05/31 - 07/23
  • OLF,ZODO, MATH,WKQR

Lizda Nazdira Moncada Morales

MATH 24550 | Calculus III
Lizda Nazdira Moncada Morales

This is an online course with required, regular class sessions each week. Class meetings are online via Zoom webinar software (provided by the University). A comprehensive treatment of differential and integral calculus of several variables. Topics include space curves, surfaces, functions of several variables, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, line integrals, surface integrals, Stokes theorem, and applications. <p> Note: this course is delivered fully online. The course design combines required live weekly meetings online with self-scheduled lectures, problems, assignments, and interactive learning materials. To participate, students will need to have a computer with webcam, reliable internet connection, and a quiet place to participate in live sessions.

  • Mathematics
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1346
  • 0 of 30 enrolled
  • TR 10:00 AM-12:00 PM 05/31 - 07/23
  • CHSE,MSCE,NBSE,OLF,ZODO, WKQR

Aaron Tyrrell

MATH 24550 | Calculus III
Aaron Tyrrell

This is an online course with required, regular class sessions each week. Class meetings are online via Zoom webinar software (provided by the University). A comprehensive treatment of differential and integral calculus of several variables. Topics include space curves, surfaces, functions of several variables, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, line integrals, surface integrals, Stokes theorem, and applications. <p> Note: this course is delivered fully online. The course design combines required live weekly meetings online with self-scheduled lectures, problems, assignments, and interactive learning materials. To participate, students will need to have a computer with webcam, reliable internet connection, and a quiet place to participate in live sessions.

  • Mathematics
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1347
  • 0 of 30 enrolled
  • TR 06:00 PM-08:00 PM 05/31 - 07/23
  • CHSE,MSCE,NBSE,OLF,ZODO, WKQR

Brian Mulholland

MATH 24580 | Intro Linear Alg and Diff Eqtn
Brian Mulholland

An introduction to linear algebra and to first-and second-order differential equations. Topics include elementary matrices, LU factorization, QR factorization, the matrix of a linear transformation, change of basis, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, solving first-order differential equations and second-order linear differential equations, and initial value problems. This course is part of a two-course sequence that continues with Math 30650 (325). Credit is not given for both Math 20580 (228) and Math 20610 (221).

  • Mathematics
  • 4.0 credits    CRN 1299
  • 0 of 25 enrolled
  • TR 06:00 PM-08:00 PM 05/31 - 07/23
  • OLF,ZODO, MATH,WKQR

MATH 46800 | Directed Readings

Consent of director of undergraduate studies in mathematics is required.

  • Mathematics
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1225
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • CHSE,ZUG4,

MATH 86700 | Directed Readings

Readings not covered in the curriculum which relate to the student's area of interest.

  • Mathematics
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1226
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

MATH 88900 | Research and Dissertation

Research and dissertation for resident graduate students.

  • Mathematics
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1227
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

MATH 98900 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch

Required of nonresident graduate students who are completing their dissertations in absentia and who wish to retain their degree status.

  • Mathematics
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1228
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Jeffrey Harden

SOC 34815 | How to (Not) Lie with Stats
Jeffrey Harden

How will Amazon HQ2 impact local economies? Should parents allow kids to have screen time? What role did demographic shifts in suburban areas play in the 2016 and 2018 elections? Does the infield shift work? Modern society constantly faces questions that require data, statistics, and other empirical evidence to answer well. But the proliferation of niche media outlets, the rise of fake news, and the increase in academic research retraction makes navigating potential answers to these questions difficult. This course is designed to give students tools to confront this challenge by developing their statistical and information literacy skills. It will demonstrate how data and statistical analyses are susceptible to a wide variety of known and implicit biases, which may ultimately lead consumers of information to make problematic choices. The course will consider this issue from the perspectives of consumers of research as well as researchers themselves. We will discuss effective strategies for reading and interpreting quantitative research while considering the incentives researchers face in producing it. Ultimately, students will complete the class better equipped to evaluate empirical claims made by news outlets, social media, or their peers. The goal is to encourage students to approach data-driven answers to important questions with appropriate tools rather than blind acceptance or excessive skepticism.

  • Data Science (MDSC)
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1309
  • 0 of 4 enrolled
  • TR 07:30 PM-09:30 PM 05/31 - 07/23
  • OLF,ZODO,

Catherine Bronson

CLAS 40028 | Classical/Qur'anic Arabic II
Catherine Bronson

The goal of this course is to continue to develop a basic knowledge of Classical/Qur'anic Arabic, with an emphasis on an overview of grammar and syntax, vocabulary acquisition, and serial readings of Islamic texts. We will read selections from Qur'an, Qur'anic exegeses, hadith (Prophetic tradition), and other related material, such as Islamic legal texts. We will learn how to use Arabic/Islamic bibliographical references (in print and online).

  • Arabic Language and Literature
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1536
  • 0 of 25 enrolled
  • ALLN,

Catherine Bronson

CLAS 60028 | Classical/Qur'anic Arabic II
Catherine Bronson

The goal of this course is to continue to develop a basic knowledge of the Classical/Qur'anic Arabic, with an emphasis on an overview of grammar and syntax, vocabulary acquisition, and serial readings of Islamic texts. We will read selections from Qur'an, Qur'anic exegeses, hadith (Prophetic tradition), and other related material, such as Islamic legal texts. We will learn how to use Arabic/Islamic bibliographical references (in print and online). No prerequisite.

  • Arabic Language and Literature
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1537
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Kristopher Muir

MGTO 24105 | Principles of Management
Kristopher Muir

You were likely born in an organization. Right now you are being taught in an organization. One day you will work in an organization. You will rely on organizations to obtain basic necessities, to participate in activities, and for many facets of life. Organizations emerge because individuals can't or don't want to accomplish their goals alone. Therefore, an organization is most often defined as a collective oriented toward a common goal. Management involves formulating that goal and then helping people achieve it.

  • Management & Organization
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1300
  • 0 of 40 enrolled
  • MW 08:00 PM-09:55 PM 05/31 - 07/23
  • BA02,OLF,ZODO,

Daniel Hobbins

MI 30284 | The Middle Ages on Film
Daniel Hobbins

This course will explore modern popular imaginings of the Middle Ages through film. We will view several feature-length films and numerous clips, interspersed with readings from and about the Middle Ages. Together we will discuss and analyze both the texts and films. The films will range from early silent films to Monty Python spoofs to recent blockbusters. I have divided the course into six segments: (1) the Crusades; (2) Eleanor of Aquitaine: wife and mother of kings; (3) Robin Hood; (4) King Arthur; (5) the Black Death; and (6) Joan of ArcStudents will write short daily assignments, two short essays, and a final paper or take-home exam. There are two required textbooks and a course packet. The textbooks are Robert Brent Toplin, Reel History: In Defense of Hollywood (2002); and Daniel Hobbins (trans.), The Trial of Joan of Arc.

  • Medieval Institute
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1576
  • 0 of 1 enrolled
  • , HIST,WKHI

Christopher Miller

MI 46020 | Directed Readings-Undergrad
Christopher Miller

Offers advanced undergraduate students a possibility to work closely with a professor in preparing a topic mutually agreed upon.

  • Medieval Institute
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1577
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Christopher Miller

MI 56002 | Senior Research Project
Christopher Miller

This class offers a student a chance to research a topic in medieval studies and submit a major research project to the professor for the final grade. The project does not have to be a traditional term paper but can take the form of an experiment, exhibit, artwork, or other creation determined in conjunction with the professor.

  • Medieval Institute
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1578
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

MI 66020 | Directed Readings-Grad

Offers graduate students a possibility, normally in their second or third year, to work closely with a professor in preparing a topic mutually agreed upon. Student and professor must sign a form that records the readings.

  • Medieval Institute
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1579
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Maureen Collins

MI 67890 | Independent Summer Research
Maureen Collins

This course is for graduate students receiving a summer stipend and conducting independent research. Registering for this course will ensure proper classification for tax purposes. Only those students both actively engaged in research and receiving a stipend are eligible for this course.

  • Medieval Institute
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1580
  • 0 of 500 enrolled
  • ,

MI 77001 | Field Examination Preparation

Offers students a possibility, normally in their second or third year, to work closely with a professor in preparing for one of their field examinations.

  • Medieval Institute
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1581
  • 0 of 30 enrolled
  • ,

MI 77002 | Dissertation Proposal Prep

Offers students the opportunity to work with their adviser in preparing their dissertation proposal.

  • Medieval Institute
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1582
  • 0 of 30 enrolled
  • ,

MI 77011 | Nonresident Field Exam Prep

Offers nonresident students a possibility, normally in their second or third year, to work closely with a professor in preparing for one of their field examinations.

  • Medieval Institute
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1583
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

MI 88001 | Resident Dissertation Research

Independent research and writing on an approved subject under the direction of a faculty member.

  • Medieval Institute
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1584
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

MI 88002 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch

Required of nonresident graduate students who are completing their theses in absentia and who wish to retain their degree status.

  • Medieval Institute
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1585
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

MNA 60110 | Management Communication

This highly compact course offers a brief survey of the communication processes, skills, theories and applications at work in the not-for-profit organizations of the North American marketplace. You will examine authentic management problems in the NFP arena, including a broad range of organizations, business models, and missions. Assessment of writing and speaking abilities, along with specific feedback to improve performance, are an important part of this one-week course open only to Master of Science in Non-profit Administration degree candidates.

  • Master of Nonprofit Admin.
  • 1.5 credits    CRN 1549
  • 0 of 40 enrolled
  • MTWFS 08:00 AM-12:00 PM 06/28 - 07/03
  • ,

Lisa Dubose

MNA 60210 | Human Resource Management
Lisa Dubose

Proceeding from a discussion of various theories of managing people in organizations, this course enhances management skills and the understanding of how different strategies are most effectively employed in nonprofit organizations. Management of both professional staff and volunteers is emphasized.

  • Master of Nonprofit Admin.
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1548
  • 0 of 40 enrolled
  • MTWFS 08:00 AM-12:00 PM 06/14 - 06/19 |MTWRF 08:00 AM-12:00 PM 06/21 - 06/25
  • ,

Kenneth Milani, Edward Hums

MNA 60310 | Accounting in a Nonprofit Org.
Kenneth Milani, Edward Hums

Financial and managerial accounting principles, processes and practices in a nonprofit entity are the focus of this course. In financial accounting, basic financial statements (i.e., balance sheet, activity or income statement, and the statement of cash flows) are prepared and analyzed. The managerial accounting emphasis is on budgeting along with variance generation, analysis and interpretation. In addition, coverage includes the statement of functional expenses and the basic terminology and techniques of fund accounting.

  • Master of Nonprofit Admin.
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1557
  • 0 of 50 enrolled
  • MTWF 01:00 PM-05:00 PM 06/14 - 06/25 |S 09:00 AM-01:00 PM 06/26 - 06/26
  • ,

Joel Urbany

MNA 60410 | Marketing for Nonprofits
Joel Urbany

This course discusses the marketing needs and approaches particular to nonprofit organizations. Included are the development of skills needed to create, implement and refine effective marketing programs for nonprofits.

  • Master of Nonprofit Admin.
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1558
  • 0 of 40 enrolled
  • MTWFS 08:00 AM-12:00 PM 06/28 - 07/03 |MTWF 08:00 AM-12:00 PM 07/05 - 07/09
  • ,

Aimee Cole-Laramore

MNA 60510 | Board Relations & Management
Aimee Cole-Laramore

This course focuses on the development, composition, roles and responsibilities of boards of directors for nonprofits. The partnership between the organizational executive and board in identifying and addressing management and development challenges is explored through case studies and class discussion. Students formulate action plans to resolve problems in board management.

  • Master of Nonprofit Admin.
  • 1.5 credits    CRN 1567
  • 0 of 40 enrolled
  • MTWFS 08:00 AM-12:00 PM 06/28 - 07/03 |MTWRF 08:00 AM-12:00 PM 07/05 - 07/09
  • ,

Angela Logan

MNA 60510 | Board Relations & Management
Angela Logan

This course focuses on the development, composition, roles and responsibilities of boards of directors for nonprofits. The partnership between the organizational executive and board in identifying and addressing management and development challenges is explored through case studies and class discussion. Students formulate action plans to resolve problems in board management.

  • Master of Nonprofit Admin.
  • 1.5 credits    CRN 1550
  • 0 of 40 enrolled
  • MTWRF 08:00 AM-12:00 PM 07/05 - 07/09
  • ,

Kristen Collett-Schmitt

MNA 70110 | Economics - NFP Enterprises
Kristen Collett-Schmitt

This course is concerned with the application of microeconomic principles to the managerial decision making process with extensive applications to the nonprofit sector. Students will analyze the demand for services; the cost to the agency of providing those services; and the internal organizational architecture of the entity providing those services. Some key concepts discussed are demand elasticity, incremental cost, the competitive assumption of perfect information, price discrimination, barriers to entry, and the assignment of decision rights.

  • Master of Nonprofit Admin.
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1555
  • 0 of 40 enrolled
  • MTWF 01:00 PM-05:00 PM 06/14 - 06/19 |S 01:00 PM-05:00 PM 06/19 - 06/19 |MTWF 01:00 PM-05:00 PM 06/21 - 06/25
  • ,

Steven Sollmann

MNA 70210 | Financial Management
Steven Sollmann

This course introduces students to the fundamental concepts and tools of financial analysis. Topics covered include: valuation theory and the risk-return trade-off, financial statement analysis, the time value of money, financial markets, and the valuation of securities and capital investments.

  • Master of Nonprofit Admin.
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1569
  • 0 of 40 enrolled
  • MTWFS 01:00 PM-05:00 PM 06/28 - 07/03 |MTWF 01:00 PM-05:00 PM 07/05 - 07/09
  • ,

Jennifer Waddell

MNA 70310 | Decision Analysis & Statistics
Jennifer Waddell

This course develops students' capacities to analyze and design operating processes by using information technologies to analyze data. Projects are designed to teach students how to interpret and weigh data and to use mathematical/computer models as tools for effective decision making and refinement of functional and strategic processes.

  • Master of Nonprofit Admin.
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1554
  • 0 of 40 enrolled
  • MTWFS 01:00 PM-05:00 PM 06/28 - 07/10
  • ,

Joseph Holt

MNA 70410 | Ethics in Nonprofit Orgs
Joseph Holt

This course exams ethical issues and value dilemmas facing the nonprofit manager and the nonprofit organization. Emphasis is on the formulation and implementation of organizational social policy, the development of sensitivity to moral and economic values within situations, and enhancing the ability to examine complex ethical situations and make action decisions. The role of the nonprofit manager as both a professional and an ethical leader is explored through case studies which examine ethical issues in contemporary nonprofit organizations.

  • Master of Nonprofit Admin.
  • 1.5 credits    CRN 1551
  • 0 of 40 enrolled
  • MTWRF 08:00 AM-12:00 PM 06/14 - 06/18
  • ,

John Michel

MNA 70610 | Planning & Policy
John Michel

This course is designed to integrate the knowledge, skills and techniques obtained from previous courses. Emphasis is placed on the formation of a nonprofit organizational strategy through the development of a mission statement, strategic objectives and plans for implementation of the strategy.

  • Master of Nonprofit Admin.
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1553
  • 0 of 40 enrolled
  • MTWRF 09:00 AM-12:00 PM 07/12 - 07/16 |MTWR 09:00 AM-12:00 PM 07/19 - 07/22
  • ,

Philip Newbold

MNA 70740 | Nonprofit Mgmt & Ldg Scl Impct
Philip Newbold

Management in Nonprofit Corporations presents a highly specialized and unique set of challenges. Although primarily a service sector, customers/stakeholders/financial resources are often other than the direct recipients of service. This poses a unique challenge for how the organization is organized, staffed, positioned, and led to deliver both mission and market relevant outcomes. In addition, due to new and emerging external pressures, nonprofits are being forced to consider new paradigms, which are increasingly more strategic and entrepreneurial, often resulting in conflict between traditional mission aspirations and current market realities. This course will explore the managerial skills and organizational strategies necessary for successful nonprofit organizations.

  • Master of Nonprofit Admin.
  • 1.5 credits    CRN 1552
  • 0 of 40 enrolled
  • MTWRF 08:00 AM-12:00 PM 06/21 - 06/25
  • ,

Frederick Nwanganga

MBAE 70450 | Unstructured Data Analytics
Frederick Nwanganga

This course will introduce the fundamental concepts of machine learning, with a focus on the most common techniques and applications used by practitioners for both supervised and unsupervised learning using R. Besides being introduced to techniques for data acquisition, preparation and exploration, students will learn how to choose an appropriate machine learning model, train the model, evaluate the model and draw meaningful insight from the results. The machine learning algorithms and methods covered in the course include logistic regression methods, bayesian classification, neural networks, support vector machines, random forest classification, clustering, association rules and ensemble techniques. The course will also briefly explore text mining for sentiment analysis as well as the emerging area of deep learning and how it is driving advances in artificial intelligence that are helping change the world.

  • Master of Sc in Bus Analytics
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 1524
  • 0 of 28 enrolled
  • F 08:00 AM-02:30 PM 05/28 - 05/28 |M 08:00 AM-12:15 PM 06/07 - 06/07 |T 08:00 AM-02:30 PM 06/08 - 06/08 |W 02:45 PM-05:30 PM 06/09 - 06/09 |F 01:15 PM-05:30 PM 06/18 - 06/18 |F 08:00 AM-10:45 PM 07/02 - 07/02
  • ZOCG,

Jennifer Cronin

MBAE 70520 | Data Storytelling
Jennifer Cronin

A principal challenge for anyone working with ubiquitous data is communicating results of an analysis to stakeholders. This course teaches students the art of clear, effective, and engaging data presentation with attention to the business necessity of translating complex technical subjects into actionable insights for a lay audience. Students will harness the power of storytelling for the strategic benefit of an organization by turning a raw set of data into a compelling message that resonates with an intended audience.

  • Master of Sc in Bus Analytics
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 1525
  • 0 of 28 enrolled
  • F 02:45 PM-05:30 PM 05/28 - 05/28 |S 02:45 PM-05:30 PM 05/29 - 05/29 |M 01:15 PM-05:30 PM 06/07 - 06/07 |T 02:45 PM-05:30 PM 06/08 - 06/08 |R 02:45 PM-05:30 PM 06/10 - 06/10 |F 08:00 AM-12:15 PM 06/18 - 06/18
  • ,

Warren von Eschenbach

MBAE 70600 | Ethics in Business Analytics
Warren von Eschenbach

As companies and government entities accumulate vast quantities of data regarding details aspects of economic transactions, social interactions, and other potentially sensitive information, we are likely to see more and more impact on our lives and on society in general. This course provides a survey of ethical issues that arise in the context of "big data" analytics in both the private and the public sectors, including issues related to identity, privacy, ownership of information, and both personal and corporate reputation. Students will get an overview of current practices, issues, and concerns.

  • Master of Sc in Bus Analytics
  • 1.5 credits    CRN 1526
  • 0 of 28 enrolled
  • R 08:00 AM-02:30 PM 06/10 - 06/10 |S 02:45 PM-05:30 PM 06/19 - 06/19 |F 11:00 AM-05:30 PM 07/02 - 07/02 |S 08:00 AM-10:45 AM 07/03 - 07/03 |S 08:00 AM-10:45 AM 07/17 - 07/17
  • ZOCG,

Don Kleinmuntz

MBAE 70650 | Time Series Analysis
Don Kleinmuntz

Introduction to the use of statistical analysis of time series data, building on previous courses in statistics techniques to build and deploy forecasting models. Emphasis will be placed on analysis of economic data relevant to a range of problems in business and finance.

  • Master of Sc in Bus Analytics
  • 2.0 credits    CRN 1527
  • 0 of 28 enrolled
  • S 08:00 AM-02:30 PM 05/29 - 05/29 |W 08:00 AM-02:30 PM 06/09 - 06/09 |S 08:00 AM-02:30 PM 06/19 - 06/19 |S 11:00 AM-05:30 PM 07/03 - 07/03 |F 08:00 AM-10:45 AM 07/16 - 07/16
  • ZOCG,

Gianna Bern

MBAE 60100 | Financial Statement Analysis 1
Gianna Bern

Financial Statement Analysis is about understanding financial statements including income, balance sheets, and cash flow. It also covers ratio, common size, segment, and peer comparisons. Through this course you will learn credit analysis and in-depth study of different categories of assets and liabilities.

  • Master of Science in Finance
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1496
  • 0 of 35 enrolled
  • F 01:30 PM-05:30 PM 05/28 - 05/28 |S 01:30 PM-05:30 PM 05/29 - 05/29 |F 01:30 PM-05:30 PM 06/11 - 06/11 |S 01:30 PM-05:30 PM 06/12 - 06/12 |F 01:00 PM-04:30 PM 06/25 - 06/25 |S 01:00 PM-04:30 PM 06/26 - 06/26 |F 01:00 PM-04:30 PM 07/09 - 07/09 |S 01:00 PM-04:30 PM 07/10 - 07/10
  • ,

D. Katherine Spiess

MBAE 60400 | Corporate Finance
D. Katherine Spiess

This course is about corporate governance, cost of capital, capital budgeting, capital structure, security issuance, and payout policy.

  • Master of Science in Finance
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1497
  • 0 of 35 enrolled
  • F 08:30 AM-12:30 PM 05/28 - 05/28 |S 08:30 AM-12:30 PM 05/29 - 05/29 |F 08:30 AM-12:30 PM 06/11 - 06/11 |S 08:30 AM-12:30 PM 06/12 - 06/12 |F 08:30 AM-12:00 PM 06/25 - 06/25 |S 08:30 AM-12:00 PM 06/26 - 06/26 |F 08:30 AM-12:00 PM 07/09 - 07/09 |S 08:30 AM-12:00 PM 07/10 - 07/10
  • ZOCG,

Robert Battalio

MBAE 70645 | Forwards & Futures Fund.
Robert Battalio

Forward markets for future delivery of various commodities goes back to at least ancient Greece. In this course, we will construct payoff diagrams for basic forward contracts to better understand why forwards are powerful tools that can be used to hedge various types of risk. Next, we will examine how forwards are priced. We will conclude by examining why organized futures markets formed in the 19th century and why futures have displaced forwards as cost effective risk management tools. After taking this course, students should have an understanding of why futures are traded and have a basic understanding of how they are priced.

  • Master of Science in Finance
  • 1.5 credits    CRN 1587
  • 0 of 35 enrolled
  • FS 08:30 AM-05:30 PM 07/23 - 07/24
  • ZOCG,

Kristopher Muir

MBA 60110 | Principles of Management
Kristopher Muir

The goal of this course is to study the management process, which includes planning, organizing, staffing, directing and controlling. The related topics of executive leadership, organizational behavior and management theory will be covered. By applying theories of human behavior, this course will help students solve day-to-day problems of organizational administration and become more effective managers.

  • Master of Science in Mgtment
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1574
  • 0 of 40 enrolled
  • MTWR 11:00 AM-12:35 PM 06/14 - 07/02
  • ,

Kristopher Muir

MBA 60110 | Principles of Management
Kristopher Muir

The goal of this course is to study the management process, which includes planning, organizing, staffing, directing and controlling. The related topics of executive leadership, organizational behavior and management theory will be covered. By applying theories of human behavior, this course will help students solve day-to-day problems of organizational administration and become more effective managers.

  • Master of Science in Mgtment
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1575
  • 0 of 40 enrolled
  • MTWR 01:00 PM-02:35 PM 06/14 - 07/02
  • ,

Joshua Seachris

PHIL 24150 | Introduction to Philosophy
Joshua Seachris

A general introduction to philosophy, which may cover introductory topics in either topically or historically, with a focus on introducing students to some of the perennial problems and texts of philosophy. Specific course content varies by semester and by instructor. This course is offered online only.

  • Philosophy
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1301
  • 0 of 25 enrolled
  • TR 10:00 AM-12:00 PM 05/31 - 07/23
  • OLF,ZODO, PHIL,WKFP

Mark Puestohl

PHIL 24150 | Introduction to Philosophy
Mark Puestohl

A general introduction to philosophy, which may cover introductory topics in either topically or historically, with a focus on introducing students to some of the perennial problems and texts of philosophy. Specific course content varies by semester and by instructor. This course is offered online only.

  • Philosophy
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1302
  • 0 of 25 enrolled
  • TR 06:00 PM-08:00 PM 05/31 - 07/23
  • OLF,ZODO, PHIL,WKFP

Charlene Brecevic

PHIL 24448 | Tech & Innovtion Ethics
Charlene Brecevic

This course will closely consider the ethical responsibilities inherent in the process of technological innovation from the perspective of the innovator. Innovation is here broadly framed as ethical and social intervention in the life of users and society rather than merely technical invention. Topics covered include the nature of responsibility, values in design, the roles of regulation and of business models, and cases from social media, AI, and robotics.

  • Philosophy
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1303
  • 0 of 25 enrolled
  • MWR 06:00 PM-07:30 PM 05/31 - 07/23
  • OLF,ZODO, PHI2,WKSP

Mark Bourgeois

PHIL 24448 | Tech & Innovtion Ethics
Mark Bourgeois

This course will closely consider the ethical responsibilities inherent in the process of technological innovation from the perspective of the innovator. Innovation is here broadly framed as ethical and social intervention in the life of users and society rather than merely technical invention. Topics covered include the nature of responsibility, values in design, the roles of regulation and of business models, and cases from social media, AI, and robotics.

  • Philosophy
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1304
  • 0 of 25 enrolled
  • TBA 05/31 - 07/23
  • OLF,ZODO, PHI2,WKSP

PHIL 24632 | Robot Ethics

Robots or "autonomous systems" play an ever-increasing role in many areas, from weapons systems and driverless cars to health care and consumer services. As a result, it is ever more important to ask whether it makes any sense to speak of such systems' behaving ethically and how we can build into their programming what some call "ethics modules." After a brief technical introduction to the field, this course will approach these questions through contemporary philosophical literature on robot ethics and through popular media, including science fiction text and video. This is an online course with required, regular class sessions each week. Class meetings are online via Zoom webinar software (provided by the University). <p> Note: this course is delivered fully online. The course design combines required live weekly meetings online with self-scheduled lectures, problems, assignments, and interactive learning materials. To participate, students will need to have a computer with webcam, reliable internet connection, and a quiet place to participate in live sessions.

  • Philosophy
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1305
  • 0 of 15 enrolled
  • TBA 05/31 - 07/23
  • OLF,ZODO, PHI2,WKSP

Tobias Flattery

PHIL 24632 | Robot Ethics
Tobias Flattery

Robots or "autonomous systems" play an ever-increasing role in many areas, from weapons systems and driverless cars to health care and consumer services. As a result, it is ever more important to ask whether it makes any sense to speak of such systems' behaving ethically and how we can build into their programming what some call "ethics modules." After a brief technical introduction to the field, this course will approach these questions through contemporary philosophical literature on robot ethics and through popular media, including science fiction text and video. This is an online course with required, regular class sessions each week. Class meetings are online via Zoom webinar software (provided by the University). <p> Note: this course is delivered fully online. The course design combines required live weekly meetings online with self-scheduled lectures, problems, assignments, and interactive learning materials. To participate, students will need to have a computer with webcam, reliable internet connection, and a quiet place to participate in live sessions.

  • Philosophy
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1308
  • 0 of 25 enrolled
  • TR 06:00 PM-07:30 PM 05/31 - 07/23
  • OLF,ZODO, PHI2,WKSP

Mitchell Wayne, Randal Ruchti

PHYS 08699 | Dir Research Particle Phys
Mitchell Wayne, Randal Ruchti

Directed Research course for high school students combining coverage of topics in particle physics with participation in experimental research in ongoing experiments conducted by particle physics faculty. Students maintain a research logbook and submit a written research summary at the conclusion of the research period.

  • Physics
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1354
  • 0 of 30 enrolled
  • ,

Michael Wiescher

PHYS 08798 | Dir Research in Nuc Astrophys
Michael Wiescher

Directed Research course for high school students combining coverage of topics in nuclear astrophysics with participation in experimental research in ongoing experiments conducted by nuclear astrophysics faculty. Students maintain a research logbook and submit a written research summary at the conclusion of the research period.

  • Physics
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1355
  • 0 of 20 enrolled
  • ,

Thomas Loughran

PHYS 08900 | Physics: iSPI
Thomas Loughran

This is a zero-credit course offered by Notre Dame International for students in the International Summer Physics Institute (iSPI). iSPI is a two-week intensive science program on the most intense and cutting-edge science: particle physics. The program strengthens students' existing knowledge of physics and supplements it with advanced knowledge to investigate questions in physics using particle physics data. For the experiments, students use real data from the Large Hadron Collider at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) laboratory in Switzerland. They assemble and test detectors in the laboratory to study cosmic rays and draw raw data from their particle physics experiments. Students also visit the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) outside of Chicago.

  • Physics
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1356
  • 0 of 100 enrolled
  • ,

PHYS 10140 | Descriptive Astronomy

A description of the motions and structure of the earth, moon, and planets; an exposition of the modern theories of solar and stellar structure, nebulae, and galaxies; basics of stellar evolution, black holes, quasars, and other recent developments; an introduction to cosmology. This course includes elementary observational projects.

  • Physics
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1357
  • 0 of 20 enrolled
  • ZFYS, NASC,WKST

PHYS 20140 | Descriptive Astronomy

A description of the motions and structure of the Earth, moon, and planets. An exposition of the modern theories of solar and stellar structure, nebulae, and galaxies. Basics of stellar evolution, black holes, quasars, and other recent developments. An introduction to cosmology. This course includes elementary observational projects.

  • Physics
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1358
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • , NASC,WKST

Ian Bentley

PHYS 20210 | Physics for Life Sci I
Ian Bentley

The basic principles of mechanics, fluid mechanics, thermal physics, wave motion, and sound. Primarily for students in the life sciences. Laboratory meetings each week. This is the first semester of a 2 semester calculus based course.

  • Physics
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1359
  • 0 of 65 enrolled
  • , NASC,WKST

PHYS 20220 | Physics for Life Sci II

The basic principles of electricity, magnetism, optics, and modern physics. Primarily for students in the life sciences. Laboratory meetings each week. This is the second semester of a 2 semester calculus based course.

  • Physics
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1360
  • 0 of 65 enrolled
  • , NASC,WKST

PHYS 21210 | Physics for Life Sci I Lab

The laboratory is a corequisite for PHYS 20210

  • Physics
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1361
  • 0 of 40 enrolled
  • TR 01:30 PM-03:30 PM 06/14 - 07/23
  • ,

PHYS 21220 | Physics for Life Sci II Lab

The laboratory is a corequisite for PHYS 20220.

  • Physics
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1362
  • 0 of 40 enrolled
  • TR 01:30 PM-03:30 PM 06/14 - 07/23
  • ,

PHYS 48480 | Undergraduate Research

Research in collaboration with members of the faculty. Five to fifteen hours each week, arranged individually for each student. One to three credits.

  • Physics
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1363
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ZUG1,

Umesh Garg

PHYS 48998 | Phys Graded REU
Umesh Garg

This course has been created so that select students can take it for a grade/credit. It is the same as Phys 48999 and will be held at the same time in the same location.

  • Physics
  • 6.0 credits    CRN 1364
  • 0 of 25 enrolled
  • ,

Umesh Garg

PHYS 48999 | Phys REU
Umesh Garg

Students are granted stipends, university housing, and assistance with travel and food expenses. REU program gives valuable research experience, to help students decide if physics research is right for them.

  • Physics
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1365
  • 0 of 29 enrolled
  • ,

PHYS 67001 | Review of Physics A

The Review of Physics sequence is intended to ensure a common conceptual core, mathematical foundation, and problem-solving proficiency for students embarking on graduate studies in physics. This segment of the sequence focuses on classical mechanics, including essential elements of thermodynamics.

  • Physics
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1564
  • 0 of 0 enrolled
  • ,

PHYS 67002 | Review of Physics B

The Review of Physics sequence is intended to ensure a common conceptual core, mathematical foundation, and problem-solving proficiency for students embarking on graduate studies in physics. This segment of the sequence focuses on electromagnetism.

  • Physics
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1565
  • 0 of 0 enrolled
  • ,

PHYS 67003 | Review of Physics C

The Review of Physics sequence is intended to ensure a common conceptual core, mathematical foundation, and problem-solving proficiency for students embarking on graduate studies in physics. This segment of the sequence focuses on quantum mechanics.

  • Physics
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1566
  • 0 of 0 enrolled
  • ,

Maureen Collins

PHYS 67890 | Independent Summer Research
Maureen Collins

This course is for graduate students receiving a summer stipend and conducting independent research. Registering for this course will ensure proper classification for tax purposes. Only those students both actively engaged in research and receiving a stipend are eligible for this course.

  • Physics
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1366
  • 0 of 100 enrolled
  • ,

Mitchell Wayne

PHYS 68000 | QuarkNet Directed Research
Mitchell Wayne

Directed research course for high school teachers (nondoctoral students) combining coverage of topics in particle physics with participation in experimental research in ongoing experiments conducted by particle physics faculty. Students will submit a written research summary at the conclusion of the period.

  • Physics
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1371
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Mitchell Wayne

PHYS 68699 | DirRsrch-Prtcl Physcs-QuarkNet
Mitchell Wayne

Directed research course for high school teachers (nondoctoral students) combining coverage of topics in particle physics with participation in experimental research in ongoing experiments conducted by particle physics faculty. Students will maintain a research logbook and submit a written research summary at the conclusion of the research period.

  • Physics
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1372
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Mark Caprio

PHYS 98699 | Research and Dissertation
Mark Caprio

Research and dissertation for resident graduate students.

  • Physics
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1367
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • ,

Mark Caprio

PHYS 98700 | Nonresident Dissertation Rsrch
Mark Caprio

Required of nonresident graduate students who are completing their dissertations in absentia and who wish to retain their degree status.

  • Physics
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1368
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

Fiorella Sierra

POLS 24200 | International Relations
Fiorella Sierra

The study of International Relations (IR) is the study of human organization at its highest and most complex level. The goal of IR scholarship is thus to try to manage this complexity intellectually by devising theories which help us to understand and predict state behavior. The main purpose of this course, therefore, will be to introduce students to the most important IR theories. These theories will then, in turn, be applied to real-world IR events in order to test their utility in helping us to understand the world as it actually is. By the end of the course, therefore, the student will have a grounding in both theoretical and factual aspects of IR analysis.

  • Political Science
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1409
  • 0 of 30 enrolled
  • MWR 02:00 PM-03:15 PM 05/31 - 07/23
  • OLF,ZODO,ZTST,

POLS 34208 | Economics of a Green Germany

The course provides a comprehensive overview of the Energiewende - Germany's effort to reshape its energy system, industry, and building sectors into a nuclear-free, low-carbon economy. We will apply a range of analytical methods (economic assessment tools, legal analyses and political science) to shed light on different facets of the Energiewende, and to help understand the public and academic debates around it. We will discuss the technological, social, ethical, legal and political implications in the German context.

  • Political Science
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1397
  • 0 of 3 enrolled
  • MESE,MPPE,ZOBG,

Michael Hoffman

POLS 34487 | Identity Politics
Michael Hoffman

Identity politics has recently regained attention as a major force in political behavior. In this course, we will examine the features of identity politics that bear on individuals' political preferences and decisions. Using both historical and contemporary examples, we will analyze the role of identity considerations in electoral behavior, protest, and partisanship, among other areas. Some of the identity categories studied will be race, gender, and religious affiliation. The course includes cases both within the American context and international comparisons.

  • Political Science
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1273
  • 0 of 15 enrolled
  • MWF 01:00 PM-03:05 PM 05/31 - 07/23
  • OLF,ZODO,ZTST,

Jeffrey Harden

POLS 34815 | How to (Not) Lie with Stats
Jeffrey Harden

How will Amazon HQ2 impact local economies? Should parents allow kids to have screen time? What role did demographic shifts in suburban areas play in the 2016 and 2018 elections? Does the infield shift work? Modern society constantly faces questions that require data, statistics, and other empirical evidence to answer well. But the proliferation of niche media outlets, the rise of fake news, and the increase in academic research retraction makes navigating potential answers to these questions difficult. This course is designed to give students tools to confront this challenge by developing their statistical and information literacy skills. It will demonstrate how data and statistical analyses are susceptible to a wide variety of known and implicit biases, which may ultimately lead consumers of information to make problematic choices. The course will consider this issue from the perspectives of consumers of research as well as researchers themselves. We will discuss effective strategies for reading and interpreting quantitative research while considering the incentives researchers face in producing it. Ultimately, students will complete the class better equipped to evaluate empirical claims made by news outlets, social media, or their peers. The goal is to encourage students to approach data-driven answers to important questions with appropriate tools rather than blind acceptance or excessive skepticism.

  • Political Science
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1223
  • 0 of 26 enrolled
  • TR 07:30 PM-09:30 PM 05/31 - 07/23
  • OLF,ZODO,ZTST,

Carolina Arroyo

POLS 45999 | Summer Internship
Carolina Arroyo

Summer internships are an excellent way to explore career options, to gain valuable work experience and to build your resume. Students who have secured an unpaid summer internship can apply for academic credit by contacting the Director of Internships. To qualify for credit, internships must have prior approval, must be unpaid, be at least 6 weeks in duration and provide at least 100 hours of work.

  • Political Science
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1198
  • 0 of 26 enrolled
  • MPPE,ZINT,

POLS 46902 | Directed Readings

Students on the dean's list are eligible for independent study on a topic of the student's choice, under the supervision of a faculty member.

  • Political Science
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1202
  • 0 of 3 enrolled
  • MPPE,

POLS 46902 | Directed Readings

Students on the dean's list are eligible for independent study on a topic of the student's choice, under the supervision of a faculty member.

  • Political Science
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1203
  • 0 of 3 enrolled
  • MPPE,

POLS 47905 | Research Apprenticeship

This variable credit (0 or 1) course offers undergraduates a chance to learn about and participate in the research experience. After several training sessions, students are assigned to a faculty member to work on an ongoing faculty research project.

  • Political Science
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1204
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • MPPE,

POLS 47905 | Research Apprenticeship

This variable credit (0 or 1) course offers undergraduates a chance to learn about and participate in the research experience. After several training sessions, students are assigned to a faculty member to work on an ongoing faculty research project.

  • Political Science
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1205
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • MPPE,

POLS 47905 | Research Apprenticeship

This variable credit (0 or 1) course offers undergraduates a chance to learn about and participate in the research experience. After several training sessions, students are assigned to a faculty member to work on an ongoing faculty research project.

  • Political Science
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1206
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • MPPE,

POLS 47905 | Research Apprenticeship

This variable credit (0 or 1) course offers undergraduates a chance to learn about and participate in the research experience. After several training sessions, students are assigned to a faculty member to work on an ongoing faculty research project.

  • Political Science
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1207
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • MPPE,

POLS 47905 | Research Apprenticeship

This variable credit (0 or 1) course offers undergraduates a chance to learn about and participate in the research experience. After several training sessions, students are assigned to a faculty member to work on an ongoing faculty research project.

  • Political Science
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1208
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • MPPE,

POLS 47905 | Research Apprenticeship

This variable credit (0 or 1) course offers undergraduates a chance to learn about and participate in the research experience. After several training sessions, students are assigned to a faculty member to work on an ongoing faculty research project.

  • Political Science
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1209
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • MPPE,

POLS 58903 | Senior Thesis

Seniors with a grade point average of 3.5 or above are encouraged to write a senior honors thesis. For this project, the student works closely with a faculty member on a topic of the student's choice. The senior honors thesis builds on the student's course work, experience, and interests and trains the student to work deeply and independently. Three credits of this two-semester project fulfill one senior writing seminar requirement. The other three credits can count toward elective credit but not toward the major.

  • Political Science
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1210
  • 0 of 1 enrolled
  • MPPE,ZTST,

Maureen Collins

POLS 67890 | Independent Summer Research
Maureen Collins

This course is for graduate students receiving a summer stipend and conducting independent research. Registering for this course will ensure proper classification for tax purposes. Only those students both actively engaged in research and receiving a stipend are eligible for this course.

  • Political Science
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1229
  • 0 of 100 enrolled
  • ,

Bradley Gibson

PSY 30100 | Experimental Psy I: Statistics
Bradley Gibson

An introduction to the analysis and evaluation of experimental data, with particular emphasis on measures of central tendency, variability, and covariability and their relationship to psychological theory and explanation.

  • Psychology
  • 4.0 credits    CRN 1400
  • 0 of 19 enrolled
  • ZUG2, WKQR

Anre Venter

PSY 30600 | Social Psychology
Anre Venter

An introduction to the major theoretical orientations within the field of experimental social psychology and a survey of the research findings in selected areas such as attitude formation and change, affiliation, interpersonal attraction, and social cognition.

  • Psychology
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1447
  • 0 of 22 enrolled
  • ALSS,PSDP,

John Lubker

PSY 33365 | Sport Psychology
John Lubker

This course will focus on the application of psychological concepts and current research to the enhancement of performance in both sports and fitness activities. An emphasis will be placed on techniques and strategies that have been used effectively to maximize athletic performance. Topics include overview of the field, motivation, personality factors, self-concept, team development, leadership, psychological skills training, and exercise adherence.

  • Psychology
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1571
  • 0 of 16 enrolled
  • PSDP,

Dawn Gondoli

PSY 43363 | Body Image
Dawn Gondoli

In this seminar, we will explore the biological, psychosocial (including peers and family), and cultural factors influencing body image. We will explore impacts of "fitspo" and body esteem messages, and examine alternative means of reducing risk of body dissatisfaction (e.g., self and identity; self-compassion; gratitude). Potential connections between body image and disordered eating will be examined, including analysis of "classical" and contemporary theoretical models. Both basic and applied (i.e., intervention) research will be incorporated, and a lifespan approach will be utilized, examining body image during childhood, adolescence and midlife.

  • Psychology
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1546
  • 0 of 19 enrolled
  • ,

Anre Venter

PSY 43625 | Philosophy of Self
Anre Venter

Who are you? What are you? What is the self? Does it even exist in reality in an absolute sense? What is the nature of social reality and our relationship with it? Social psychology provides some insights into these questions and issues and can inform our thinking and understanding of our selves and our world. Although the broader theoretical and philosophical context for this seminar is social psychological, we will have the opportunity to read about these topics from a variety of sources - psychological, philosophical, and theological.

  • Psychology
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1448
  • 0 of 18 enrolled
  • ZUG2,

Alexandra Corning

PSY 60331 | Clinical Skills& Interventions
Alexandra Corning

Prepares doctoral students in foundational clinical skills and various counseling techniques. (Fall)

  • Psychology
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1559
  • 0 of 6 enrolled
  • ,

REG 10999 | REG Placeholder

Used for section changes requiring capture and movement of class roster.

  • Registrar's Office
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1535
  • 0 of 0 enrolled
  • ,

REG 60999 | Registrar Test Course

Course set for testing purposes and group registration capture.

  • Registrar's Office
  • 0.5 credits    CRN 1370
  • 0 of 15 enrolled
  • 2DCO,

LLR 46000 | Directed Readings

Specialized reading related to the student's area of study.

  • French
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1054
  • 0 of 1 enrolled
  • ,

Alain Toumayan

LLR 63050 | French Graduate Reading
Alain Toumayan

A course designed to prepare students for the Graduate Reading Examination. No prerequisites. Open to undergraduate students by permission of the chair.

  • French
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1573
  • 0 of 16 enrolled
  • ,

Louis MacKenzie

LLR 63050 | French Graduate Reading
Louis MacKenzie

A course designed to prepare students for the Graduate Reading Examination. No prerequisites. Open to undergraduate students by permission of the chair.

  • French
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1033
  • 0 of 16 enrolled
  • ,

LLR 66000 | Directed Readings

Specialized reading related to the student's area of study.

  • French
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1055
  • 0 of 1 enrolled
  • ,

LLR 66000 | Directed Readings

Specialized reading related to the student's area of study.

  • French
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1056
  • 0 of 1 enrolled
  • ,

LLR 67000 | Special Studies

Topics vary by semester.

  • French
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1057
  • 0 of 1 enrolled
  • ,

Maureen Collins

LLR 68000 | Independent Summer Research
Maureen Collins

This course is for graduate students receiving a summer stipend and conducting independent research. Registering for this course will ensure proper classification for tax purposes. Only those students both actively engaged in research and receiving a stipend are eligible for this course.

  • French
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1058
  • 0 of 500 enrolled
  • ,

LLR 78599 | Thesis Direction

For students doing thesis work for a research master's degree.

  • French
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1059
  • 0 of 1 enrolled
  • ,

Alessia Blad-Miller

LLR 14101 | Beginning Italian I
Alessia Blad-Miller

Welcome to ROIT 14101 - Beginning Italian I Online Course. This course focuses on developing students' competency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. ROIT 14101 will be conducted entirely online. You will not need to be physically present on campus in order to be a student in this class. You will need to have access to a computer with a microphone, headphones, a video camera and high speed internet. We will use the latest edition of the Textbook Sentieri published by Vista Higher Learning and the Supersite. You will need to purchase the access to the Supersite with your textbook. Since the course will be held entirely online, it requires students to work independently and follow a very structured syllabus. Each day you will be involved in a variety of online tasks such as reading, listening, completing exercises, posting writing assignments and recording responses on the Supersite. Twice a week during our virtual classroom time, you will meet in real time with your instructors and a small number of classmates. Your instructors will be available for online office hours twice a week **Course number ROIT 14101 Beginning Italian I is also used during the Fall and Spring semester for study abroad introductory Italian courses. Only taken for 3 credits in Beijing - Peking University.

  • Italian
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1044
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • TBA 06/14 - 07/02
  • OLF,ZOBC,ZODO,ZORE,ZORF,ZORY,

Tiziana Serafini

LLR 14102 | Beginning Italian II
Tiziana Serafini

Welcome to ROIT 14102 - Beginning Italian II Online Course. This course focuses on developing students' competency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. ROIT 14102 will be conducted entirely online. You will not need to be physically present on campus in order to be a student in this class. You will need to have access to a computer with a microphone, headphones, a video camera and high speed internet. We will use the latest edition of the Textbook Sentieri published by Vista Higher Learning and the Supersite. You will need to purchase the access to the Supersite with your textbook. Since the course will be held entirely online, it requires students to work independently and follow a very structured syllabus. Each day you will be involved in a variety of online tasks such as reading, listening, completing exercises, posting writing assignments and recording responses on the Supersite. Twice a week during our virtual classroom time, you will meet in real time with your instructors and a small number of classmates. Your instructors will be available for online office hours twice a week.

  • Italian
  • 4.0 credits    CRN 1045
  • 0 of 20 enrolled
  • TBA 07/05 - 07/23
  • OLF,ZODO,ZORX,ZORY,

Patrick Vivirito

LLR 24231 | Intermediate Italian I-Online
Patrick Vivirito

Welcome to ROIT 24231-Intermediate Italian I Online Course. This is an intermediate second-year language course with equal focus on oral and written production will be conducted entirely online. The course includes a review of basic grammar and then transitions into more difficult features of Italian. Students learn to discuss and write about Italian cultural topics, current events, and literary texts. For this online course students will not need to be physically present on campus in order to be a student in this class. Students enrolled in the course will need to have access to a computer with a microphone, headphones, a video camera and high speed internet. Since the course will be held entirely online, it requires students to work independently and follow a very structured syllabus. Each day you will be involved in a variety of online tasks such as reading, listening, completing exercises, posting writing assignments and recording responses on the Supersite. Some virtual classroom time is required where students will meet in real time with the instructors and a small number of classmates. Instructors will be available for online office hours.

  • Italian
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1046
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • TBA 06/14 - 07/23
  • LANG,OLF,SCLN,ZODO,

Kathleen Boyle

LLR 64050 | Italian Graduate Reading
Kathleen Boyle

This online intensive study of Italian grammar and syntax is intended for graduate students working n the humanities or sciences who are interested in acquiring reading proficiency in Italian.

  • Italian
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1047
  • 0 of 15 enrolled
  • TBA 06/14 - 07/23
  • OLF,ZODO,

Maureen Collins

LLR 68000 | Independent Summer Research
Maureen Collins

This course is for graduate students receiving a summer stipend and conducting independent research. Registering for this course will ensure proper classification for tax purposes. Only those students both actively engaged in research and receiving a stipend are eligible for this course.

  • Italian
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1040
  • 0 of 500 enrolled
  • ,

LLR 76000 | Directed Readings

Specialized reading related to the student's area of study.

  • Italian
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1041
  • 0 of 2 enrolled
  • ,

LLR 76000 | Directed Readings

Specialized reading related to the student's area of study.

  • Italian
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1042
  • 0 of 2 enrolled
  • ,

LLR 76000 | Directed Readings

Specialized reading related to the student's area of study.

  • Italian
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1043
  • 0 of 2 enrolled
  • ,

LLR 10102 | Beginning Spanish II

This is an introductory, first-year language sequence with equal focus on the four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. An appreciation for Hispanic cultures is also encouraged through readings and class discussion. The sequence is to be followed by ROSP 20201 or ROSP 20215. Students must have a Language Exam Score between 281 and 340 to enroll in this class.

  • Spanish
  • 4.0 credits    CRN 1027
  • 0 of 15 enrolled
  • NVCA,OLH,

LLR 20201 | Intermediate Spanish I

This is an intermediate second-year language sequence with equal focus on oral and writing skills. It includes a review of basic grammar and then transitions into more difficult features of Spanish. Students learn to discuss and write about Hispanic cultural topics, current events, and literary texts. Student must have a Language Exam Score between 341 and 393 to register for this class.

  • Spanish
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1028
  • 0 of 17 enrolled
  • LANG,MESE,NVCA,SCLN,ZCSC,ZFTY,

LLR 20202 | Intermediate Spanish II

This is an intermediate second-year language sequence with equal focus on oral and writing skills. It includes a review of basic grammar and then transitions into more difficult features of Spanish. Students learn to discuss and write about Hispanic cultural topics, current events, and literary texts. Students must have a Language Exam Score between 394 and 439 to enroll in this class.

  • Spanish
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1029
  • 0 of 15 enrolled
  • ALLN,LANG,MESE,SCLN,ZCSC,ZFTY,

Maria Coloma

LLR 24460 | Spanish for Medical Profession
Maria Coloma

This course is designed for students interested in professions in health care. It is an online-only course that will be taught completely in Spanish. The principal goal will be to gain confidence approaching and effectively interacting with a Spanish-speaking patient and their family. Meetings consist mainly of class discussions using creative and dynamic activities. Active participation is required. We will use the online version of the A su salud!, published by The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Additional reading and videos will be placed in Sakai. Other topics and methods include practical terminology, a review of hospital settings, multimedia simulations, recorded doctor-patient interactions, and current medical events. Grammar will focus on the formal way to address a Spanish-speaking patient. The course will also increase awareness of Latino cultural and moral beliefs.

  • Spanish
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1454
  • 0 of 16 enrolled
  • TWR 04:00 PM-05:30 PM 05/31 - 07/23
  • ALLN,LANG,OLF,SCLN,ZCSC,ZODO,ZTST,

Juan Vitulli

LLR 34980 | Chile. Now and Then
Juan Vitulli

In this class, we will study Early Modern Hispanic texts as well as contemporary fictions that have in common their way to create and describe real and imagined universes. We will pay specific attention to descriptions of imagined places together with imaginary people vis a vis with historical texts in order to see how they explore tensions around class, gender, society, religion, racial identities, imperial subjects, and power. We will specifically work with cultural artifacts that deal with Chile and now are part of the Chilean tradition. Although the course focuses mainly in the Early Modern period, it will also include Chilean contemporary texts and cultural productions. This course can count as the Introduction to Hispanic Literatures and Cultures, Early Latin-America Literature and Culture, or Modern Latin-America Literature and Culture requirement. Pre-Reqs: ROSP 20202, or 20215, or 20450, or 20460, or 20600, or 20810, or 30310, or 30320, or by placement.

  • Spanish
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1344
  • 0 of 16 enrolled
  • ZOSC,

LLR 60102 | Beginning Spanish II

This is an introductory, first-year language sequence with equal focus on the four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. An appreciation for Hispanic cultures is also encouraged through readings and class discussion. The sequence is to be followed by ROSP 20201 or ROSP 20215. Students must have a Language Exam Score between 281 and 340 to enroll in this class.

  • Spanish
  • 4.0 credits    CRN 1030
  • 0 of 2 enrolled
  • ,

LLR 60202 | Intermediate Spanish II

This is an intermediate second-year language sequence with equal focus on oral and writing skills. It includes a review of basic grammar and then transitions into more difficult features of Spanish. Students learn to discuss and write about Hispanic cultural topics, current events, and literary texts.

  • Spanish
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1031
  • 0 of 2 enrolled
  • ,

Maureen Collins

LLR 68000 | Independent Summer Research
Maureen Collins

This course is for graduate students receiving a summer stipend and conducting independent research. Registering for this course will ensure proper classification for tax purposes. Only those students both actively engaged in research and receiving a stipend are eligible for this course.

  • Spanish
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1048
  • 0 of 500 enrolled
  • ,

LLR 76000 | Directed Readings

Specialized reading related to the student's area of study.

  • Spanish
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1049
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • ,

LLR 76000 | Directed Readings

Specialized reading related to the student's area of study.

  • Spanish
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1050
  • 0 of 2 enrolled
  • ,

LLR 78599 | Thesis Direction

For students doing thesis work for a research master's degree.

  • Spanish
  • 1.0 credits    CRN 1052
  • 0 of 1 enrolled
  • ,

LLR 98601 | Research & Dissertation

Research & Dissertation for graduate students.

  • Spanish
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1053
  • 0 of 1 enrolled
  • ,

Michael Morris

MCKA 34997 | Entrepreneurship Field Exp.
Michael Morris

This course provides interaction with township entrepreneurs over six weeks as part of structured consulting engagements. Consulting engagements start at the same time as the class meetings. Teams of five or six students are assigned to work with two entrepreneurial businesses. Team members must develop a relationship with the entrepreneur, establish trust, learn as much as possible about the entrepreneur and his/her venture, determine priorities, select problems that can be addressed within the time of the consulting engagement, perform the necessary research and analysis on possible solutions to these problems, design detailed solutions and related action plans, and most importantly, implement the solutions. Teams are mentored by three faculty members. A final consulting report summarizes the teams' assessment of each venture and the set of deliverables produced for the clients. Students must maintain journals of their experiences.

  • Social Entreprneurshp&Innovatn
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1491
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • SEIC,ZOSE,

Michael Morris

MCKA 34998 | Support Emerging Enterprises
Michael Morris

This course introduces students to the South African context, poverty entrepreneurship, the basics of consulting, a process consulting approach, the SEE consulting model, a consulting toolkit, and creative yet practical approaches to addressing developmental issues in emerging small businesses.

  • Social Entreprneurshp&Innovatn
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1492
  • 0 of 10 enrolled
  • SEIC,ZOSE,

Russell Faeges

SOC 20410 | Health, Medicine, and Society
Russell Faeges

How is the chronic stress of poverty related to negative health outcomes? Why are infant mortality rates higher among some groups than others? What is the relationship between gender and mental health care? We will address these and several other important questions as we discuss the complex and dynamic intersections of health, medicine, and society. In this class, we also pay particular attention to differential access to health care among various groups in society, changing perceptions of health and medicine over time, and the role of social networks in both health behaviors as well as the diffusion of illness.

  • Sociology
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1025
  • 0 of 19 enrolled
  • CSTE,

Maureen Collins

SOC 67890 | Independent Summer Research
Maureen Collins

This course is for graduate students receiving a summer stipend and conducting independent research. Registering for this course will ensure proper classification for tax purposes. Only those students both actively engaged in research and receiving a stipend are eligible for this course.

  • Sociology
  • 0.0 credits    CRN 1572
  • 0 of 49 enrolled
  • ,

STV 24632 | Robot Ethics

Robots or "autonomous systems" play an ever-increasing role in many areas, from weapons systems and driverless cars to health care and consumer services. As a result, it is ever more important to ask whether it makes any sense to speak of such systems' behaving ethically and how we can build into their programming what some call "ethics modules." After a brief technical introduction to the field, this course will approach these questions through contemporary philosophical literature on robot ethics and through popular media, including science fiction text and video. This is an online course with required, regular class sessions each week. Class meetings are online via Zoom webinar software (provided by the University).

  • Science, Technology and Values
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1307
  • 0 of 5 enrolled
  • TBA 05/31 - 07/23
  • OLF,ZODO, PHI2,WKSP

THEO 10001 | Found of Theo: Biblcl Historcl

This first course in theology offers a critical study of the Bible and early Christian tradition. Following an introduction to the Old and New Testaments, students follow major post-biblical developments in Christian life and worship (e.g., liturgy, theology, doctrine, asceticism), emphasizing the first five centuries.

  • Theology
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1252
  • 0 of 25 enrolled
  • ZFYS, THEO,WKFT

THEO 10002 | Found of Theo: Biblcl Historcl

This first course in theology offers a critical study of the Bible and early Christian tradition. Following an introduction to the Old and New Testaments, students follow major post-biblical developments in Christian life and worship (e.g., liturgy, theology, doctrine, asceticism), emphasizing the first five centuries.

  • Theology
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1253
  • 0 of 20 enrolled
  • , THEO,WKFT

Ian Gerdon

THEO 20207 | In Dark Times
Ian Gerdon

We can only live good lives, the philosopher Hannah Arendt proposed, if we can make reasonable guesses as to what the future will bring. (Will your major connect you to an important career? Will your family thrive as the years advance? Will Notre Dame beat Michigan next time?) But what happens when our expectations are upended? How can we live good lives if we have no clear sense of how to deal with the challenges of today - no clear sense of what tomorrow will bring? In this class, we will look at how Christians responded to the end of the world. This does not mean an imminent apocalypse (though sometimes that was expected), but the collapse of a civilization, a cultural order, or a set of shared expectations that shaped how people made sense of the world and made choices within it. We will focus on two periods of social disintegration: the early Middle Ages, when the age-old Roman Empire (which had seemed to Christians like a providential gift for the spread of the Gospel) collapsed, and the 20th century, when the globe was shaken by world wars, genocides, atomic bombs, and a moral and metaphysical confusion that, some argue, persists to this day. Thereby, we will attend to three issues. First, the theology of history or of providence. How do Christians make sense of God's activity in history, with its moments of disaster and prosperity? Second, the choices people make about how to live a good life within history, which together constitute a morality. Third, and most importantly for our purposes, how do we understand the world we live in and the choices we make within it? Is the world improving, laboriously but steadily? Do we live in a world that trembles on the surface but remains solid at its foundation? Is the world on the verge of collapse? Whatever the case may be, how should we live within it?

  • Theology
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1416
  • 0 of 30 enrolled
  • , THE2,WKDT

Gabriel Reynolds

THEO 24864 | Quran, Bible, & Christn Theo
Gabriel Reynolds

The goal of this course is to introduce students to the ways in which Christian theologians have interpreted the scripture of Islam, the Qur'an, through the centuries, and to explore with them possible Christian theological responses to that scripture. To that end the course will involve a clear presentation of the Qur'an and Qur'anic Studies, the relationship of the Qur'an to the Bible, and the tradition of Christian theological reflection on non-Christian religions. This course fulfills the second ("development") requirement. No background in the Qur'an, Arabic, or Islam, is required or expected of students.

  • Theology
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1450
  • 0 of 25 enrolled
  • MWR 06:00 PM-07:30 PM 06/07 - 07/23
  • OLF,ZODO, THE2,WKDT

Leonard DeLorenzo

THEO 24872 | Discernment: Theo & Practice
Leonard DeLorenzo

This course studies the theology of discernment in the Christian tradition, principally in relation to a theology of vocation as the challenge and possibility of "hearing the word of God and acting on it." In order to study what it means to "hear", the course will attend to the importance of solitude, contemplation, and developing a scriptural memory within the Christian tradition, while also diagnosing the challenges to listening in the modern world. To study what it means to "act" on the word of God, the course will attend to the priority of mercy, commitment, and sacrifice in the Christian life. Methodologically, part of the study of discernment will include engaging in and reflecting on practices of discernment that relate to the "hearing" and "acting" dimensions of the Christian vocation.

  • Theology
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1408
  • 0 of 25 enrolled
  • MWR 05:00 PM-06:30 PM 05/31 - 07/23
  • OLF,ZODO,

Matthew Genung

THEO 60188 | Death & Resurrection
Matthew Genung

According to biblical scholar Jon Levenson, the master theme of the Old Testament is the death and resurrection of the Beloved Son. This course explores early iterations of this theme in the narrative of Genesis, traces its development with respect to the life of people Israel, and anticipates its use in the New Testament in reference to Jesus.

  • Theology
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1417
  • 0 of 27 enrolled
  • ,

Ulrich Lehner

THEO 60206 | Catholic Reform
Ulrich Lehner

Catholic theology between 1450 and 1800 is usually eclipsed in church history narratives. Yet, it was the time of the Catholic Reform with the great Carmelite mystics John of the Cross, Teresa of Avila, and Jesuits like Robert Bellarmine and many others. This course will familiarize students with a rich, much neglected tradition of theology and church history.

  • Theology
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1351
  • 0 of 27 enrolled
  • ,

John Cavadini

THEO 60222 | Christian Doctrine/Catechists
John Cavadini

This course is intended to serve as a resource for catechists and religious educators. It provides a basic theological introduction to the material represented in Pillars I and II of the Catechism of the Catholic Church : the Creed and the Sacraments. The course is specifically designed to cover this material in a way that will provide facility in teaching it in a variety of contexts. Readings will come not only from the Catechism , but from various primary sources, both traditional and contemporary illustrative of the theology that forms its background. The course will be especially useful for anyone wishing to acquire an understanding of the basic doctrines of the Catholic faith and of the theological integration of these doctrines.

  • Theology
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1221
  • 0 of 40 enrolled
  • ,

Joshua McManaway

THEO 60250 | Intro. to the Early Church
Joshua McManaway

The passage of many centuries since the birth of Christianity may sometimes have the effect of dulling our appreciation of how pressing the questions facing the early Church were. How does our faith relate to Judaism? Are the Scriptures of Israel truly the Word of God? How should we view the secular state and secular learning? These and other questions were worked out in a rich context of expressed Christian identity: a developing canon of Sacred Scripture, liturgical worship, a sense of moral difference and evangelical mission. Early Christian communities produced colorful and compelling figures such as clergy, prophets, laypeople, apologists, martyrs, and monastics. At the heart of it all lies the ultimate question: the figure of Jesus himself, who claimed to enjoy a unique filial relationship with the God of Israel. The quest for adequate ways of speaking about this relationship, which forms the generative center of Christian faith, gave rise to the great Christological and Trinitarian debates of the fourth and fifth centuries. The course will seek an understanding of these debates not as dry, rarefied, academic quarrels, but as issues of great moment for Christian self-understanding.

  • Theology
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1211
  • 0 of 27 enrolled
  • ,

Georgios Kordis

THEO 60456 | Writing with Light: A Byz Icon
Georgios Kordis

The course introduces the student to the theory and practice of the art of Icon Painting, according to the Byzantine Tradition. The basic ideals and principles of the Theory of Byzantine Painting will be presented in relation to Patristic Iconology, on which the art of Iconography is founded. The main aim of the course is to introduce participants to the traditional process of painting an icon with the use of the Egg tempera technique. Students are called to make an icon during the ten class sessions of the course.

  • Theology
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1349
  • 0 of 12 enrolled
  • ,

David Fagerberg

THEO 60462 | Liturgical Theo of Eucharist
David Fagerberg

This course will focus on the Eucharist as a way into liturgical theology. We will examine the historical structure and content of the Eucharistic liturgy, and from there proceed into reflecting upon various theological doctrines. That is, we will connect liturgical life with theological truths like divinization, transubstantiation, sacrifice, priesthood of baptized and ordained, eschatology, etc. We will conclude by seeing how the lex orandi of the church's Eucharist establishes the lex credendi of Church teaching, and ecclesial ministries of catechesis and evangelization.

  • Theology
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1212
  • 0 of 27 enrolled
  • ,

William Mattison

THEO 60601 | Foundations of Moral Theology
William Mattison

This course introduces the history and patterns of thought that provide the foundations for contemporary discussions about moral theology in the Roman Catholic Church. Its central aim will be to position moral theology as a practical and pastoral expression of Christian faith, but also as a tradition of inquiry relevant to wider discussions about moral matters in the academy and in society. Topics to be considered include: sources for moral theology, genres of moral writing, the nature of the human person and her relationship to the community of disciples, the dynamics of moral action, and the topics of freedom, experience, authority, virtue, and forgiveness. Course requirements include two short reflection papers and a final research paper, which may be customized to students' own ongoing pastoral and/or academic questions.

  • Theology
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1213
  • 0 of 27 enrolled
  • ,

Paulinus Odozor

THEO 60609 | Christn Ethics & Pastrl Pract.
Paulinus Odozor

Faith in Jesus Christ as Lord and savior has practical implications for the way believers construe the world and organize their lives. What these implications are for Christian life in some specific areas of life and the tensions which arise from the attempt of the Christian community to remain faithful to the teachings of the Lord Jesus while trying to live a fully human life - this is at the core of our course.

  • Theology
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1214
  • 0 of 27 enrolled
  • ,

Kristin Colberg

THEO 60806 | Ecclesiology
Kristin Colberg

This course examines the development of the Church from both theological and historical perspectives. It seeks to assist students in constructing and refining critical principles of interpretation that apply directly to the mystery, mission, ministries and structure of the Church. Of central concern are the questions of how the Church has understood its mission at various points in its history and what developments have impacted this understanding. Strong emphasis is placed on the theological developments that have occurred before, during and after the Second Vatican Council as these periods saw critical development in the Church's self-understanding.

  • Theology
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1215
  • 0 of 27 enrolled
  • ,

Janice Poorman

THEO 60848 | Theological Integration
Janice Poorman

In Theological Integration, students pursue the integration of theological competence with pastoral skill in their developing ministerial identity. The primary learning dynamic for the seminar is dialogical and incorporates theological reflection on ministry/teaching experiences using a case study method originally designed for use by the Master of Divinity Program at the University of Notre Dame. Each student is required to design and facilitate one case study during the seminar. In advance of their case study presentation, individual students are required to work with the course professor on Zoom for 45-60 minutes to design the case using a narrative and six analytical lenses. Students then present their case studies to their peers and facilitate conversation during Zoom class session. In addition, students engage in affirmation and critique of their peers? case studies, the written versions, as well as their classroom presentations/facilitations. Finally, students are required (either singly or as a pair) to outline and facilitate a classroom conversation on theological articles pertaining to ministerial identity and praxis.

  • Theology
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1216
  • 0 of 15 enrolled
  • ,

Janice Poorman

THEO 60848 | Theological Integration
Janice Poorman

In Theological Integration, students pursue the integration of theological competence with pastoral skill in their developing ministerial identity. The primary learning dynamic for the seminar is dialogical and incorporates theological reflection on ministry/teaching experiences using a case study method originally designed for use by the Master of Divinity Program at the University of Notre Dame. Each student is required to design and facilitate one case study during the seminar. In advance of their case study presentation, individual students are required to work with the course professor on Zoom for 45-60 minutes to design the case using a narrative and six analytical lenses. Students then present their case studies to their peers and facilitate conversation during Zoom class session. In addition, students engage in affirmation and critique of their peers? case studies, the written versions, as well as their classroom presentations/facilitations. Finally, students are required (either singly or as a pair) to outline and facilitate a classroom conversation on theological articles pertaining to ministerial identity and praxis.

  • Theology
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1217
  • 0 of 15 enrolled
  • ,

Shawn Colberg, Michael Heintz

THEO 60884 | Trinity & Christian Salvation
Shawn Colberg, Michael Heintz

A famous 20th Century theologian wrote that, "despite their orthodox confession of the Trinity, Christians are, in their practical life, almost mere `monotheists'." By implication, this would mean that "in their practical life", Christians are not typically in the habit of actually practicing Christianity, since the Christian faith is irreducibly Trinitarian. No study of the Trinity can be strictly removed from the life of faith, and the life of faith for the Christian is ordered to the Persons of the Trinity. This course therefore pursues the contours and the content of the Christian doctrine of God, tracing its developments over the centuries and examining how it is made manifest the Christian life of prayer, liturgy and sacrament, and charity. Since Jesus Christ is at once the revelation of God to man and of man to himself, Christological studies will take a central role in our work. In sum, this course equips and challenges students to grapple with the mystery of St. Paul's teaching that, for the Christian, your life is hidden with Christ in God (Col. 3:3).

  • Theology
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1220
  • 0 of 27 enrolled
  • ,

Todd Walatka

THEO 60893 | Teaching Theology
Todd Walatka

This course will provide an introduction to pedagogy for theological educators. The primary focus of the course will be on a) the vocation of teaching theology and b) basic pedagogical principles for the theology classroom. Students will engage educational and sociological research relevant to teaching high school theology and learn pedagogical techniques which build upon this research. Much of the class will be spent working through how to teach key doctrinal moments in the U.S. Catholic Bishops' High School Curriculum Framework in a pedagogically effective manner.

  • Theology
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1218
  • 0 of 15 enrolled
  • ,

Timothy O'Malley

THEO 60894 | The Art of Catechesis
Timothy O'Malley

In this course, students will be introduced to the art of catechesis as a sacramental and aesthetic ministry within the Church. In the first week of the course, students will learn the major principles governing the ministry of catechesis as related to a participation in divine Revelation. They will also read chief classics in catechesis within the history of Christianity. After this introduction, the course will be structured around the experience of education as described by Luigi Giussani. How does the catechist provoke the student to encounter the living God? How does the catechist introduce the student to the ultimate hypothesis at the heart of Christianity? And how does the catechist initiate students into practices within a community of faith that allow for the verification of the Gospel in one's life? In answering each of these questions, the students will deepen their theoretical and practical capacity to function as a catechist within the Church. In the final week, students will consider the Catholic school as a place of evangelization, focused on the intellectual formation of the students. Here, readings will be centered on a Catholic philosophy and theology of education.

  • Theology
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1219
  • 0 of 27 enrolled
  • ,

Brett Robinson

THEO 60901 | Symposia Course
Brett Robinson

2021 Topic: Evangelization and Media. The Church?s mission to evangelize the world has not changed in over 2000 years. What has changed are the means by which the faith is proclaimed across time and cultures. In this hybrid course, students will consider the ways in which new cultural forms of communication have both enhanced and inhibited evangelization efforts. From ancient preaching to the letters of Saint Paul, from medieval manuscripts to the artistic triumphs of the Renaissance, and from mass media to social media, the relationship between faith, culture and communication has a long and important history. This course will consider the ways in which historical forms of communication have converged in digital culture and how pastoral leaders can overcome the contradiction between preaching an incarnate religion in an increasingly disembodied digital world. After a 4-week online course, students will travel to Notre Dame to meet with a cohort of pastoral leaders in the McGrath Institute for Church Life?s ?Church Communications Ecology Program? (June 16-19, 2021). Together they will discuss contemporary issues in evangelization and explore the Notre Dame campus and its various media of evangelization, from the stained glass windows of the Basilica of the Sacred Heart to the state of the art Martin Media Center.

  • Theology
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1222
  • 0 of 30 enrolled
  • WRFS 08:00 AM-05:00 PM 06/16 - 06/19
  • OLH,

Gabriel Reynolds

THEO 64210 | The Holy Land
Gabriel Reynolds

In our course we will travel to the Holy Land and discover its place in the religious ideas of Christians and Muslims. During our time in the Holy Land we will both study Christian and Islamic texts and witness in person the geography and archaeology of sites important to Christian and Islamic history. The first half of the course is focused on the classical period of the Holy Land, from the time of Jesus through the early Islamic era. We will examine the vision of the Holy Land in the New Testament, the early Christian reception of Jewish veneration for the land of Israel, the triumph of the Byzantine Church, the Islamic conquest of Palestine, and the meaning of the Dome of the Rock and the Aqsa mosque. During the second half of the course we will turn to the Crusades and the modern period. We will examine the rise and fall of Crusader States, the centuries of later Islamic rule, and the popular literature, religious pamphlets and websites and social media of the Muslim and Christian faithful today. Through our studies we will both examine the place of the Holy Land in Christian-Muslim Relations, and reflect theologically on the meaning of the Holy Land to the Church.

  • Theology
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1350
  • 0 of 22 enrolled
  • ,

Catherine Cavadini

THEO 64216 | Telling the Stories of Saints
Catherine Cavadini

In this course we will read the biographies of three great women saints: Catherine of Siena, Joan of Arc, and Bernadette Soubirous. We will explore the ways saints are explained and how their stories inspire us to be "nothing less than saints" ourselves. This is a six-week on-line course.

  • Theology
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1255
  • 0 of 20 enrolled
  • OLF,ZODO,

John Cavadini

THEO 64222 | Apologetics of Love
John Cavadini

This course is intended to serve as a resource for catechists and religious educators. It provides a basic theological introduction to the material represented in Pillars I and II of the Catechism of the Catholic Church : the Creed and the Sacraments. The course is specifically designed to cover this material in a way that will provide facility in teaching it in a variety of contexts. Readings will come not only from the Catechism , but from various primary sources, both traditional and contemporary illustrative of the theology that forms its background. With regard to the student's facility in learning to teach the materials, the course focuses on an Apologetics of Love, based largely on the work of Joseph Ratzinger/Pope Benedict XVI. The course will be especially useful for anyone wishing to acquire an understanding of the basic doctrines of the Catholic faith and of the theological integration of these doctrines.

  • Theology
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1254
  • 0 of 40 enrolled
  • OLF,ZODO,

Todd Walatka

THEO 68803 | MA Capstone Course
Todd Walatka

This course will bring together insights from the curriculum that students have taken in diverse fields by looking at the theme of mercy in Catholic theology. Using Walter Kasper's Mercy: The Essence of the Gospel and the Key to Christian Life as an anchor text, we will reflect on and interrelate approaches to mercy in systematic theology, biblical studies, moral theology, liturgical studies, historical theology and spirituality studies.

  • Theology
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1451
  • 0 of 15 enrolled
  • TBA 05/24 - 06/20
  • OLH,

Anthony Pagliarini

THEO 68803 | MA Capstone Course
Anthony Pagliarini

This course will bring together insights from the curriculum that students have taken in diverse fields by looking at the theme of mercy in Catholic theology. Using Walter Kasper's Mercy: The Essence of the Gospel and the Key to Christian Life as an anchor text, we will reflect on and interrelate approaches to mercy in systematic theology, biblical studies, moral theology, liturgical studies, historical theology and spirituality studies.

  • Theology
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1452
  • 0 of 15 enrolled
  • TBA 05/24 - 06/20
  • OLH,

Catherine Cavadini

THEO 68803 | MA Capstone Course
Catherine Cavadini

This course will bring together insights from the curriculum that students have taken in diverse fields by looking at the theme of mercy in Catholic theology. Using Walter Kasper's Mercy: The Essence of the Gospel and the Key to Christian Life as an anchor text, we will reflect on and interrelate approaches to mercy in systematic theology, biblical studies, moral theology, liturgical studies, historical theology and spirituality studies.

  • Theology
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1453
  • 0 of 15 enrolled
  • TBA 05/24 - 06/20
  • ,

THEO 68803 | MA Capstone Course

This course will bring together insights from the curriculum that students have taken in diverse fields by looking at the theme of mercy in Catholic theology. Using Walter Kasper's Mercy: The Essence of the Gospel and the Key to Christian Life as an anchor text, we will reflect on and interrelate approaches to mercy in systematic theology, biblical studies, moral theology, liturgical studies, historical theology and spirituality studies.

  • Theology
  • 3.0 credits    CRN 1369
  • 0 of 15 enrolled
  • ,

Course Attribute Codes


2DCO 2DCO - 2D Studio Core Option
3DCO 3DCO - 3D Studio Core Option
ACCT ACCT - M.S. Accountancy
ACCY ACCY - M.S. Accountancy E&Y
AERO Inactive-AERO-AERO Electives
AERT AERT - AERO Tech Specializatio
AFAL AFAL - AFST Literature
AFHI AFHI - AFST History
AFSS AFSS - AFST Social Science
AHAA AHAA - ARHI Ancient Art
AHGR AHGR - Grad Level ARHI
AHMA AHMA - ARHI Medieval Art
AHMO AHMO - ARHI Modern Art
AHPO AHPO - ARHI Post-1600 Content
AHPR AHPR - ARHI Pre-1600 Content
AHRB AHRB - ARHI Ren. & Baroque Art
ALHN ALHN- Glynn Family Honors Prgm
ALLN ALLN-Arts&Letters Language Req
ALSS ALSS - A & L- Social Science
AMAN Inactive-AMAN-AMSTAnthro
AMEN Inactive-AMEN-AMST English
AMET Inactive-AMET - AME Tech Elect
AMHI Inactive-AMHI-AMST History
AMIN Inactive-AMIN - AMST Inside
AMPO Inactive-AMPO - AMST Pol Sci
AMS1 AMS1 - AMST Category 1
AMS2 AMS2 - AMST Category 2
AMS3 AMS3 - AMST Category 3
AMSO Inactive-AMSO - AMST Soc Conc
ANAM Inactive-ANAM-ANTH Approach &
ANAS Inactive-ANAS-ANTH AreaStudies
ANEV Inactive-ANEV-ANTH Evol Persp
ANHS Inactive-ANHS-ANTH HonorsExper
ANME ANME - ANTH Methods
ANSE Inactive-ANSE-ANTH Adv Seminar
ANTA Inactive-ANTA-ANTHTopicsAnthro
ARMH ARMH - Army ROTC Military Hist
ASHI ASHI - Asian Studies History
ASHU ASHU -Asian Studies Humanities
ASLI ASLI - Asian Studies Lit/Cultr
ASSS ASSS - Asian Studies Soc Sci
BA01 BA01-Sequence 1 Business Class
BA02 BA02-Sequence 2 Business Class
BA03 BA03-Sequence 3 Business Class
BAMC BAMC-Major-lvl business course
BEHA BEHA - Behavioral Science
BIOE BIOE-Bioengineerng minor rqmnt
BLAB BLAB - Biology Lab
BSTA Inactive-BSTA - Business Stats
CAPA CAPA - CAPP Applications
CAPE CAPE - CAPP Computer Ethics
CAPL CAPL - CAPP Computer Languages
CAPS Inactive-CAPS - CAPP Stats
CAPT CAPT - CAPP Tech & Society
CBAN CBAN -conc in Business Anlytcs
CBIN CBIN-conc in Business Intlgnce
CDCR CDCR Comptng & Digtl Tech Core
CDCS CDCS- Cmp&Dgtl Tch Cgntve Sci
CDCY CDCY- Cmp&Dgtl Tch Cybr Secrty
CDDA CDDA- Cmp&Dgtl Tch Dgtl Arts
CDDF CDDF- Computatnl/Digital Focus
CDDH CDDH- Cmp&Dgtl Tch Humanities
CDND CDND- Not Comptatnl/Dgtl Focus
CDTD CDTD- Cmp&Dgtl Tch Dev & Mgt
CDUI CDUI- Cmp&Dgtl Tch Usr Intrfce
CEEL Inactive-CEEL - CE Electives
CETE CETE - CE Technical Electives
CFEL CFEL-ECON Financial Concntratn
CHEA CHEA - EALC China or East Asia
CHEG Inactive-CHEG - CHEG Electives
CHGT Inactive-CHGT - CHEG TechElect
CHLT CHLT - EALC Literature
CHSE CHSE - CHEM Science Electives
COMP Inactive-Univ.Req. 1st Yr Comp
CPE2 Inactive-CPE2-CAPPAdd'l Ethics
CPEE CPEE - CPEG Free Elective Seq.
CPTE CPTE - CPEG Technical Elect
CSEM CSEM - College Seminar
CSET Inactive-CSET - CS Tech Elec
CSSE Inactive-CSSE - CS Electives
CSTC CSTC - CST Colloquium
CSTE CSTE - CST Elective
CSTS CSTS - CST Seminar
ECDV Inactive-ECDV - ECON Devel
ECHP Inactive-ECHP - ECON Hist&Phil
ECIN Inactive-ECIN -ECON Internat'l
ECIO Inactive-ECIO-ECON IndustOrg
ECLB Inactive-ECLB - ECON Labor
ECMF Inactive-ECMF-ECONMonetary&Fin
ECPO Inactive-ECPO-ECON Pol Econ
ECQM Inactive-ECQM-ECON Quant Meth
ECUR Inactive-ECUR-ECON Urban&Reg
ECWI ECWI - ECON Writing Intensive
EEEL Inactive-EEEL - EE Electives
EELE EELE - EE LabElective
EESE EESE - EE Science Electives
EETE EETE - EE Technical Electives
EINT